PRAYER: God’s Prescription for Troubles (Psalm 143; Psalm 144)

Scripture reading – Psalm 143; Psalm 144

Our Scripture reading continues in the Book of Psalms, and the titles of both Psalm 143 and Psalm 144 credit David as the author. Psalm 144 is a psalm of worship and praise, while Psalm 143 is a penitent, mournful psalm. Today’s devotional will be taken from the latter.

We have seen a pattern and practice of prayer throughout David’s life.  When he was assailed by enemies, he prayed (Psalm 13:2; 61:3).  When trials came and troubles threatened to engulf him, he prayed (Psalm 120:1).  When he faced the scourge of the consequences of his sins, he called upon the Lord, confident He would hear, and answer his penitent prayer (Psalm 51).

Psalm 143 continues David’s practice of prayer and opens with the king calling upon the LORD for grace. He implored God, “Give ear to my supplications [plea for mercy]: In thy faithfulness answer me, and in thy righteousness [remembering God is altogether righteous, and will only do that which is right and good]” (143:1).

Notice, David did not pray for justice, but for mercy. Why? Because no man or woman can be justified in the sight of a holy, just God. David intreated the LORD, “enter not into judgment with thy servant: For in thy sight shall no man living be justified” (143:2).

David did not identify the enemy who had caused him such consternation; however, he was certainly at a low place in life. The king enumerated the wickedness of his adversary, declaring he had been “persecuted…smitten…[and made to] dwell in darkness” (143:3). David confessed he was “overwhelmed…[and his] heart…desolate” (143:4).

Where do you turn when you feel overwhelmed, and depressed?

David prayed (143:1-4), and then he remembered “the days of old” (or we might say, “the good old days,” 143:5). He remembered better days, and as he meditated on the providences of God past (His ways and works), the king’s spirit was stirred, and he literally and figuratively, reached out to God and confessed, “My soul thirsteth after thee, as a thirsty land. Selah” (143:6). The LORD wants believers to have that same passion and longing, and to realize only He can satisfy the longing of a thirsty soul.

Eight Intimate Petitions (143:7-11)

Notice the personal nature of David’s prayer to the LORD: “Hear me speedily (143:7)…Open my hearing to “thy lovingkindness” (143:8)…Reveal to me “the way wherein I should walk” (143:8)…Deliver me (143:9)…Teachme to do thy will” (143:10)…Lead me into the land of uprightness” (143:10)…”Quicken [revive] me” (143:11)…and Save me “out of trouble” (143:11). We do not know what “trouble” David was facing; however, he was in a place that only the LORD could deliver his soul from sorrows (143:11b).

Closing thoughts – Because you live in a sin-cursed world, it is inevitable that you will cross paths with an adversary; one who savors your sorrow, and is a trouble to your soul.

Where do you turn when troubles come? Many allow troubles to mount up until they resort to counselors, psychologists, prescription drugs, vices, and amusements.

What did David do? He turned to the LORD, cried for mercy (143:1-2), assessed his circumstances (143:3-4), and then he remembered. He remembered better days, and the ways and works of God (143:5). He reminded the LORD, “I am thy servant” (143:12), for he remembered the LORD is jealous for His servants’ sake (143:12).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith