Category Archives: Church

Your Invitation to Hillsdale’s Wednesday evening Bible Institute Classes

Hillsdale’s Bible Institute Classes continue this Wednesday evening with Missionary Melanie Rodgers teaching a Ladies’ class in the Friendship Hall, and Pastor Smith teaching his open attendance class in the auditorium.
Pastor Smith’s study in the Book of Proverbs will focus on Proverbs 8, part 2 of that study.
The class time is divided into three segments:
6:15-6:30pm – A time of Prayer (is not broadcast live)
6:30-7:15pm – Study in Proverbs (a live broadcast at http://www.HillsdaleBaptist.org)
7:15-7:30pm – A 15 minute live broadcast and review of this past week’s devotional study from Pastor’s “Heart of A Shepherd” series in Genesis.
With the heart of a shepherd,
Pastor Smith
Copyright 2021 – Travis D> Smith

This Sunday, 10:30 AM: Faith: “As for God, His Way is Perfect”

Thriving in the Midst of COVID-19

You are invited to join the Hillsdale Baptist Church family for public worship services, or online at http://www.HillsdaleBaptist.org, this Sunday morning, February 14, 2021.

Hillsdale’s associate pastor, Brian Barber, will be teaching the auditorium class at 9:15 AM, and Pastor Smith is preaching in the 10:30 AM worship service. I invite you to download the student lesson for today’s message that is titled, Faith: “As for God, His way is Perfect,” and is taken from the Book of Job, chapters 3-9.

Faith- As for God, His way is perfect – student blank Faith- As for God, His way is perfect – student blank

With the holidays behind us, and recent health trials passing, Hillsdale’s pastoral staff quartet is excited to be singing together once again, with this Sunday’s number titled, “Everlasting God,” arranged by Mac Lynch.

We will, by God’s Grace, do more than survive; we will thrive!

The world has offered nothing, but “bad news” this past week (and every week), so I encourage you to be in God’s Word and spend time in His presence to combat the negative influence.  Try to block out the noise of the world, and perhaps the noise within your soul. Focusing on God’s Word will bring the needed “good news” that is so important!

I am not a plodder by nature, and that means I struggle when God providentially says (through His Word or circumstances), “Slow Down; Stop; Meditate on this!” I had planned to take no more than two weeks to study the life of Job (and we will study at a rapid pace); however, as I reviewed and pondered spiritual principles from his trials, I realized how much we all need to be encouraged to keep our focus on the LORD. I pray our study in the Book of Job will bless you as much as it has me!

Two Evangelists and Two Powerful Sundays

Providentially, God has brought to our ministry three beloved evangelists in the first two months of 2021. Evangelist Tom Farrell was mightily used by God to stir our hearts in January. February 21 and 24, we are blessed to have Evangelist Ron DeGarde, his family, and team with us for Sunday’s 9:15 AM and 10:30 AM services, and Wednesday evening, 6:30 PM. An unexpected joy is the opportunity of having you meet Evangelist Bill Rice III, Sunday morning, February 28, 2021.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Travis D. Smith

Senior Pastor
www.HeartofAShepherd.com
https://mewe.com/p/heartofashepherdinc

“Here Comes the Bride” (Genesis 24)

Scripture reading – Genesis 24

Faithful to His promises, God had blessed Sarah in her old age, and as a 90-year-old wife, she had given Abraham a son when he was 100-years-old. She died when she was “an hundred and seven and twenty years old” (Genesis 23:1), meant that Isaac was 37-years-old at the time of his mother’s death.

Genesis 24:1-9 – An Urgency to Find a Suitable Wife for Isaac

We read, “Abraham was old, and well stricken in age: and the Lord had blessed Abraham in all things” (24:1). The three years that had passed since Sarah’s death (25:20), had impressed Abraham with an urgency to prepare his son to become not only the master of the household, but also the heir of God’s covenant with Abraham’s lineage. An essential part of that preparation was the choosing of a wife for Isaac.

Burdened that Isaac would have a fitting wife, Abraham summoned his eldest servant (24:2), and charged him that Isaac “shalt not take a wife unto my son of the daughters of the Canaanites [a heathen, idolatrous people], among whom I dwell: 4But thou shalt go unto my country [the country out of which God had called him, Genesis 12:1-3], and to my kindred, and take a wife unto my son Isaac” (24:3-4).

The servant questioned Abraham concerning the considerations for choosing Isaac’s wife, and was admonished that, should a young woman be unwilling to return with him to Canaan (24:5), he must not permit Isaac to leave the land God had given him as an inheritance (24:6-9).

Genesis 24:10-67 – The Search for Isaac’s Wife

A caravan of ten camels, servants, and supplies accompanied Abraham’s trusted servant for the 500-mile journey across the desert, from Canaan to the city of Nahor in Mesopotamia (24:10).

Arriving at the well in Nahor in the evening, the servant was aware the young women of the households would come to the well for water, and there he compelled the camels to kneel (24:11-13). Abraham’s servant made a passionate plea to the LORD to guide him (24:11-14), and “before he had done speaking…Rebekah came out, who was born to Bethuel, son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother, with her pitcher upon her shoulder” (24:14).

Rebekah was God’s answer to the servant’s prayer, for she was “very fair to look upon, a virgin, neither had any man known her: and she went down to the well, and filled her pitcher, and came up” (24:16). Beautiful, chaste (24:16), considerate (24:18), diligent in serving (24:19-20), and of a household that called on Jehovah (24:31a), the servant broke out into a prayer of praise and thanksgiving, testifying, “I being in the way, the LORD led me to the house of my master’s brethren” (24:27).

Rewarding Rebekah with “a golden earring of half a shekel weight, and two bracelets for her hands of ten shekels weight of gold” (24:22), she invited Abraham’s servant to her family’s household where he would meet Laban, Rebekah’s brother (24:23-29).

The servant refused to be comforted by food or shelter until he had stated his mission, and given testimony of God’s providences in leading him to their home (24:30-50). Declaring, “I am Abraham’s servant” (24:34), he shared how God had blessed his master with great wealth (24:35), and a son who would be his heir (24:36).

Hearing how God had providentially led the servant to Rebekah, her brother and father gave their blessing for her to become Isaac’s wife (24:50-56). When Rebekah was requested to give her consent to depart with Abraham’s servant, and to be the wife of Isaac, she consented saying, “I will go” (24:58). With the blessing of her family (24:59-60), Rebekah departed with her attendant, and journeyed with the Abraham’s servant to Canaan (24:61).

As they entered the land Abraham and Isaac called home, they spotted Isaac coming toward them (24:62-63), and Rebekah covered herself with a veil, expressing both modesty and humility (24:64).

Isaac listened to the servant’s report, and how the LORD had led him to Rebekah (24:66), and “Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah’s tent… and she became his wife; and he loved her” (24:67).

Though their marriage was not always a picture of peace and happiness, the union of Isaac and Rebekah has served as an enduring testimony of God’s personal interest in our lives, and His providential leading in our marriages, and families.

Oh that we all might choose to walk in righteousness, be able to say with Abraham’s servant, “I being in the way, the LORD led me” (24:27). 

Do Right, and you will not only do the will of the LORD, you will be confident in it!

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

You are invited to join Hillsdale Baptist Church for our worship service, this Sunday, 10:30 AM.

A Note of Praise and Thanksgiving

After a month in exile, it is my joy to be back in the pulpit this Sunday morning (10:30 AM)!

I had no way of knowing when I departed to visit loved ones after Christmas, that Sheilah and I were beginning a monthlong journey of trouble. COVID-19 laid us both aside in early January, and Sheilah’s bout turned into pneumonia and a 5-day hospital stay.

We are weary physically; however, we have learned much about our frailties, and the LORD these past weeks

If you have followed my daily devotionals, you are aware that the majority of the month of January was devoted to a study of the Book of Job. In fact, my devotional commentary on Job was written and posted while Sheilah and I were afflicted with the Coronavirus.

This Sunday morning, I am going to share some spiritual truths from my study in the Book of Job, and invite our church family to consider some inspiring spiritual truths taken from the life of a man of God who suffered the catastrophic loss of everything.01 – COVID, and My Life with Job – February 7, 2021 student lesson

The title of this morning’s sermon is: “COVID-19, and My Life with Job, the Patriarch”
Our passage will be Job, chapters 1-2.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith
www.HillsdaleBaptist.org
https://mewe.com/p/heartofashepherdinc

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

COVID-19, and My Life with Job, the Patriarch

Dear Hillsdale and Heart of a Shepherd Readers,

Some of you are aware that my wife and I faced our bout with COVID-19 in January 2021, and have been away for a month. We left for vacation on the New Year; however, our lives took on a trial that mirrored this year’s Bible reading schedule. https://youtu.be/jijCsCWOpsU

On January 1, 2021, I began a new two-year chronological study of the Scriptures in my daily devotional commentary series that I post on www.HeartofAShepherd.com. After completing a brief study of Genesis 1-11, the new reading schedule took me to the Book of Job, and a 42-chapter study of that man of God and his afflictions.

I did not know that the study of Job’s life would coincide with mine, and my wife’s affliction with COVID-19. I soon found myself living the reality of a frightening turn of events. While my battle with COVID was only five days with a high fever, and fatigue; my beautiful wife’s battle became a two-week long struggle that eventually put her in the hospital with bilateral pneumonia.

I praise the LORD that He spared us both from tragedy, and Sheilah was able to come home from the hospital. We returned to Tampa on Monday, February 1, and we are slowly getting back into our daily schedule.

To our church family and others who were aware of our trials, and prayed, thank you. We are grateful for your care, and concern for us. My wife was especially encouraged by the flowers, cards, and texts that were sent at a time she could not respond.

I invite you to join me this Sunday for public worship (10:30 AM) or by the internet at www.HillsdaleBaptist.org. I am prayerfully preparing a message for this Sunday that I may title, “COVID-19, and My Life with Job, the Patriarch.” Though ill, and very concerned for my wife, my study in the Book of Job was timely as I identified with him, and was reminded of God’s providences and loving care of His people.

In the words of Job, 5I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear: But now mine eye seeth thee” (Job 42:5)

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith
www.HeartofAShepherd.com
www.HillsdaleBaptist.org

Did You Know, Men of Ancient Times Knew the Earth Was Suspended in Space? (Job 25-26)

Scripture reading – Job 25-26

Job 25 – Bildad’s Final Reply

Bildad the Shuhite, the last of Job’s friends to speak, offered his final reply to Job in Job 25. Only six verses long, and unlike the vein of his earlier judgments, the focus of Bildad’s comments was upon God’s character. Remember, the opinion of his friends was that Job’s troubles suggested some great unconfessed sin for which God was punishing him.

Bildad’s final speech declared lofty truths regarding God, identifying Him as the Sovereign of His creation (25:2a), whose reign brings peace (25:2b). The heavenly armies of the Lord are innumerable, and the bright light of His person never sets upon His creation (25:3). The righteousness of God is brighter than the moon, and of purer light than the stars of heaven (25:5).

Man, however, cannot be justified (declared righteous) in the sight of God, for he is “born of a woman” (25:4). All men are sinners by nature, and “there [are] none righteous” (Romans 3:10); “for all have sinned and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23).

What is man? In contrast to God who is altogether holy, man is “a worm…and the son of man, which is a worm” (25:6). The word “worm” is a maggot; a disgusting worm that feeds upon dead flesh. In other words, man is so depraved, so inferior to God, that we are as maggots.

“How then can man be justified with God?” asked Bildad.

If sinful man is hopelessly depraved, and cannot find peace with God, what is a sinner to do? Paul answered man’s dilemma when he declared, “being justified [declared righteous and acceptable] by faith [in God’s offer of salvation and forgiveness], we have peace with God through [by] our Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 5:1).

Job 26 – The Majesty of Our Creator

Job 26 commences Job’s longest, and last speech (Job 26-31:40). He denounced Bildad for his miserable failure. Instead of comfort, he had brought condemnation (26:2). Rather than sensible counsel, he had taught error, and brought sorrow (26:3-4).

Having listened to his friends claims of wisdom, Job revealed to them a knowledge of God that is astounding, even to 21st century humanity. Recollecting that the Book of Job is believed to be the oldest book in the Scriptures, we find truths in Job 26:7-9 that are a marvel to consider, and were only in the past millennium accepted by scientists.

Job 26:7 7He [God] stretcheth out the north over the empty place, And hangeth the earth upon nothing.

Did you know that above the north pole, astronomers have found a space in which there are no visible stars [1]; in other words, there is an “empty place?” (26:7a) Job also revealed that God created, and He “hangeth the earth upon nothing” (26:7b).

Ancient men believed that the earth was held up, or was sitting upon something. Hindu worshippers believed the earth was resting on the back of an elephant, which was standing on a tortoise. [2] The Greeks believed the god they identified as Atlas was holding the world on his shoulders. God, however, had revealed to Job that the earth was suspended in space, and hanging on nothing!

Job 26:8 8He [God] bindeth up [wraps up; locks up] the waters in his thick clouds; And the cloud is not rent [breached; torn] under them.

Job knew that God had locked up tons of water in the fluffy, beautiful clouds that we see suspended in the sky. Though bearing tons of water, the clouds are “not rent,” until God has determined where and when rain will fall upon the earth. [3] So much more might be said, but I will conclude with Job’s closing observation in Job 26.

Job 26:14 14Lo, these are parts [limits; vastness] of his [God’s] ways: But how little a portion [only a whisper] is heard of him? But the thunder [roar] of his power who can understand [grasp; make sense of]?

Our Creator is so great, that no man can define Him with words. Let the heavens declare His majesty (Psalm 19:1; 97:6), and allow the image of His Son dying on the Cross remind us how much He loved the world (John 3:16; Romans 5:8).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

[1] Butler, J. G. (2008). Job: The Suffering Saint (Vol. Number Twenty-Four, p. 347). Clinton, IA: LBC Publications.
[2] Exell, J. S. (n.d.). The Biblical Illustrator: Job (p. 451). New York; Chicago; Toronto; London; Edinburgh: Fleming H. Revell Company.
[3] Exell, J. S. (n.d.). The Biblical Illustrator: Job (p. 453). New York; Chicago; Toronto; London; Edinburgh: Fleming H. Revell Company.

The Tragic Consequences of Generational Sins (Job 20-21)

Scripture reading – Job 20-21

Job 20 records the second and final response of Zophar the Naamathite (his first speech was recorded in Job 11). Offended by Job’s admonition that his “friends” would face God’s wrath for their harsh judgments (19:28-29), Zophar’s rebuke came swift and furious (20:1-3).

Job 20:4-29 – The Fate of the Wicked

Like his friends, Zophar inferred that Job’s afflictions were to be expected by those who are wicked. Consider three erroneous opinions Zophar stated regarding his observations of the wicked.

The first error, that the wicked always come to destruction (20:4-11).

Zophar submitted that the rejoicing of the wicked is brief (20:4), and the honors bestowed on them perishes with them, and they are soon forgotten (20:5-8). Neither of those statements is necessarily true. In fact, the wicked often live out their lives enjoying ill acquired wealth, and their funerals and tombs are often grand spectacles to behold.

The second error, that the wicked will not prosper (20:12-23).

Continuing his erroneous observations, Zophar suggested that the prosperity of the wicked is brief (20:12), inevitably bites like a poisonous viper (20:13-16), and he dies in want.

One need remembers the LORD’s parable of a rich fool (Luke 12:16-21) to understand the error in Zophar’s reasoning. Beguiled with the pleasures of his riches, the rich man ordered his barns be torn down to build greater barns, and said to his soul, “Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry” (Luke 12:19). Rather than die in want, the rich fool died as he had lived, enjoying his wealth until he learned in eternity that he was the poorest of men: “20But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided? 21So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God” (Luke 12:20–21).

The third error in Zophar’s observations was that only the wicked suffer devastating sorrows, and catastrophic losses (20:24-29).

Zophar maintained that the wicked are struck down (20:24-25), and all that he has is destroyed (20:26).  He observed that the wicked feel everything is against him, until his riches are consumed by God’s wrath (20:27-28).

While it might be argued that the wicked often suffer loss, it is more often true that they are rewarded by the system of this fallen world, and hailed for their ill-gotten gains (John 15:19a).

The implication of Zophar’s argument was that Job’s sorrows were a wicked man’s afflictions, and such is the lot or “heritage,” God has “appointed” for the wicked (20:29).

Job 21 – Rather than Suffer, the Wicked Prosper

I will summarize Job 21 by outlining Job’s disagreement with Zophar’s fallacies. Demanding his friends be silent that he might speak, Job sarcastically challenged them that after he had spoken, “mock on” (21:1-2).

Confessing his struggle was with God, not with men (21:3-6), Job observed that the wicked and their children often live long lives, and enjoy prosperity (21:7-13). He contended that the riches of the wicked cause their hearts to be calloused, and “they say unto God, Depart from us; For we desire not the knowledge of thy ways. 15What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? And what profit should we have, if we pray unto him?” (21:14-15)

Failing to realize that they deserve nothing, and all that they have is a testimony of God’s grace and longsuffering, the prosperity of the wicked moves them to reject God (21:16).

Do not assume that the wicked go unpunished.

The consequences of sin are inevitable, and the wicked are “18 as stubble before the wind, And as chaff that the storm carrieth away. 19God layeth up his [the wicked’s] iniquity for his children: He rewardeth him, and he shall know it” (21:18-19).

Here is a tragic truth: The children of the wicked often suffer the influence of their parent’s sins. That truth is stated three times in the Law (Exodus 20:5; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9).

Numbers 14:18 – “18The Lord is longsuffering, and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation.”

Warning: The consequences of your sins may be borne by your children.

A Personal Note: Knowing this devotional series is read daily by hundreds of believers, I covet your prayers for my wife. She was hospitalized today, January 19, 2021, with pneumonia and we are waiting on confirmation if her illness is COVID-19 related. As you might imagine, the devotions in the Book of Job have been personal, and have coincided with my wife and me facing our own afflictions. Thank you for interceding for us. I will update this prayer request when I receive news.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

When Trials Come, and Sorrows Overwhelm (Job 3)

Scripture reading – Job 3 

Continuing our study of Job, we have noted that this suffering saint, though having lost everything, had in the words of his wife, “retained [his] integrity,” (2:9a). Frustrated by his humility before God, Job’s wife urged him to “curse God, and die” (2:9).

Job, however, reproved his wife for speaking the way of “foolish women,” and reasoned, “What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?” In spite of his trials, and overwhelming sorrows, Job never sinned by complaining against his God (2:10).

Job 2 concludes with the arrival of his “three friends” (2:11), who having heard of his trials, came purposing “to mourn with him and to comfort him” (2:11b). Arriving together, they were shocked when they beheld the physical toll of Job’s trials (2:12a). In an outward expression of their compassion and sorrow, “they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven” (2:12b). For “seven days and seven nights,” they sat on the ground with Job, never speaking a word, “for they saw that his grief was very great” (2:13).

Job 3 – The Silence is Broken

Seven days having passed, the silence was finally broken when Job began to speak. Contrary to Satan’s slander, that he would curse his Creator in the midst of his sorrows (1:11; 2:5), Job lamented that his suffering was so great it would be better had he never been born (3:1).

The balance of Job 3 records the anxiety of this man whose faith had not wavered, but whose mind and soul were weighted by an avalanche of trouble. Finding no solace, Job finally gave expression to his anguish, acknowledging his deepest, inmost doubts for his very existence (3:2-12). He bewailed the day he was conceived (3:2-12), and began to look upon death as a welcome release from his sufferings, and the great equalizer that all men must eventually face (3:12-19). Mourning his misery (3:20-23), Job questioned why God gives “light” (i.e. life) to a soul that longs to be free from sorrows (3:20-26).

But, lest we be too hard on Job, let us remember that his words serve as a reminder that even good men struggle deep within their soul. Though overwhelmed with misery, Job was no less the man in whom God had boasted, “there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil” (2:3).

Any who have suffered deeply can relate to the hopelessness that grasped Job’s heart. Pain, especially when it affects family and loved ones, can drive anyone to entertain dark or despairing thoughts.

Job did not know the calamities he had suffered were a matter in which heaven itself had an acute interest. Nor was God with him less in his sorrows, than He had been in his prosperity. I close reminding you of a spiritual principle that should lift your heart when you feel trials are overwhelming you:

1 Corinthians 10:1313 There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God isfaithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

God Remembered Noah (Genesis 7-8)

Scripture reading – Genesis 7-8

Genesis 6 ended with God commanding Noah to build the Ark, while Genesis 7 begins with Noah being commanded to enter the Ark, leaving us a gap of 120 years between the two chapters. What occupied Noah’s time during those years?

God had revealed to Noah his plan to destroy the earth, and commanded him to build an Ark, giving him the design of that great ship of salvation (6:14-17). Lest there be any doubt of the extent of His judgment, God made Noah to understand that the flood would be universal, destroying “all flesh, wherein is the breath of life, from under heaven; and every thing that is in the earth shall die” (6:17).

Now God established a covenant with Noah (6:18), and his family would be saved from the flood waters being spared from God’s judgment; not because they were sinless, but because he was the object of God’s grace (6:8). Knowing He intended to restore the earth after the flood waters receded, God directed Noah to prepare to bring two “of every living thing…into the ark, to keep them alive with thee; they shall be male and female” (6:19-20), and to store “food that is eaten… food for thee, and for them” (6:21).

Genesis 6 concluded with Noah doing “according to all that God commanded him” (6:22). Here was a man of faith; a man who had not experienced a rainfall (for the waters were still in the firmament encircling the earth, 1:7), now building a massive ship, and preaching an imminent judgment (2 Peter 2:5).

Genesis 7 – “All Aboard!”

The day came when the preacher’s sermons fell silent, and the work on the Ark was complete; “And the Lordsaid unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation” (7:1).

In addition to the male and female of each “kind” and “every sort” being saved from the flood waters (6:19-20), we read that Noah was commanded to lead into the Ark seven “of every clean beast” (7:2-3), which we know he will later sacrifice in an act of worship and thanksgiving when the flood waters recede (8:20). Noah was 600 years old “when the flood of waters” began, and he “did according unto all that the LORD commanded him” (7:5-6, 16). With Noah, his family, and all the animals safe in the Ark, “the LORD shut [Noah] in” (7:16), and the waters that had been preserved in the earth since creation were “broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened. And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights” (7:11-12).

All was destroyed, and all “flesh died that moved upon the earth…and every man” (7:21), and “Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark” (7:23).

Genesis 8 – God Remembered Noah

After a year of devastating storms and floodwaters, and after a year of confinement in the Ark, the Scriptures simply state, “God remembered Noah” (8:1).

In the midst of His wrath, and the greatest cataclysmic event to ever come upon the earth, God remembered one man and his family. The world Noah had known was destroyed, and every man, woman, boy, and girl were perished in the waters. Three hundred and seventy days after the rains began, Noah was commanded, “16 Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons’ wives with thee” (8:16).

Closing thoughts: Noah’s first act after disembarking from the Ark was to build an altar and offer sacrifices to God (8:20-21a). The LORD’s first act was to accept Noah’s sacrifice, and make a covenant with the man and his family (8:21b-22). Noah’s sacrifice acknowledged his sin, and need of a substitute, while God’s covenant served as His promise to extend His mercy, and promise to never again destroy the earth with floodwaters (8:21-22).

With the Ark resting on the slope of Mount Aarat as our backdrop, I close inviting you to picture in your thoughts, Noah and his family, prostrate on their faces before an altar. As the smoke of their offerings ascend to heaven, Noah looks across a valley and sees a beautiful rainbow (9:12-17), its arch appearing to reach toward the very throne of God.

By faith, Noah had entered through the door of the Ark, and God had shut the door, saving Noah and his family. So it is by faith that sinners enter another door, and are saved from the penalty of sins and eternal hell. That door is Jesus Christ who promised, “I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved” (John 10:7, 11).

Is He your Savior?

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

A Tale of Two Lineages (Genesis 5-6)

Scripture reading – Genesis 5-6

Genesis 4 concluded with Cain being driven from the presence of Adam’s household (4:12-16),and him taking a wife, and establishing an ungodly lineage (4:17) that would be the curse of righteous men (4:18-24).

Several sons and daughters were born of Adam and Eve’s union (5:4); however, it was a son whom Eve named Seth that God chose as His godly lineage (4:25). Seth had a son whom he named Enos, and then we read, “then began men to call upon the name of the LORD” (4:26).

Genesis 5 – A Tale of Two Lineages

Before we identify the two lineages that proceeded from Adam and Eve, consider for a moment the incredibly long life spans of the men of these first generations. For instance, Adam lived 930 years (5:4); his son Seth lived 912 years (5:8); and Enos lived 905 years (5:11). How might we explain the longevity of early human life?

Various scholars have tackled that question, and many have scoffed at the possibility of men living nine hundred years or more. Although not original with me (and I do not know whom to cite as my source), there are generally two explanations: That earth’s atmosphere was an expanse of water “above the firmament” (1:7) and therefore shielded man and the world from harmful environmental factors that hasten aging (an example would be the cosmic rays of the sun). A second explanation for longevity, and one I believe is most important, is that the human race was more genetically pure, and there was less disease and sickness. By the way, the longevity of man in those early centuries would have contributed to a boom in population growth that some have estimated might have reached billions of souls before the Flood!

The ungodly lineage of Cain was recorded in Genesis 4:16-24, but remember only a few of his descendants are named, and only because of their important role in the Biblical narrative. I hope to address Cain’s lineage at a later time.

The godly lineage of Adam, through his son Seth is given in Genesis 5 and takes us through to the birth of Noah, and his three sons, “Shem, Ham, and Japheth” (5:32).

Genesis 6 – Judgment and Destruction: The Worldwide Flood

Like our day, the world of Noah’s day before the Flood evidenced not only a population explosion, but also a wickedness that motivated God to intervene, allowing the Flood to cleanse the earth, in preparation for His promise of a Redeemer to be fulfilled. Once again, we are made privy to the thoughts and heart of God.  Seeing the proliferation of sin in the world, the LORD avowed, “My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years” (6:3).

The heart of man had become so consumed with wickedness, that even the godly lineage (“the sons of God”), intermingled with the “daughters of men” (6:4, I believe a reference to the line of Cain). God determined, “every imagination of the thoughts of [man’s] heart was only evil continually” (6:5). Grieved by the wickedness of man, the LORD declared, “I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them” (6:7).

I close inviting you to consider an incredible phrase, and a wonderful doctrine:

But Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord” (6:8). The statement concerning Noah’s spiritual relationship continues: “Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God” (6:9).

Genesis 6:8 is the first mention of God’s “grace” in the Scriptures (although amazing grace was evident when the LORD sacrificed to cover Adam and Eve’s nakedness with skins).

How did Noah respond to God’s gracious commandment to build an ark to the saving of his house, and thereby establishing His covenant (6:18)? He responded in the same way that all sinners must to be saved…Faith. Noah believed God!

Hebrews 11:7 – “By faith Noah, being warned of God of things [and events] not seen as yet, moved with fear [took heed of God’s warning and used due diligence], prepared an ark to the saving [deliverance] of his house; by the which [FAITH] he condemned the world [of unbelief], and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith.”

Noah’s faith in God was expressed in his obedience: “Thus did Noah; according to all that God had commanded him, so did he” (6:22).

What of your faith? What do your works say about your faith, and trust in God? After all, “faith without works is dead” (James 2:20).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith