God is Just, Merciful, Gracious, and Good (Job 35-36)

Scripture reading – Job 35-36

Job 35 – Elihu’s criticism of Job continues as that angry young man charges him with three improper statements.

The first, that Job had misrepresented religion as unprofitable (35:1-8). Elihu suggested that Job had implied that his “righteousness [was] more than God’s” (35:2). Of course, Job had not verbalized such an outrageous statement, but Elihu had supposed that was the implication of his testimony of innocence (35:3-8).

Job had prayed, and cried out to God because of his afflictions; however, Elihu suggests he was not interested in drawing closer to God, but merely seeking relief from his sorrows (35:9-13).

Job had complained of not understanding the cause of his plight, and despaired of ever again enjoying God’s favor (35:14). Elihu suggested the delay in Job’s deliverance from suffering was because he had opened “his mouth in vain; He multiplieth words without knowledge” (35:15-16). Stated simply, Job had said a lot, but he had failed to humble himself before God.

Job 36 – Elihu’s Proposal to “Speak on God’s Behalf” (36:2)

Evidencing youthful pride, Elihu proposed to “speak on God’s behalf” (36:2), and to impart uncommon “knowledge” (36:3). He promised his words would be true (36:4a), and that which God Who “is perfect in knowledge” would have him to speak (36:4b).

Elihu returned to the rationale that had been espoused by Job’s friends, and that is that God is just and always rewards men according their works (36:5-15).

Elihu declared that “God is mighty…mighty in strength and wisdom” (36:5). It was Elihu’s conclusion that was untrue. He implied that God always rewards men according to their works, and declared that the Lord “preserveth [prolongs] not the life of the wicked: But giveth right [justice] to the poor” (36:6).

Elihu’s assertion failed the reality that God is “longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance” (2 Peter 3:9). Not only does the LORD prolong the life of the wicked, providing them opportunity to repent of their sins, but the poor do not always receive the justice they are due in this earthly life (36:6b).

Another error proposed by Elihu was that, hypocrites in heart heap up wrath…They die in their youth” (36:13-14a). In a perfect, sinless world that statement would stand as just, and there are many instances where wicked men die young. However, it is also true that God is patient, and his grace is offered to the worst of sinners.

Elihu suggested that Job’s sorrows were due to his pride, and had he humbled himself and repented, God would have given him a “table…full of fatness [rich foods]” (36:16). Elihu continued, because Job had refused to repent, the “judgment of the wicked” had befallen him (36:17), and no amount of riches could deliver him (36:18-19).

Job 36 concludes with Elihu attempting to inspire Job to concede the sovereignty and omnipotence of God (36:22-33).

God is supreme, and He “exalteth” and sets up whom He pleases (36:22a). He is omniscient, and no man can teach Him (36:22b). He is perfect, and cannot be accused of “iniquity” or wrong doing (36:23b).

God’s greatness is displayed in His creation (36:24-25), for the “heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth His handywork” (Psalm 19:1). He is eternal, and “the number of His years [cannot] be searched out” (36:26b).

God’s power and wisdom sustains His creation, and He determines where the clouds drop their water (36:27-28), and they act as a canopy, sheltering us from the rays and heat of the sun (36:29-30). The same clouds that brought judgment on the earth in the flood, also bear life-giving water by which He “giveth meat [food] in abundance” (36:31).

Contrary to Elihu’s reasonings, and the assertions of Job’s friends, God is not only just, He is gracious, merciful, and kind.

Matthew 5:4545That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith