Troubles in Galatia (Galatians 1-3)

Scripture reading – Galatians 1-3

Our chronological reading of the Scriptures brings us to Paul’s epistle to believers living in Galatia (modern Turkey). Galatia, lying due north of the isle of Cyprus, was a Roman province in the 1st century. The Greeks referred to the people of the region as “Gauls” (a name derived from the Latin word, “Gallia”), and they are believed to have been Celtic, a Germanic tribe of western Europe. Major cities of the southern region of Galatia included Antioch of Pisidian, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe.

What was Paul’s purpose in penning this epistle to Galatia?

The content of the letter reveals that false teachers had infiltrated the churches in Galatia, and were calling into question Paul’s credibility and authority as an apostle, and were also undermining the doctrine of grace that was central to the Gospel.

Paul had two objectives in writing the epistle: The first was a defense of his apostleship; The second, a defense and declaration of the Gospel of Grace through Jesus Christ.

Leaving no doubt as to his purpose in writing to Galatian believers, Paul commenced the letter introducing himself as its author, and boldly declaring his apostleship was “not of men, neither by man” (1:1b). In other words, he declared that he did not look to a council of men, nor an ecclesiastical authority. Paul proclaimed that his commission as an apostle was from God, writing: “by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised [having raised] him [Jesus Christ] from the dead;)” (1:1c).

Four Qualifications of an Apostle

The Scriptures reveal that a man had to meet four qualification to be an apostle. The first, he had to have seen the LORD after His resurrection (Acts 1:22; 9:3-5; 22:6-8; 1 Cor. 9:1). Secondly, he had to have received His calling from Christ Himself (Luke 6:13; Acts 9:6; 22:10; Galatians 1:1). The third qualification was that his teaching had to be divinely inspired (John 14:26; 16:13; Acts 9:15; 22:14; 1 Thess. 2:13). Finally, he must evidence the power to perform miracles as a sign of his apostleship (Mark 16:20; Acts 2:43; 14:8-10; 16:18; 10:10-12; 1 Cor. 12:8-11).

Paul met all four of the requisites of a man divinely appointed as an apostle. Not only had he been commissioned “by Jesus Christ” (1:1b), he was called by “God the Father, who raised Him [Jesus Christ] from the dead” (1:1c). He also had the witness of “all the brethren” (1:2), which were traveling with him. Though not named, it is certain the believers in Galatia were aware of those men who labored with Paul.

The Recipients of the Epistle – “unto the churches [assemblies or congregations] of Galatia” (1:2b). The epistle has a general address to the believers of “the churches of Galatia,” and the letter would have been read publicly, and shared with each of their assemblies.

I have merely introduced Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians; however, it is good to note not only who is writing, but also why. Most importantly, however, is to remember that all Scripture is divinely inspired., literally God-breathed.

2 Timothy 3:1616 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith