God Will Do as It Pleases Him, Because He is God! (Job 9-10)

Scripture reading – Job 9-10

Bildad made his case, and accused Job of hypocrisy (Job 8), but rather than address Bildad’s harsh judgments, Job directed his lament to God in Job 9. We notice in Job’s defense several references that give us profound insight into the character and attributes of God.

Looking to the God of heaven, Job asked the LORD, “How should a man be just [i.e. justified, righteous, perfect, sinless] with God?” (9:2). The implication is that no man can be “just” or righteous in the sight of God, Who is holy, for He is “wise in heart, and mighty in strength” (9:4a)!

God is the Creator, Sovereign, and the Sustainer of creation (9:5-9). He can remove mountains (9:5), shake the foundations of the earth (9:6), and commands the sun, moon, and stars (9:7).

God does as it pleases Him (9:10-13). His wonders cannot be numbered (9:10), and His ways are invisible (9:11). He is sovereign and “taketh away,” and no man dare say “unto Him, What doest thou?” (9:12)

What are some things Job had seen God take from him? He had lost his health, his family, and his possessions. Even his friends had betrayed him with their harsh judgments.

Job Pleads His Cause (9:14-35)

To interpret the balance of Job 9, I invite you to picture a heavenly courtroom where God is the Judge (9:15), and Job is both the defendant and his own advocate.

Realizing His Judge is altogether Just, and Omniscient, Job acknowledged that God was under no obligation to answer mortal man: “16If I had called, and he had answered me; Yet would I not believe that he had hearkened unto my voice” (9:16).

While not understanding the reason for his troubles, Job believed he was suffering “without cause” (9:17), and not for any particular transgression he had committed. He had searched his heart, and could think of no sin that would deserve so many troubles.  In humility, he acknowledged he had no grounds to protest or declare himself sinless, saying: “20If I justify myself, mine own mouth shall condemn me: If I say, I am perfect, it shall also prove me perverse” (9:20).

Job’s friends had declared his troubles were God’s judgment for some egregious sin he had failed to confess. Job, however, disputed their harsh judgment, testifying, 22This is one thing, therefore I said it, He [God] destroyeth the perfect and the wicked” (9:22).

Jesus made a similar observation in His Sermon on the Mount when He taught His disciples, “45That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for He maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust” (Matthew 5:45).

The same God who sends the sun to shine, and the rain to fall upon sinner and saint, also allows troubles to be the fate of the “perfect and the wicked” (Job 9:22). Why? Because God is God, and does as it pleases Him for His eternal purpose, which is always for my good, and His glory (Romans 8:28).

2 Corinthians 1:3-43 Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort; 4 Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith