The End is the Beginning (Joshua 1-4)

Scripture Reading Assignment: Joshua 1-4

In his book on Spiritual Leadership, J. Oswald Sanders observes concerning the death of great leaders:

“When a movement develops around a dominant personality, the real test of the quality of his leadership is the manner in which that work survives the crisis of his removal.” [Moody Press, 1967, p. 210]

The death of God’s servants never takes God by surprise. The leader’s family will be shaken and mourn. His co-laborers may be dismayed at the loss. His followers, no doubt, shaken by his sudden removal. God’s work is not built upon dominant personalities and no leader is indispensable. Ministries will be blessed as long as God’s purposes are accomplished.

When Moses died, Joshua, his successor, and Israel acutely felt the loss of their leader (Deuteronomy 34:7-9). Some might have despaired. Others may have panicked and asked: “What will we do without Moses?” Many were dismayed that God would remove Moses just as they faced the greatest test of their nation’s life – crossing the Jordan River and taking possession of Canaan.

Joshua 1 – God’s Work Did Not End with the Death of Moses

Alexander Maclaren writes, “No man is indispensable. God’s work goes on uninterrupted. The instruments are changed but the Master’s hand is the same, and lays one tool aside and takes another out of the tool-chest as He will.”  [Alexander Maclaren, Expositions of Holy Scripture, Southern Baptist Convention, p. 87]

For thirty days Israel had mourned the death of Moses, but when that time was passed the LORD wasted no time and commanded Joshua: “2  Moses my servant is dead; now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, thou, and all this people, unto the land which I do give to them, even to the children of Israel” (1:2).

God described the borders of Israel’s Promised Land as the mass of land between Lebanon in the north and the “wilderness” or desert of Arabia in the south; from the river of Euphrates in the east to the Mediterranean Sea in the west (1:4).  The land was inhabited by the “Hittites,” an ancient people known elsewhere as the Canaanites. They were eventually driven out of the land and became assimilated into the nomadic tribes of Arabia.

An indisputable sign of God’s person and sovereignty over the nations is the existence of an ancient, distinct people, not limited to, but known today as Jews. While tribes and nations of ancient times are little more than a footnote in history; the lineage of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob continues.

The LORD reminded Joshua that Israel’s existence as a nation was dependent on the people obeying God’s Law.

Joshua 1:88  This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success.

With the assurance of His blessing, God promised Joshua, “the LORD thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest” (1:9). The order to prepare being given (1:10-11), Joshua reminded the two and one-half tribes that had requested the lands on the east side of the Jordan for an inheritance, of the obligation of their men to cross over the Jordan and battle beside the other tribes until the land was secured (1:12-18).

Joshua 2 – A Harlot’s Step of Faith

Two spies were sent over to view the land and investigate the city of Jericho and its defenses. Providentially taking refuge in the lodge of a harlot named Rahab (2:1), their presence in that ancient city was soon noticed (2:2-3). Fearing rumors she had heard of all God had done for Israel, Rahab hid the spies on her rooftop and requested they remember her and show grace to her household when Jericho fell to Israel (2:4-14).

Lowering the spies by means of a scarlet rope from a window of her home on the wall, Rahab was instructed to tie the rope in that same window as a sign that she and her household were to be spared (2:15-22).

Delivering the report that the inhabitants of Jericho were terrified, the spies affirmed to Joshua, “Truly the LORD hath delivered into our hands all the land” (2:24).

Joshua 3 – The Order Given to Break Camp

Commanding the tribes to encamp for three days on the shores of the Jordan, Joshua ordered the people to prepare to cross the river (3:1). The Ark of the Covenant, a symbol of the LORD’s presence in their midst, would be carried by priests and lead the way across the Jordan River (3:3-11).  Joshua commanded the people to not only prepare for war, but more importantly, to be sanctified, meaning they were to be ceremonially cleansed and purified before the LORD (3:5).

As the waters of the Red Sea parted before Moses, the waters of the Jordan parted when the priests carrying the Ark stepped into the water (3:12-16). The waters stood up as a wall as Israel crossed to the other side (3:17).

Joshua 4 – A Memorial of Stones in the Midst of the Jordan

When Israel had passed over, Joshua commanded one man from each tribe to take up a stone and establish a memorial to of the dividing of the waters as “a sign among you,” a lasting testimony of what the LORD had wrought (4:1-12).

Safely over the Jordan and for the first time encamped in the Promised Land, forty thousand men were ordered to prepare for battle (4:13).

Though the memory of Moses’ death was still fresh, “the LORD magnified Joshua in the sight of all Israel; and they feared him (revered; respected, reverenced), as they feared Moses, all the days of his life” (4:14).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith