“Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel” (Amos 4; Amos 5)

Scripture reading – Amos 4; Amos 5

We have seen that Amos was a shepherd (herdsman) when God called Him out of obscurity (1:1) to serve as His prophet to Israel (the northern ten tribes). Israel and Judah were enjoying a season of peace and prosperity, making Amos’ message of doom all the more unpopular with the leaders and common people of both nations.

Amos 4-6 records a series of forewarnings the prophet delivered to Israel, calling that nation to repent of its wickedness. If not, Amos warned the judgment of God was imminent.

Amos 4 – The Chastisement of Israel and a Prophecy of That Nation’s Fall

Male or Female: The Kine (Cows) of Bashan (4:1-3)

Amos 4 is rich in detail, and a point of interest that is timely for our day concerns the “kine of Bashan” (1:1). Bashan was part of the rich pasture lands located on the east side of the Jordan River. Bashan was known for its well-fed cattle, and thus the people of that region were addressed metaphorically in Amos 4:1-3 as the “kine of Bashan.”

While the word “kine” is female in gender (4:1), the pronoun “you” is masculine in the Hebrew (4:2). Thus, the warning of God’s judgment for oppressing the poor and crushing the needy was addressed to either strong females, or emasculated male leaders. Knowing homosexuality is the pinnacle of wickedness for a dying nation and people (Romans 1:26-27), I believe that sin represented a fullness of man’s departure from the Law, thereby naturally receiving God’s judgment. Amos warned the LORD had determined to send the people away (“take you away with hooks, and your posterity with fishhooks”), and no place in Samaria would be a refuge (1:3).

A Series of Judgments (4:4-11)

The LORD scorned the hypocrisy of the people who brought sacrifices to Bethel and Gilgal. They had maintained an outward form of worship, while continuing in their wickedness.

The LORD had sent a series of judgments upon the nation, but each time the people had refused to repent and return to the LORD (4:6-11). They had suffered famine (4:6), and drought (4:7-8), but would not repent. He sent plagues and mildew upon the crops, and the nation suffered plagues comparable to those experienced in Egypt, yet Israel would not turn to the LORD (4:10). Cities in Israel were destroyed by fire, reminiscent of Sodom and Gomorrah, but the people still would not turn from their sin to the LORD (4:11).

An Ominous Warning (4:12-13)

Obstinate, rebellious, and hypocritical, Amos warned the people, “Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel” (4:12). Amos urged the people to prepare to face the Creator’s judgment, warning that (4:13b) He knows every thought of man. He is everywhere, and “treadeth upon the high places of the earth” (4:13c).

Who is the LORD? He is “the God of hosts” (4:13d).

Amos 5 – A Lamentation for Israel

Though Amos was charged with the non-enviable task of warning Israel of pending judgment, he was nevertheless moved to sorrow and compassion for that rebellious people. That prophet’s lament for the “house of Israel” is recorded in Amos 5:1-3.

Amos foretold how Israel would be overthrown and suffer utter devastation. No longer pure, Amos writes, “the virgin of Israel is fallen,” and she would never rise from the ashes of her ruin (5:2a). The prophet foretold, the people would be removed from their land, and no one will come to her aid (5:2). One-tenth of the people would be all that remained in the land (5:3).

God’s Longsuffering (5:4-9)

In spite of their sins, the LORD longed to show compassion to Israel, and He invited the people, “Seek ye me, and ye shall live” (5:4). Amos admonished the people to forsake Bethel, Gilgal, and Beersheba, for those sacred places would “come to nought” (5:5). Again, Amos exhorted the people, “6Seek the Lord, and ye shall live” (5:6a).

The prophet reminded Israel how the LORD was the Creator of the constellations (5:8a). Their God was sovereign, and the sustainer of creation (causing the sun to rise dispelling the darkness, and He controls the waters of the sea, 5:8b). Amos warned, no stronghold would be safe from His judgment (5:9).

Israel’s Sins Invited God’s Judgment (5:10-15)

Israel had rejected God’s Truth, and had no tolerance for preachers of God’s Word. They “[hated] him that rebuketh in the gate, and they [abhorred] him that speaketh uprightly” (5:10). The wealthy were guilty of taxing the “poor,” and they flaunted their wealth, building great stone cut houses (5:11a). They had planted vineyards, but Amos warned they would not live to enjoy their ill-gotten gains (5:11b).

Closing thoughts – Speaking for the LORD, Amos condemned Israel for the same sins we observe in our day: The righteous were oppressed, bribes perverted justice, and judges favored the rich, and denied the poor justice, fairness and impartiality (5:12). Amos declared, the prudent would keep silent on that day of judgment (5:13). Why? Most likely because they would accept the suffering of the nation as the fate it was due, and therefore God’s plan and purpose (5:13).

With the passion of a faithful preacher, Amos called upon Israel to “seek good, and not evil, that ye may live…Hate the evil, and love the good, and establish judgment in the gate” (5:14-15).

Pronouncements of “Woe!” close the chapter (5:18-27).  The people had continued making a pretense of worship (5:21-22), but God knew their hearts (5:23), and Amos warned:

God’s judgment would soon run over the nation like flood waters.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith