God is Ever Just and Faithful (Job 7-8)

Scripture reading – Job 7-8

We are continuing our Scripture reading in the Book of Job, and I encourage you to maintain this daily discipline. There are some difficult passages in this study, but I pray God to open your understanding. Remember that Job is in a dark place in life. He has suffered the loss of his possessions (1:14-18), the deaths of his sons and daughters (1:15-19), boils and open sores from his head to his feet (2:7-8), and friends who have judged that he must be guilty of some great wickedness (Job 4-5).

As we have seen in prior devotionals, Job’s friends arrived under the pretense of bringing him pity and compassion (2:11-13). While their presence brought some hope of empathy, their words soon betrayed their prejudice toward Job and his afflictions. Eliphaz was the first friend to speak, and he contended that God blesses the righteous and punishes the wicked. The implication was that Job, despite his plea of innocence, was being afflicted by God for sins he had committed and refused to confess. Job’s response to Eliphaz’s insinuations began in chapter 6, and continues in Job 7.

Job 7 – Failing Hope

Rather than the pity and kindness Job longed for, Eliphaz had added to his sorrows. Dispirited and despairing of life, his thoughts and feelings turned dark, as he reasoned that death alone might bring him relief from his distresses.

I suggest you consider four major divisions to Job 7. Job’s lamentations and despair of life (7:1-6); His reflections on death (7:7-10); His desire for God to show him mercy (7:11-16); and his longing for God to forgive him if his sins were the cause for his afflictions (7:17-21).

Job 8 – The Counsel of Bildad the Shuhite

We are introduced to Bildad the Shuhite, the second of Job’s three friends, in Job 8. Like Eliphaz, Bildad had come “to mourn with [Job] and to comfort” him (2:11); however, his counsel was unsympathetic and severe.

After hearing Job’s reply to Eliphaz, and his plea for God’s mercy, Bildad began to confront him in words that were harsh and judgmental. The tone of his words evidenced the pride of a man who had little experience in trials that bear the fruit of humility. He condemned Job’s lament of his sorrows (8:2), and alleged he was accusing God of being unjust (8:3). Adding to Job’s sorrows was Bildad’s inference that his children had died because they had sinned against God (8:4). Echoing Eliphaz’s counsel, Bildad reasoned if Job was “pure and upright” God would bless him (8:5-7). Bildad suggested if Job had been a sincerely righteous man, God would not have forsaken him: “Behold, God will not cast away a perfect man, Neither will he help the evil doers”(8:20).

Bildad’s counsel was not only lacking in compassion, but his rationale lacked both humility and spiritual discernment. He looked upon Job’s afflictions, and not only failed him as a friend, but added to his sorrows.  His judgments were contrary to the ways of God who is loving, compassionate, longsuffering, and just.

I close with a treasured principle that believers should remember when they or their loved ones face trials:

Romans 8:28 – “28 And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.”

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith