What is in Your Heart? (Hebrews 8; Hebrews 9)

Click on this link for translations of today’s devotional.

Scripture reading – Hebrews 8; Hebrews 9

We continue our study of the Epistle to the Hebrews (chapters 8 and 9), and are reminded of the twofold focus of this passage: Christ, the believer’s High Priest; and the New Covenant which He established.

The writer in Hebrews 7 observed how Jesus was “made a surety of a better testament” (7:22). The word “testament,” was a legal term that described a covenant. For example, you might draw up a “Last Will and Testament,” that is effectively a covenant. Such a document is a binding legal agreement between two parties. The purpose of a “Last Will and Testament” is to direct your intentions (plan) for distributing your possessions upon your death. (Unfortunately, greedy relatives and crooked lawyers seemed to have embraced the lawless spirit of our day, and have little respect for wills, testaments, or covenants.)

Fortunately, God is not only the Lawgiver, He is also a just Judge, and forgiving High Priest. We read of Christ, “He is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.” Christ is more than our intercessor (7:24-25), He is our Savior and Redeemer. While the priests of the Old Covenant offered sacrifices for their sins and the people, Christ “offered up Himself” (7:27), and established a New Covenant (Hebrews 8).

Hebrews 8

A Superior High Priest, and A New Covenant (8:1-2)

The New Covenant is the subject of chapter 8, and continued the revelation that Christ is our High Priest, and “is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens” (8:1). Earthly priests were types or symbols of the superior High Priest, Jesus Christ. Because of His sacrificial, substitutionary death, and resurrection from the dead, Jesus is our priest, and ministers in the heavenly, “true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, and not man” (8:2).

An Inferior Tabernacle (8:3-5)

We find a contrast between the earthly tabernacle built by Moses, and the heavenly, eternal sanctuary where Christ is the believer’s High Priest. Because Christ was not of the tribe of Levi, He would not have served as an earthly priest. The priests of Levi offered the blood of sacrifices during Israel’s wanderings in the wilderness. Once a year, only the high priest might enter the “Holy of holies,” and then only with the blood of sacrifice “which he offered for himself” (9:7). Though Moses directed the construction of the tabernacle, according to the patterns God gave him (8:5b), that which was provided was a “type,” an “example and shadow of heavenly things” (8:5).

Israel Broke the Old Covenant (8:6-9)

Notice the adjectives “excellent” and “better” in verse 6. The writer of Hebrews, writing under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, described the ministry of Christ as “a more excellent [surpassing, stronger] ministry.” As our High Priest, Christ “is the mediator of a better [stronger] covenant, which was established upon better [stronger] promises” (8:6). Earthly priests were inferior to Christ, who offered Himself as the perfect, sufficient sacrifice for sins. The weakness or “fault” of the “old covenant” (8:7) was not the covenant, but the sinfulness of men (including the priests).

Lesson – A covenant is only good when both parties keep their vows. For instance, when a man and woman marry, they bind themselves in a “marriage covenant.” God and others present are witnesses of their vows (promises), and the couple exchange rings as a token of their covenant. Tragically, more than 50% of marriage covenants are eventually broken because either the husband or wife fail to keep covenant, not only with their spouse, but with God and those who witnessed their exchange of vows.

The prophet Jeremiah, quoted in Hebrews 8:8-11, observed how the children of Israel had broken covenant with God (Jeremiah 31:31-34). Like a wife who betrays her vows and breaks her marriage covenant, Israel had failed to keep her covenant with God. In Jeremiah’s day, Israel had become not only a divided nation, but her idolatry and failure to keep the Law and Commandments, had robbed the nation of God’s blessings (Deuteronomy 28; Exodus 31).

The Promise of a New Covenant (8:10-13)

If men had kept the first covenant, there would have been no need for a second covenant (8:7b). However, because Israel had not kept her covenant with the LORD, and disregarded His Law, God foresaw the need to establish a “Covenant,” and Christ serve as the everlasting High Priest(8:10).

The first covenant required external obedience, keeping the written law and offering sacrifices. The Lord promised under the “New Covenant,” He would “put [His] laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people” (which will be fulfilled in the Millennial Kingdom, 8:10). In other words, motivated by their love and communion with the Lord, believers should keep covenant with God. The old covenant depended on earthly priests offering sacrifices, and acting as mediators between God and man (8:11a). Under the “New Covenant,” every believer will come before the Lord, “for all shall know [Him], from the least to the greatest” (8:11).

Closing thoughts (8:12-13) – While the old covenant pictured forgiveness through blood sacrifices, the “New Covenant” promised God’s mercy and forgiveness of sins (8:12). Therefore, knowing Christ has established a “Covenant” by His blood, we are confident He is our High Priest and Mediator, and sits “on the right hand of the throne.” Understanding the “New Covenant” has replaced the old (8:13), believers should delight in obeying the principles and precepts of God’s Word, trusting in His grace and promises.

Only as you study and meditate in God’s Word, will His truths rule your heart. What is in your heart?

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Who was Melchisedec, and does it matter? (Hebrews 7) – A video of today’s devotional.

In the same way Melchisedec was “king of Salem, [and] priest of the most high God” (7:1), Jesus Christ is our King, and “a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (7:17). Unlike the priest of Levi, who continually offered sacrifices for their sins, Christ offered Himself “once, when He offered up Himself” (7:27).

What a Savior! What a great High Priest!

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Who was Melchisedec, and does it matter? (Hebrews 7)

Click on this link for translations of today’s devotional.

Scripture reading – Hebrews 7

Today’s devotional is taken from Hebrews 7, and continues with the focus upon Melchisedec, the king and high priest of Salem (the ancient name of Jerusalem, 7:1). The writer of Hebrews introduced us to Melchisedec in chapter 5, where Christ was described as “a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (5:6). In the same chapter we read, Christ was the “author of eternal salvation” (5:9), and “called of God an high priest after the order of Melchisedec” (5:10). The final verse of chapter 6 concluded the same, saying, “Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (6:20).

Who was Melchisedec? (7:1-3)

If you followed this “Heart of a Shepherd” over the course of the past two years, you may recall a man named Melchizedek (the same, though the spelling differs) in our study of the life of Abraham in Genesis 14. Abraham overcame raiders that had captured his nephew Lot’s household, and taken his family and possessions as spoils of war (Genesis 14:10-12). Returning victorious from battle, Abraham was greeted by “Melchizedek king of Salem”(7:1; Genesis 14:18). Of Melchizedek we read, he was “the priest of the most high God” (Genesis 14:18). He pronounced a blessing on Abraham, who in turn rewarded Melchizedek with a tithe, a tenth of the spoils taken in battle (7:2; Genesis 14:19-20).

Besides being a man renown in the Scriptures for his righteousness, Melchizedek was named as king of ancient Jerusalem (Genesis 14:18a), and a priest of Jehovah, “the most high God” (Genesis 14:18b). This Melchizedek was no ordinary king and priest, for he was described as eternal, and “without father, without mother, without descent [human lineage], having neither beginning of days, nor end of life” (7:3).

While I cannot say with certainty who Melchizedek was, we do know: As king and priest, he served as a “type” or picture of Christ who existed before His incarnation, being the Son of God.

Like Melchisedec, Christ is King and High Priest. (7:4-10)

The evidence Melchisedec was a greater priest than Abraham, is that the father of the Hebrews offered a tithe to him (notice the tithe predated the Mosaic Law, 7:4).

The discussion concerning Levi (7:5-10), whose sons were chosen as the priestly order, is an interesting one, because Levi was a son of Jacob, the grandson of Isaac, and the great grandson of Abraham. When Abraham offered a tithe to Melchisedec, he acknowledged that ancient king and priest of Jehovah was greater than himself. Therefore, we can conclude the ancient king and priest was greater than all his lineage, including the priests of Levi (7:5-10).

Closing thoughts – The Priesthood of Jesus Christ (7:11-14)

The balance of chapter 7 continued the parallel drawn between Melchisedec and Jesus Christ (7:11-28). However, I conclude today’s study with Hebrew 7:11-14, hoping to return to this chapter in another year.

Why did Jesus Christ assume the role as High Priest? Answer – Because the Levitical priesthood did not suffice for addressing man’s sin (7:11). The priests were mere men, and had to offer sacrifices for their sins and that of the people. Jesus Christ, however, was like Melchisedec and not of Levi or the Aaronic priesthood. We read, Christ came, not “after the order of Aaron” (7:11), but after “another tribe” (7:13). What was the other tribe? “[Jesus Christ] sprang out of Juda [the tribe of Judah]; of which tribe Moses spake nothing concerning priesthood.”

Summary – In the same way Melchisedec was “king of Salem, [and] priest of the most high God” (7:1), Jesus Christ is our King, and “a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (7:17). Unlike the priest of Levi, who continually offered sacrifices for their sins, Christ offered Himself “once, when He offered up Himself” (7:27).

What a Savior! What a great High Priest!

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Eine Gedeihstörung: Ein tragischer Fall geistiger Unterernährung (Hebräer 5; Hebräer 6)

* To my English followers, the following is a German translation of Sunday’s devotional (12\4\2022).

Schriftlesung – Hebräer 5; Hebräer 6

Unser Studium des Hebräerbriefes wird mit Hebräer 5 und 6 fortgesetzt Andacht wird Hebräer 5 entnommen.

Der Verfasser des Hebräerbriefs hatte die Gläubigen bezüglich der Vorrangstellung Jesu Christi herausgefordert (Hebräer 1). Das Verständnis der Majestät Christi gab den Heiligen des 1. Jahrhunderts Anlass, in ihrem Geist bewegt zu werden, da sie alles wussten, was Er für ihre Sünden erlitten hatte. Jesus ist der Sohn Gottes, aber Er hat die äußerliche Manifestation Seiner himmlischen Herrlichkeit beiseite gelassen und „wurde wegen des Leidens des Todes ein wenig niedriger als die Engel“ (Hebräer 2,9). Durch seinen Tod am Kreuz schmeckte er „den Tod für jeden Menschen“ (Hebräer 2:9b), und durch seine Auferstehung von den Toten wurde er der „Hauptmann“. [und Autor] des Heils“ (Hebräer 2,10).

Hebräer 3 warnte die Hebräer, die Gefahr des Unglaubens zu erkennen und ihre Herzen zu verhärten (Hebräer 3:7-19). Mit der Aufforderung „ermahnt einander täglich“ (Hebräer 3,13) wurden Sünder zum Glauben aufgefordert, sonst würden sie nie Ruhe für ihre Seele finden (Hebräer 3,18). Wir wurden daran erinnert, dass es drei Voraussetzungen für Frieden und Ruhe gibt: Die erste war zur Furcht und Gott ehren (Hebräer 4:1). Zweitens: Hört das Evangelium (Hebräer 4:2), glaubt und kommt zum Herrn durch den Glauben (Hebräer 4:2-11). Schließlich muss ein Gläubiger Ruhe für die Seele finden und kaempfe , literally fleißig arbeiten in der Heiligen Schrift: „Denn das Wort Gottes ist schnell und mächtig und schärfer als jedes zweischneidige Schwert, durchdringend bis zur Trennung von Seele und Geist und von Gelenken und Mark, und es ist ein Unterscheidungsvermögen der Gedanken und Absichten des Herzens“ (Hebräer 4:12).

Da Christus der „Hohepriester“ des Gläubigen ist (Hebräer 4:15), drängte der Verfasser des Hebräerbriefs: „Lasst uns kühn zum Thron der Gnade kommen, damit wir Barmherzigkeit erlangen und Gnade finden, um in Zeiten der Not zu helfen“ ( Hebräer 4:16). Aus welchen Gründen könnten wir mit unseren Bitten in Gottes Gegenwart treten? Nicht auf der Grundlage unserer Werke (denn „unsere Gerechtigkeit ist wie schmutzige Kleider“, Jesaja 64:6), sondern auf der Grundlage, dass die Gerechtigkeit Christi unserem Konto gutgeschrieben wird und unsere Sündenschuld vollständig bezahlt wird! Halleluja, was für ein großer Erlöser und Hohepriester.

Hebräer 5

Hebräer 5 bot einen Kontrast zwischen dem Hohenpriester „für Menschen ordiniert“ und dem Großen Hohepriester, Jesus Christus (Hebräer 5:1). Selbst die engagiertesten und gewissenhaftesten Hohepriester wagten es nicht, sich Gott zu nähern, ohne ein Opfer für ihre Sünden darzubringen (Hebräer 5,2-3). Während der Hohepriester unter den Menschen auserwählt wurde, verkündete Gott von Christus: „Du bist mein Sohn, heute habe ich dich gezeugt … Du bist ein Priester für immer nach der Ordnung Melchisedeks“ (Melchisedek war ein König und Priester des alten Jerusalem , und ein Typus oder Beispiel für Christus, Hebräer 5:5-6).

Wenn Sie sich an Jesu Todeskampf im Garten Gethsemane erinnern, bevor er verraten und verhaftet wurde, werden Sie Hebräer 5,7-10 verstehen. Im Garten betete Jesus, „O mein Vater, wenn es möglich ist, lass diesen Kelch an mir vorübergehen“ (gemeint ist der Leidenskelch, dem er bald begegnen würde (Matthäus 26:39). Er betete ein zweites Mal, „O mein Vater, wenn dieser Kelch nicht an mir vorübergeht, es sei denn, ich trinke ihn, dein Wille geschehe“(Matthäus 26:42). Es ist diese Qual, die wir in Hebräer 5 geschildert finden, wenn wir lesen: „Er hatte Gebete und Flehen mit starkem Schreien und Tränen dem dargebracht, der ihn vom Tod retten konnte, und wurde erhört, weil er sich fürchtete; 8Obwohl er ein Sohn war, lernte er doch den Gehorsam durch die Dinge, die er litt“ (Hebräer 5:7-8).

Christus gehorchte dem Willen seines Vaters und erlitt die Strafe für unsere Sünden (5:8) und war das vollkommene sündlose Opfer. „Er wurde zum Urheber ewigen Heils für alle, die ihm gehorchen“ (Gehorsam impliziert den eigenen Glauben, bewiesen durch Werke, Hebräer 5:9).

Schlussgedanken (Hebräer 5:11-14) – Unser Studium von Hebräer 5 endet mit einem Fall von geistlicher Unterernährung. In einem traurigen, bedauerlichen Ton beobachtete der Autor in der Gemeinde des 1. Jahrhunderts eine geistliche Tragödie, die sich in der Gemeinde des 21. Jahrhunderts widerspiegelt: Ein Versagen, geistlich zu gedeihen. Wie heute gab es einige, die sich zur Errettung bekannten, deren Leben jedoch geistlich anämisch war. Sie zeigten wenig bis gar keinen spirituellen Appetit, und die Diagnose wurde so zusammengefasst: „Ihr seid schwerhörig“ (Hebräer 5:11).

Anstatt Lehrer des Wortes zu sein, begnügten sie sich mit elementaren Lehren und „ersten Grundsätzen der Aussprüche Gottes“ (Hebräer 5,12). Sie hatten den Herrn und sein Volk im Stich gelassen, denn sie blieben in der geistlichen Kinderstube (Hebräer 5:13) und konnten sich nicht an den fortgeschrittenen Lehren und Studien des Wortes erfreuen (Hebräer 5:14). Ihre geistliche Unreife hatte sie verwundbar und unfähig gemacht, „sowohl Gut als auch Böse zu unterscheiden“ (Hebräer 5:14).

Ist das nicht tragischerweise das traurige Bild vieler Gläubiger und Kirchen des 21. Jahrhunderts?

* Sie können ein regelmäßiger Abonnent der täglichen Andachten von Heart of a Shepherd werden und sie direkt an Ihre E-Mail-Adresse senden lassen. Bitte geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse in das Feld rechts (bei Verwendung eines Computers) oder unten (bei Verwendung eines Mobiltelefons) ein.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc ist vom Internal Revenue Service als 501c3 anerkannt und eine öffentliche Wohltätigkeitsorganisation.

Postanschrift: Herz eines Hirten Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625.

Sie können eine E-Mail sendenHeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com für weitere Informationen zu diesem täglichen hingebungsvollen Dienst.

A Failure to Thrive: A Tragic Case of Spiritual Undernourishment (Hebrews 5; Hebrews 6)

Click on this link for translations of today’s devotion.

Scripture reading – Hebrews 5; Hebrews 6

Our study of the Epistle to the Hebrews continues with Hebrews 5 and 6. After a review, our devotional will be taken from Hebrews 5.

The writer of Hebrews had challenged believers regarding the preeminence of Jesus Christ (Hebrews 1). Understanding the majesty of Christ gave cause for 1st century saints to be stirred in their spirit, knowing all He suffered for their sins. Jesus is the Son of God, yet, He set aside the outward manifestation of His heavenly glory, and “was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death” (2:9). By His death on the Cross, He tasted “death for every man” (2:9b), and by His resurrection from the dead, He became the “captain [and author] of salvation” (2:10).

Hebrews 3 warned the Hebrews to realize the danger of unbelief, and hardening their hearts (3:7-19). With the challenge, “exhort one another daily” (3:13), sinners were urged to believe, or they would never find rest for their souls (3:18). We were reminded there are three requisites for peace and rest: The first was to fear and revere God (4:1). Secondly, hear the Gospel (4:2), believe, and come to the Lord by faith (4:2-11). Finally, to find rest for the soul, a believer must fight, literally labor diligently in the Scriptures: “For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” (4:12).

Because Christ is the believer’s “high priest” (4:15), the writer of Hebrews urged, “Let us come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (4:16). On what grounds might we enter into God’s presence with our petitions? Not on the basis of our works (for “our righteousness are as filthy rags,” Isaiah 64:6), but on the grounds of Christ’s righteousness being credited to our account, and paying our sin debt in full! Hallelujah, what a great Savior and high priest.

Hebrews 5

Hebrews 5 offered a contrast between the high priest “ordained for men” and the Great High Priest, Jesus Christ (5:1). Even the most dedicated, conscientious high priests dared not approach God without offering a sacrifice for his sins (5:2-3). While the high priest was chosen among men, God declared of Christ, “Thou art my Son, to day have I begotten thee…Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” (Melchisedec had been a king and priest of ancient Jerusalem, and a type or example of Christ, 5:5-6).

If you remember Jesus’ agony in the Garden of Gethsemane, before He was betrayed and arrested, you will understand Hebrews 5:7-10. In the Garden, Jesus prayed, “O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me” (meaning the cup of suffering He would soon face, Matthew 26:39). He prayed a second time, “O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done” (Matthew 26:42). It is that agony we find portrayed in Hebrews 5, when we read: “he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared; 8Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered” (5:7-8).

Christ obeyed His Father’s will, and suffered the penalty of our sins (5:8), and being the perfect sinless sacrifice. “He became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him” (obedience implying one’s faith, proven by works, 5:9).

Closing thoughts (5:11-14) – Our study of Hebrews 5 concludes with a case of spiritual undernourishment. In a mournful, regrettable tone, the writer observed in the 1st century congregation a spiritual tragedy that is mirrored in the 21st century church: A failure to thrive spiritually. As today, there were some who professed salvation, but whose lives were spiritually anemic. They evidenced little to no spiritual appetite, and the diagnosis was summed up in this: “ye are dull of hearing” (5:11).

Rather than be teachers of the word, they were content with elementary doctrines, and “first principles of the oracles of God” (5:12). They had failed the Lord, and His people, for they remained in the spiritual nursery (5:13), and unable to delight in the advanced doctrines and studies of the Word (5:14). Their spiritual immaturity had left them vulnerable and unable to “discern both good and evil” (5:14).

Tragically, is that not the sad portrait of many 21st century believers and churches?

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization.

Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625.

You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Vous cherchez la paix? (Hébreux 3 ; Hébreux 4)

Lecture biblique – Hébreux 3 ; Hébreux 4  

The following is a “Kovert” software translation of today’s devotional, from the original English into French, by Travis D. Smith, Pastor and Author of http://www.HeartofAShepherd.com devotionals. I have been told the translations are 97% accurate. For translations of recent devotionals, go to Heart of A Shepherd-Kovert.

Nous continuons notre voyage à travers l’épître aux Hébreux, et trouvons plusieurs des grandes doctrines de notre foi enregistrées dans les chapitres 3 et 4. Nous avons remarqué dans Hébreux 1 la prééminence de Christ (Hébreux 1:1-3), sa supériorité sur les anges (Hébreux 1 :4-6) et sa nature divine (Hébreux 1 :7-14). Dans Hébreux 2, nous avons considéré l’appel de Dieu pour que les hommes entendent et tiennent compte des vérités de la Parole de Dieu (Hébreux 2:1-5). Hébreux 2 déclare également la majesté de Christ, dont la mort et la résurrection ont rendu possible notre salut et notre sanctification (Hébreux 2 :6-13).

Finalement, le Christ est descendu du ciel et est devenu « chair et sang… afin que par [sa] mort il [le Christ] détruise celui qui avait le pouvoir de la mort, c’est-à-dire le diable » (Hébreux 2 :14). Bien que jamais moins que Dieu, Christ « a pris sur lui la postérité d’Abraham » et s’est fait homme (Hébreux 2 :16). Par sa mort et sa résurrection, les croyants sont délivrés de la « crainte de la mort [et] leur vie est soumise à la servitude » (être esclaves du péché ; Hébreux 2 :15a). Jésus-Christ est devenu « un souverain sacrificateur miséricordieux et fidèle » (Hébreux 2 :17), qui est compatissant et miséricordieux, parce qu’il a aussi été tenté et éprouvé (Hébreux 2 :18), mais sans péché.

Hébreux 3

La supériorité de Christ par rapport à Moïse (Hébreux 3 :1-6) 

Comprenant le caractère sans péché de Christ, l’auteur a déclaré que Christ était le supérieur “Apôtre et Souverain Sacrificateur” (3:1). Maintenant, les lecteurs hébreux du 1er siècle se seraient demandé, supérieur à qui ? La réponse – supérieur à Moïse, le grand législateur, à tous égards (Hébreux 3:2-6).

 Moïse était estimé pour sa fidélité à l’Éternel (Nombres 12: 7-8); cependant, même lui n’était pas sans faute ni péché. Jésus-Christ, cependant, était fidèle en tout (Jean 8 :29 ; 17 :4-5). Tandis que Moïse était honoré par Ses frères, Christ était plus glorieux en tant qu’Apôtre Divin et Souverain Sacrificateur (3:3). En comparant l’univers à une maison, Christ a été identifié comme le Constructeur\Créateur de la maison, tandis que Moïse était un résident de ce qu’Il a construit (Hébreux 3 :3b-4). Bien que Moïse ait été « fidèle dans toute sa maison, comme serviteur » ; Christ était plus, car Il est “un Fils sur Sa propre maison” (l’assemblée du peuple de Dieu, Hébreux 3:5-6).

Désirer du repos, mais n’en trouver aucun (Hébreux 3:7-19)

Remarquez que le “repos” devient le sujet de l’équilibre du chapitre 3, et est le thème principal du chapitre 4. Sous l’inspiration du Saint-Esprit (Hébreux 3:7), l’auteur d’Hébreux a averti les hommes du danger d’endurcir leur cœur. (refusant de croire la révélation de Dieu et rejetant Christ). Ceux qui rejettent le SEIGNEUR ont été avertis qu’ils ne trouveraient pas de repos pour leurs âmes (Hébreux 3:7-12).

Un point d’explication: Certains pourraient supposer que le « repos » est une cessation de l’activité physique, mais ce « repos » n’est pas le sujet de ce passage. Par exemple : le corps d’un homme peut être au repos, tandis que son cœur est pris au piège par des pensées, des émotions et des chagrins qui s’emballent. Les pécheurs aspirent au repos, mais n’en trouvent pas en dehors de Dieu. Ils cherchent à calmer l’agitation de leurs âmes avec la psychologie et la psychothérapie. Ils se tournent vers les loisirs, les divertissements, la drogue, l’alcool et l’immoralité grossière pour émousser leur esprit agité. Tragiquement, leurs cœurs sont endurcis « par la tromperie du péché » (Hébreux 3 : 13) et ils ne trouvent pas de repos. Pas étonnant que l’auteur d’Hébreux ait exhorté ses lecteurs à « s’exhorter les uns les autres chaque jour » (Hébreux 3:13a).

Hébreux 4 – Une invitation et une promesse de repos

En bref, le « repos » est le thème principal du chapitre 4 (vs. 1, 3-5, 8-11). Remarquez le repos promis à ceux qui craignaient (vénéraient) le Seigneur (Hébreux 4:1), étaient des gens de foi (ayant entendu et cru l’Evangile, 4:2-10), et combattaient (“travaillaient… pour entrer dans ce repos », Hébreux 4:11).

Réflexions finales – J’hésite à conclure la dévotion d’aujourd’hui, mais avec votre bénédiction, je prendrai la liberté d’attirer votre attention sur Hébreux 4:11.  

Un proverbe anglais dit, “De bonnes choses arrivent à ceux qui attendent.” Bien que cet adage puisse être une théorie utile pour certains, il ne s’applique pas dans le domaine spirituel de l’âme d’un homme. Les hommes ont tendance à aller à l’extrême dans la poursuite du repos. Certains ont l’idée erronée que le repos est inactivité, voire passivité. D’autres s’adonnent à une frénésie et appellent cela un ministère. Terminons et considérons ce que nous avons appris : Trois il faut des choses pour trouver le repos que Dieu promet à ses enfants : Nous devons craindre Dieu (Hébreux 4 : 1), avoir foi en lui et en ses promesses (Hébreux 4 : 2-10) et lutter (travailler) afin de pouvoir entrer dans Son repos (Hébreux 4:11).

La vie du croyant exige de la diligence et est souvent épuisante. Pas étonnant que Paul ait exhorté Timothée : « Prêche la parole ; être instantané en saison, hors saison » (2 Timothée 4:2a).

* Vous pouvez devenir un abonné régulier des dévotions quotidiennes du Cœur de berger, et les recevoir directement sur votre adresse e-mail. Veuillez entrer votre adresse e-mail dans la case à droite (si vous utilisez un ordinateur) ou en bas (si vous utilisez un téléphone portable).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc est reconnu par l’Internal Revenue Service comme un 501c3 et est un organisme de bienfaisance public.

Adresse postale : Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625.

Vous pouvez envoyer un e-mailHeartofASherdInc@gmail.com pour plus d’informations sur ce ministère de dévotion quotidien.

Looking for Peace? (Hebrews 3; Hebrews 4)

Click on this link for translations of today’s devotion.

Scripture reading – Hebrews 3; Hebrews 4

We continue our journey through the Epistle to the Hebrews, and find many of the great doctrines of our faith recorded in chapters 3 and 4. We noticed in Hebrews 1 the preeminence of Christ (1:1-3), His superiority over the angels (1:4-6), and His divine nature (1:7-14). In Hebrews 2, we considered God’s call for men to hear and heed the truths of God’s Word (2:1-5). Hebrews 2 also declares the majesty of Christ, whose death and resurrection made possible our salvation and sanctification (2:6-13).

Finally, Christ descended from heaven, and became “flesh and blood… that through [His] death He [Christ] might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil” (2:14). Though never less than God, Christ “took on him the seed of Abraham,” and became man (2:16). Through His death, and resurrection, believers are delivered from the “fear of death [and] their lifetime subject to bondage” (being slaves to sin; 2:15a). Jesus Christ became “a merciful and faithful high priest” (2:17), Who is compassionate and merciful, because He was also tempted and tested (2:18), yet without sin.

Hebrews 3

The Superiority of Christ Compared to Moses (3:1-6)

Understanding Christ’s sinless character, the author declared Christ to be the superior “Apostle and High Priest” (3:1). Now, the Hebrew readers of the 1st century would have wondered, superior to whom? The answer–superior to Moses, the great law giver, in every way (3:2-6).

Moses was esteemed for his faithfulness to the LORD (Numbers 12:7-8); however, even he was not without fault or sin. Jesus Christ, however, was faithful in everything (John 8:29; 17:4-5). While Moses was honored by His brethren, Christ was more glorious as the Divine Apostle and High Priest (3:3). Likening the universe to a house, Christ was identified as the Builder\Creator of the house, while Moses was a resident of that which He built (3:3b-4). Though Moses was “faithful in all his house, as servant;” Christ was more, for He is “a Son over His own house” (the congregation of God’s people, 3:5-6).

Longing for Rest, But Finding None (3:7-19)

Notice “rest” becomes the subject of the balance of chapter 3, and is the primary theme of chapter 4. Under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit (3:7), the writer of Hebrews warned men of the danger of hardening their hearts (refusing to believe God’s revelation, and rejecting Christ). Those who reject the LORD, were warned they would not find rest for their souls (3:7-12).

A point of explanation: Some might suppose “rest” is a cessation of physical activity, but that “rest” is not the subject of this passage. For instance: A man’s body might be at rest, while his heart is ensnared by racing thoughts, emotions, and sorrows. Sinners long for rest, but find none apart from God. They seek to quiet the restlessness of their souls with psychology, and psychotherapy. They turn to recreation, amusements, drugs, alcohol, and gross immorality to dull their restless spirit. Tragically, their hearts are hardened “through the deceitfulness of sin” (3:13), and they find no rest. No wonder the writer of Hebrews exhorted his readers, “exhort one another daily” (3:13a).

Hebrews 4 – An Invitation and Promise of Rest

Briefly, “rest” is the primary theme of chapter 4 (vss. 1, 3-5, 8-11). Notice the rest promised to those who feared(revered) the Lord (4:1), were people of faith (having heard and believed the Gospel, 4:2-10), and fought(“laboured…to enter into that rest,” 4:11).

Closing thoughts – I hesitate to conclude today’s devotional, but with your blessing, I will take liberty to draw your attention to Hebrews 4:11.

An English proverb states, “Good things come to those who wait.” While that adage might be a useful theory for some, it does not apply in the spiritual realm of a man’s soul. Men tend to go to extremes in pursuing rest. Some have the mistaken notion that rest is inactivity, even passivity. Others work themselves into a frenzy, and call it ministry. Let’s close and consider what we have learned: Three things are required to find the rest God promises His children: We are to fear God (4:1), have faith in Him and His promises (4:2-10), and fight (labor) that we might enter into His rest (4:11).

The life of the believer requires diligence, and is often exhausting. No wonder Paul exhorted Timothy, “2Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season” (2 Timothy 4:2a).

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Je größer das Licht, desto größer das Gericht! (Hebräer 1; Hebräer 2)

The following is an example of the German translation of today’s devotional using “Konvert” software, and edited by a dear German friend.

Schriftlesung – Hebräer 1; Hebräer 2  

Die heutige Andacht setzt unseren Countdown bis zum Abschluss unseres zweijährigen chronologischen Leseplans fort und stellt dir vor den Brief an die Hebräer.

Der Autor der Hebräer

Viele haben vermutet das der Brief an die Hebräer wurde vom Apostel Paulus geschrieben; Ich denke jedoch, dass dies bestenfalls eine Vermutung ist. Wenn Paul der Autor war, hat er es versäumt, sich in der Eröffnungsanrede zu erkennen zu geben wie er es in seinen anderen Briefen getan hat (Römer 1:1; 1. Korinther 1:1; 2. Korinther 1:1; Galater 1:1 und so weiter). Anstatt über den menschlichen Autor zu spekulieren, begnügen wir uns damit, den zu akzeptieren Brief an die Hebräer, wie alle Schriften: göttlich inspiriert und ihr Urheber der Heilige Geist (2. Timotheus 3,15; 2. Petrus 1,20-21).

Das Datum des Briefes an die Hebräer

Das Datum für das Schreiben des Hebräerbriefes ist ungewiss; Die meisten Gelehrten scheinen sich jedoch einig zu sein, dass es für hebräische Gläubige vor 70 n. Chr. Komponiert wurde, als der römische General Titus Jerusalem belagerte und die Stadt und der Tempel zerstört wurden. Vor diesem Datum waren Verfolgung und Gefangenschaft im Römischen Reich weit verbreitet, und aus Hebräer 13:23 geht hervor, dass Timotheus, der „Sohn im Glauben“ des Paulus (2. Timotheus 1:2), selbst inhaftiert war und bald „ freigelassen“ wird(Hebräer 13:23).

Die Empfänger des Briefes an die Hebräer

Wie im Titel angegeben, richtete sich der Hebräerbrief an Menschen mit hebräischem Hintergrund und gab zweifellos vielen Juden Anlass, Jesus Christus als die Erfüllung der messianischen Prophezeiungen des Alten Testaments zu betrachten. Für andere mögen Leiden und Verfolgung des 1. Jahrhunderts dazu geführt haben, dass einige an ihrem Glauben an Christus zweifeln und zum Tempel und zu Opfergaben zurückkehren (Hebräer 10:1-11). Ihnen verkündete der Heilige Geist durch einen menschlichen Autor die Vorherrschaft Jesu Christi in allen Dingen (Hebräer 1:1-4; 10:12-13).

Wenn man das Datum der Hebräer auf Mitte bis Ende der 60er Jahre n. Chr. festlegt, waren viele Leser wahrscheinlich Gläubige der zweiten Generation hebräischer Abstammung. Tragischerweise stellt der Autor sie wegen ihrer geistlichen Unreife zur Rede und beschrieb sie als „schwerhörig“ (Hebräer 5:11) und bedürftig nach Lehrern, obwohl sie eigentlich hätten lehren sollen (Hebräer 5:12).

Ein kurzer Abriss von Hebräer 1 und 2 muss für unser Studium ausreichen.

Hebräer 1 – Die Vorherrschaft Jesu Christi

Im Laufe der Jahrhunderte sandte Gott Seine Propheten nach Israel, um Seine Person zu offenbaren und Sein Wort zu verkünden (Hebräer 1,1). Doch der Zweck des Kommens der Propheten war es, den Weg für das Kommen der ultimativen Offenbarung Gottes zu bereiten … seines Sohnes (Hebräer 1,2). Die Propheten und Verfasser der Heiligen Schrift wiesen nicht nur auf die Schöpfung als Demonstration des Werks Gottes hin (Psalm 19:1; 97:6), sondern sie verkündeten seine Offenbarung in Wort und Schrift, während sein Geist sie bewegte (2. Timotheus 3:15 ; 2 Petrus 1:20-21). Doch das Werk der Propheten war unvollständig.

Das Kommen von Jesus Christus erfüllte nicht nur die Verheißungen eines kommenden Messias-Erlösers (Jesaja 53; Lukas 19:10), sondern Er offenbarte in Seiner Menschwerdung (Menschenfleisch) die Herrlichkeit Gottes des Vaters (Hebräer 1:2-3). . Jesus Christus, der Sohn Gottes, wird als „Erbe aller Dinge“ und Schöpfer offenbart (Hebräer 1,2b). Er war der „Glanz“ der Herrlichkeit Gottes (1:3a), das Ebenbild Gottes, verhüllt in menschlichem Fleisch (Hebräer 1:3b; Kolosser 1:15; Philipper 2:6, 9), und der Erhalter (der Erhalter von „ alles“, Hebräer 1:3c). Durch das Vergießen Seines Blutes und den Tod am Kreuz hat Jesus „unsere Sünden reingewaschen“, wie es heißt Erlöser (Hebräer 1:3d) und dann „setzte sich zur Rechten der Majestät in der Höhe [Gott des Vaters]“ (Hebräer 1:3e). Christus wird als Herr und Mittler der Sünder erhöht (1. Timotheus 2,5; Hebräer 10,12).

Der Rest von Hebräer 1 erklärt die Vorrangstellung Christi über Engel (Hebräer 1:4-7) und Seine Person als ewiger Gott und Souverän der Schöpfung (Hebräer 1:7-14).

Hebräer 2 – Die Gefahr, die eigene Errettung zu vernachlässigen

Hebräer 2 warnte, dass Gott die Menschen für die Wahrheiten, die ihnen gelehrt wurden, verantwortlich macht (Hebräer 2:1-3). Christus lehrte: „Denn wem viel gegeben ist, von dem wird viel verlangt werden; und wem man viel anvertraut hat, von dem werden sie umso mehr verlangen“ (Lukas 12,48). Dieselbe Wahrheit anders ausgedrückt: Je größer das Licht, desto größer das Gericht!

Die Hebräer hatten das Privileg der Schriften des Alten Testaments und des Wortes der Propheten. Gott sandte dann seinen Sohn Jesus nach Israel, um Gottes Liebe und das Evangelium seiner Gnade zu verkünden. Der Autor argumentierte: „Wie sollen wir entrinnen, wenn wir eine so große Errettung vernachlässigen; was am Anfang vom Herrn zu sprechen begann?“ (Hebräer 2:3).

Abschließende Gedanken – Es könnte noch so viel mehr in Betracht gezogen werden, aber ich schließe unser Studium mit der Einladung, Hebräer 2:1 zu betrachten, wo wir lesen: „Darum sollten wir den Dingen, die wir gehört haben, umso ernsthaftere Beachtung schenken, damit wir es nicht jemals tun sollten, sie entgleiten lassen.“ (Hebräer 2:1).

Wenn wir verstehen, dass diese Worte an Hebräer geschrieben wurden, die umfangreiche Kenntnisse der alttestamentlichen Schriften hatten, verstehen wir die Dringlichkeit, das Wort Gottes nicht nur zu hören, sondern seine Wahrheit zu beachten. Sicherlich könnte die gleiche Warnung den Gläubigen des 21. Jahrhunderts ausgesprochen werden. Warnung: Es besteht eine große Gefahr für diejenigen, die das Vorrecht hatten, mit der Predigt des Wortes Gottes und der Verkündigung des Evangeliums aufzuwachsen. Es ist die Gefahr, die Wahrheit zu hören und nicht zu beachten. Der Schreiber warnte: „Damit wir sie nicht entgleiten lassen“ (Hebräer 2:1). Einige, die vorgaben, Nachfolger Christi zu sein, waren ausgerutscht, hatten es versäumt, die Wahrheit zu beachten, und trieben von ihrer spirituellen Verankerung (Lehre) ab (Rückfall).

Was ist mit Ihnen? Bist du in Gottes Wort verankert, oder bist du davon gerutscht und treibst geistlich ab? Haben Sie zugelassen, dass Popularität, Vergnügen, Lüste, Geschäftigkeit, sündhafter Stolz oder Faulheit Sie ausrutschen lassen? Willst du dich nicht von deiner Sünde abwenden und zum Herrn zurückkehren?

* Sie können ein regelmäßiger Abonnent der täglichen Andachten von Heart of a Shepherd werden und diese direkt an Ihre E-Mail-Adresse senden lassen. Sie können anfordern, dass eine Einladung an Ihre E-Mail-Adresse gesendet wird, indem Sie eine E-Mail an HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com senden. Sie können Ihre E-Mail-Adresse auch in das Feld rechts (bei Verwendung eines Computers) oder unten (bei Verwendung eines Mobiltelefons) eingeben.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc ist vom Internal Revenue Service als 501c3 anerkannt und eine öffentliche Wohltätigkeitsorganisation.

Postanschrift:Heart of A Shepherd Inc., 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625.

Sie können eine E-Mail an HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com senden, um weitere Informationen zu diesem täglichen hingebungsvollen Dienst zu erhalten.

The Greater the Light, the Greater the Judgment! (Hebrews 1; Hebrews 2)

Click on this link for translations of today’s devotion.

Scripture reading – Hebrews 1; Hebrews 2

Continuing our countdown to the conclusion of our two-year chronological Scriptures’ reading schedule, today’s devotional introduces the Epistle to the Hebrews.

The Author of Hebrews

Many have supposed the Epistle to the Hebrews was written by the apostle Paul; however, I feel that is conjecture at best. If Paul was the author, he neglected to identify himself in the opening salutation as was his manner in his other epistles (Romans 1:1; 1 Corinthians 1:1; 2 Corinthians 1:1; Galatians 1:1; and so on). Rather than speculate on the human author, let us content ourselves in accepting the Epistle to the Hebrews, like all Scripture: divinely inspired and its author the Holy Spirit (2 Timothy 3:15; 2 Peter 1:20-21).

The Date of the Epistle to the Hebrews

The date for the writing of Hebrews is uncertain; however, it seems most scholars agree it was composed for Hebrew believers before A.D. 70, when the Roman general Titus besieged Jerusalem, and the city and Temple were destroyed. Before that date, persecution and imprisonment were widespread in the Roman empire, and Hebrews 13:23 indicates that Timothy, Paul’s “son in the faith” (2 Timothy 1:2), had himself been imprisoned, and was expected to soon be “set at liberty” (Hebrews 13:23).

The Recipients of the Epistle to the Hebrews

As stated in its title, Hebrews was addressed to those from a Hebrew background, and no doubt gave many of Judaism pause to consider Jesus Christ as the fulfillment of Old Testament messianic prophecies.  For others, sufferings and persecution of the 1st century might have caused some to doubt their faith in Christ, and return to the Temple and sacrificial offerings (Hebrews 10:1-11). To them, the Holy Spirit, through a human author, declared the supremacy of Jesus Christ in all things (Hebrews 1:1-4; 10:12-13).

Setting the date of Hebrews to the mid to late 60’s A.D., many readers were probably second-generation believers of Hebrew ancestry. Tragically, the author takes them to task for their spiritual immaturity, and described them as “dull of hearing” (5:11), and in need of teachers when they should have been teaching (5:12).

A brief outline of Hebrews 1 and 2 will need to suffice for our study.

Hebrews 1 – The Supremacy of Jesus Christ

Down through the centuries, God sent His prophets to Israel to reveal His person and declare His Word (1:1). Yet, the purpose in the coming of the prophets was to prepare the way for the coming of the ultimate revelation of God…His Son (1:2). The prophets and writers of Scripture not only pointed to creation as a demonstration of the handiwork of God (Psalm 19:1; 97:6), but they declared His revelation in word and writing as His Spirit moved them (2 Timothy 3:15; 2 Peter 1:20-21). Yet, the work of the prophets was partial.

The coming of Jesus Christ fulfilled not only the promises of a coming Messiah-Redeemer (Isaiah 53; Luke 19:10), but He revealed in His incarnation (human flesh) the glory of God the Father (1:2-3). Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is revealed as “heir of all things,” and the Creator (1:2b). He was the “brightness” of God’s glory (1:3a), the image of God veiled in human flesh (1:3b; Colossians 1:15; Philippians 2:6, 9), and the Sustainer (the upholder of “all things,” 1:3c). By the shedding of His blood and death on the cross, Jesus “purged our sins,” as Redeemer (1:3d), and then “sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high [God the Father]” (1:3e). Christ is exalted as Lord and Mediator of sinners (1 Timothy 2:5; Hebrews 10:12).

The balance of Hebrews 1 declared Christ’s preeminence over angels (1:4-7), and His person as Eternal God, and Sovereign of Creation (1:7-14).

Hebrews 2 – The Danger of Neglecting One’s Salvation

Hebrews 2 warned, God holds men accountable for the truths they have been taught (2:1-3). Christ taught, “For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more” (Luke 12:48). Stating the same truth in another way: The greater the light, the greater the judgment!

The Hebrews had the privilege of the Old Testament Scriptures, and the word of prophets. God then sent His Son, Jesus to Israel, to declare God’s love and the Gospel of His grace. The author reasoned: “How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord?” (2:3).

Closing thoughts – So much more could be considered, but I conclude our study inviting you to consider Hebrews 2:1, where we read: “Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip” (2:1).

Understanding those words were penned to Hebrews who had extensive knowledge of the Old Testament Scriptures, we understand the urgency to not only hear the Word of God, but heed its Truth. Surely that same warning might be declared to 21st century believers. Warning: There is a grave danger for those who have been privileged to grow up hearing the Word of God preached and the Gospel declared. It is the danger of hearing, and not heeding Truth. The writer warned, “lest at any time we should let them slip” (2:1). Some who professed to be followers of Christ, had slipped, failed to heed the Truth, and were drifting away (backsliding) from their spiritual moorings (doctrine).

What about you? Are you anchored to God’s Word, or have you slipped away and are spiritually adrift? Have you allowed popularity, pleasures, lusts, busyness, sinful pride, or laziness cause you to slip? Won’t you turn from your sin, and return to the Lord?

* You can become a regular subscriber of the Heart of a Shepherd daily devotionals, and have them sent directly to your email address. Please enter your email address in the box to the right (if using a computer) or at the bottom (if using a cell phone).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

El pastor: su papel, responsabilidad y recompensa (1 Pedro 5; Hebreos 1) (Spanish Translation)

 

The following is an example of the Spanish translation of today’s devotional using “Konvert” software. I have been told the translation is about 97% accurate.

Lectura bíblica – 1 Pedro 5; Hebreos 1

Recordatorio – 1 de enero de 2023 marcará el comienzo de una nueva serie de estudios cronológicos de 2 años en la Palabra de Dios. Dios mediante, Heart of a Shepherd Inc. se alojará en un nuevo sitio web, y los suscriptores recibirán devocionales diarios en su casilla de correo electrónico. Además, el sitio web contará con video devocionales y un “enlace para niños” a historias bíblicas. Suscríbase hoy enviando su solicitud a HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com.

 ¡Hoy marca el primer día del último mes de nuestro viaje cronológico de dos años a través de las Escrituras! Aplaudo a quienes han participado en este “maratón espiritual” de estudio de la Palabra de Dios. Confío en que compartas conmigo una sensación de logro y regocijo. El autor del Salmo 119 escribió: “¡Cuán dulces son a mi paladar tus palabras! ¡Sí, más dulce que la miel para mi boca!” (119:103); ¡de hecho ellos son!

 La lectura de las Escrituras de hoy concluye la Primera Epístola de Pedro y presenta el Libro de Hebreos (que muchos sugieren que fue escrito por Pablo; sin embargo, eso es mera especulación). Este devocional será tomado de 1 Pedro 5:1-4.

Una revisión de 1 Pedro 1-4

 Les señalé en un devocional anterior de 1 Pedro, la naturaleza práctica de la carta del apóstol a los “extranjeros esparcidos” (1 Pedro 1:1), creyentes que habían sido alejados de su familia, amigos y país por la persecución. Pedro, ahora un anciano, tenía la carga de que los creyentes no solo conocieran las Escrituras, sino que las vivieran. Después de recordarles quiénes eran en Cristo (elegidos, escogidos y santificados, 1 Pedro 1:2), los desafió a dejar de lado los pecados que los asediaban (1 Pedro 2:1) y a “desear la leche sincera de la palabra”. , para que [ellos] crezcan de ese modo” (1 Pedro 2:2). Haciéndose eco de las palabras del salmista, Pedro afirmó: “Si es que habéis gustado la misericordia del Señor” (1 Pedro 2:3).

En el capítulo 3, Pedro encargó a los creyentes con respecto a las relaciones maritales (1 Pedro 3:1-7) y las interrelaciones con creyentes y no creyentes en el mundo (1 Pedro 3:8-22). Comprender que los santos dispersos enfrentarían sufrimientos, persecuciones e incluso la muerte… Pedro exhortó a los creyentes a soportar las injusticias (1 Pedro 4:1-6), amarse unos a otros fervientemente (1 Pedro 4:8-11) y esperar hasta el final. ! (4:12-19)

1 Pedro 5

Aunque solo tiene 14 versículos, el capítulo 5 rebosa de cargos, exhortaciones, estímulos y un desafío para que los sufrimientos de Cristo nos animen (5:10-11). Sin embargo, debo limitar mi enfoque a los primeros cuatro versículos, y lo que considero que es el desafío de Pedro a los pastores (“ancianos”) de las iglesias (5:1-4). Comprender que el papel principal del pastor es el de un pastor espiritual (por conduce, alimenta, guía y protege a las ovejas), era fundamental que los hombres maduros, llamados por el Señor, fueran ordenados en las iglesias. Escribiendo a los creyentes, Pedro abordó el papel, la responsabilidad y la recompensa del pastor.

El papel del pastor (1 Pedro 5:1)

 El pastor fue descrito como un “anciano”, ya que ningún novicio debía ser ordenado (1 Timoteo 3:6). En la cultura judía y griega, un “anciano” era un hombre mayor, alguien que era respetado y honrado en su hogar, congregación y sociedad.

 El papel del “anciano” se definía mediante tres títulos: “obispo”, que significa supervisor (1 Pedro 2:25; 1 Timoteo 3:2; Tito 1:7); “Pastor”, la palabra para pastor (Efesios 4:11); y “Ancianos”, enfatizando la madurez espiritual necesaria para el ministerio (1 Pedro 5:1; 1 Timoteo 5:19; 2 Juan 1; 3 Juan 1). Con la humildad característica de los apóstoles, el apóstol Pedro se identificó como “anciano” (1 Pedro 5:1b). Sus credenciales y autoridad se resumieron en esto: “testigo de los padecimientos de Cristo, y también participante de la gloria que ha de ser revelada” (1 Pedro 5:1c). Había sido testigo ocular de la vida, el ministerio, los milagros, la muerte, la resurrección y la gloriosa ascensión de Cristo al cielo.

La Responsabilidad del Pastor (1 Pedro 5:2-3)

 Pedro encargó a los pastores espirituales que “apacientan la grey de Dios que está entre vosotros” (1 Pedro 5:2a). El trabajo del pastor es alimentar a un rebaño que abarca la responsabilidad de guiar, proteger y proveer alimento (Salmo 23). El mismo es el llamamiento del pastor, pues ha de guiar, proteger y nutrir espiritualmente a los creyentes a su cargo.

 El apóstol luego se refirió a la actitud del pastor, escribiendo, “no por fuerza, sino de buena gana; no por ganancias deshonestas, sino de ánimo dispuesto” (1 Pedro 5:2b). El corazón de un buen pastor no necesita ser forzado a la obra del ministerio, sino que está dispuesto, motivado y, como desafió Pablo, “en el momento oportuno, fuera de tiempo” (2 Timoteo 4:2). Sirve a su llamado con afán, y no para enriquecerse (1 Pedro 5:2b).

 El pastor/pastor debe ser un modelo, un ejemplo de siervo (1 Pedro 5:3). Los pastores deben predicar con el ejemplo, no como “señores” (1 Pedro 5:3a). No son amos que ejercen autoridad absoluta, sino pastores “sobre la heredad de Dios…ejemplos para el rebaño” (1 Pedro 5:3b). Los creyentes son la “herencia”, es decir, la herencia de Dios (1 Pedro 5:3b), y los pastores deben ser modelos, “ejemplos para el rebaño” (1 Pedro 5:3c). ¿Qué son para modelar? La semejanza de Cristo, fruto del Espíritu (Gálatas 5:22-23), y el carácter y las acciones de amor (1 Corintios 13:4-8a).

La recompensa del pastor (1 Pedro 5:4)

 La suma del desafío de Pedro a los “ancianos” fue recordarles que su labor en la Palabra, las dificultades, los desafíos y las penas serían recompensados cuando Jesucristo, el “Principe de los pastores, apareciera” (1 Pedro 5:4a). En la segunda venida de Cristo, los pastores fieles “recibirán una corona de gloria inmarcesible” (1 Pedro 5:4b). ¡Una corona terrenal es temporal, pero la recompensa que Pedro prometió a los pastores fieles era eterna!

 ¡Qué maravilloso incentivo para los pastores fieles y dedicados! No solo hemos recibido un gran llamado, sino que se nos promete “¡una corona de gloria!”

 * Puede convertirse en un suscriptor regular de los devocionales diarios del Corazón de un Pastor y recibirlos directamente en su dirección de correo electrónico. Ingrese su dirección de correo electrónico en el cuadro a la derecha (si usa una computadora) o en la parte inferior (si usa un teléfono celular).

 Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc está reconocida por el Servicio de Impuestos Internos como 501c3 y es una organización benéfica pública.

Dirección postal: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625.

Puede enviar un correo electrónico a HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com para obtener más información sobre este ministerio devocional diario.