Category Archives: Death

Belshazzar’s Final Feast: The Party is Over (Daniel 5; Daniel 6)

Scripture reading – Daniel 5; Daniel 6

Our Scripture reading is Daniel 5 and 6, but the focus of today’s devotional will be solely Daniel 5.

I have made the observation how the History of the Nations is “His-Story,” the Story of God’s Sovereignty. The rise of nations, and their precipitous fall serve as a testimony of God’s hand. The ruins of failed nations dot the landscape of the world, and are buried under desert sands, or discovered under the relics of past civilizations. Though leaders of nations boast in their might, they would do well to remember, “Our God is in the heavens: He hath done whatsoever He hath pleased” (Psalm 115:3).

Daniel 5 – The Fall of Babylon

Babylon’s rise from a city-state to a world empire comes to a sudden, and decisive end in Daniel 5. The Chaldean kingdom barely spanned a century. Her rise to power under Nebuchadnezzar, and sudden fall under Belshazzar fulfilled God’s prophecies of judgment against Israel and her restoration to the land after 70 years (Isaiah 13:17-22; 21:1-10; 47:1-5; Jeremiah 51:33-58).

The Actions of a Foolish King (5:1-12)

The Scriptures introduce us to Belshazzar without an introduction, whom we believe was the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar (5:1). Though he knew the astonishing history of his grandfather and the humiliation he suffered when he scorned the LORD (5:21-22), the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar was a fool and dared to blaspheme the God of heaven. Hosting a banquet for a thousand nobles, the drunken king commanded the gold and silver vessels from the LORD’s Temple be brought to his tables. The king and his guests drank from the sacred vessels (5:2-3) and scorned the Creator of the Universe, toasting their “gods of gold, and of silver, of brass, of iron, of wood, and of stone” (5:4).

Suddenly, the king spied the “fingers of a man’s hand writing on the plaster of the wall, over by a candlestick” (5:5). Illuminated by the glow of the light, and the sight of a man’s fingers etching words into the plaster of the wall, the king was terrified and visibly shaken (5:6). The demeanor of the king silenced the banquet, as the king summoned the wise men of his realm to come, read, and interpret the words on the wall (5:7). The king offered the reward of a scarlet robe, a golden chain (probably a symbol of authority), and the role of “the third ruler in the kingdom” (his father is believed to have been his co-ruler, 5:7). Yet, none of the wise men could read, or tell the meaning of the words on the wall (5:8).

Though not a part of the drunken revelry, the queen mother of the realm (most likely the wife of the late king Nebuchadnezzar), received news the banquet was interrupted, and came to the hall to see her grandson (5:10). Offering comfort and counsel (5:10-11), the queen reminded Belshazzar there was yet a man of the Hebrews who served Nebuchadnezzar, and had the reputation of being a man of wisdom (5:11). The queen counseled her grandson to summon Daniel, for he had the reputation of being a man with “an excellent spirit, and knowledge, and understanding, interpreting of dreams” (5:12).

The Appeal of a Foolish King (5:13-17)

Belshazzar summoned Daniel, who was now an elderly man, and inquired if he had served Nebuchadnezzar as counselor (5:13-14). Relating to Daniel his own wise men failed him (5:15), the king appealed to the aged prophet to read the writing on the wall, and promised to reward him with a scarlet robe, a gold chain, and promote him to “the third ruler in the kingdom” (5:16). Indifferent to the promise of reward and promotion (for a man of God will not be bought or bribed), Daniel rejected the king’s proposal (5:16-17a). He did, however, assure the king he would read “and make known to him the interpretation” (5:17).

Daniel’s Analysis of the Inscription (5:18-23)

Before he interpreted the words on the wall, Daniel reminded Belshazzar his grandfather had been a great and powerful king, “but when his heart was lifted up, and his mind hardened in pride, he [had been] deposed from his kingly throne, and they took his glory from him” (5:20; 4:23). The humiliation of Nebuchadnezzar lasted seven years, until he humbled himself and acknowledged “the most high God ruled in the kingdom of men, and that he appointeth over it whomsoever he will” (5:21).

Daniel then rebuked the king, and said, “thou his son [grandson], O Belshazzar, hast not humbled thine heart, though thou knewest all this” (5:22). The king had mocked “the Lord of heaven” and taken the vessels that were for His Temple, and blasphemed God (5:23). He had praised idols “of silver, and gold, of brass, iron, wood, and stone” (5:23), though they cannot see, “nor hear, nor know” (5:23). Even though the God of heaven holds man’s breath in His hand, Belshazzar had “not glorified” Him (5:23).

Numbered, Numbered, Wanting, and Broken (5:25-28)

Fulfilling his obligation as prophet, and the king’s messenger, Daniel boldly declared and interpreted the writing on the wall: “MENE, MENE, TEKEL, UPHARSIN” (5:25).

Unlike Nebuchadnezzar, whom God gave opportunity to humble himself and repent, there would be no mercy for Belshazzar and his kingdom. He would not escape the judgment of God for his days were numbered and fulfilled; he had been weighed in God’s just scales; and the kingdom would be divided, “and given to the Medes and Persians” (5:27-28).

Closing thoughts (5:29-31) – There was no escape for Belshazzar, for he was guilty: Guilty of pride, Guilty of defying, blaspheming, and profaning God’s name; Guilty of idolatry, and Guilty of failing to honor and acknowledge God as Sovereign.

The foolish king’s final act was to honor the servant of God proclaiming him a ruler of a kingdom that was doomed. He dressed Daniel in a robe of purple, and hanging about his neck a chain of gold, yet, all was for naught (5:29). By diverting the waters of the Euphrates River, the Medes and Persians were already pouring into the city, and that night Babylon would fall and “Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans [was] slain” (5:30).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

A Crisis of Faith and Integrity (Daniel 3; Daniel 4)

Scripture reading – Daniel 3; Daniel 4

Scholars suggest a 20-year gap exists between Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of a great image (Daniel 2), and his elevation of one “in the plain of Dura,” outside the massive walls of the city of Babylon (Daniel 3:1). Assuming the passing of two decades, Daniel and his three Hebrew companions were then in their mid-30’s, in the prime of manhood, and serving as administrators in Nebuchadnezzar’s government (2:48-49). Today’s devotional will be focused on Daniel 3, though our Scripture reading includes Daniel 4.

The King’s Idol (3:1-3)

In spite of him confessing Daniel’s God was “the God of gods, the Lord of kings” (2:47), the king had gone his own way, and returned to his idolatry, worshipping and offering sacrifices to idols. Yet, the king remembered the image of his dreams, and Daniel’s interpretation that the golden head of the image represented his realm as king (2:38). The proud king, not content with an image bearing only a head of gold, determined to raise an entire image of gold. Standing an impressive 90 feet tall and 9 feet wide, the golden image towered above men. Understanding the diversity of nations under his rule, Nebuchadnezzar expected all men to worship his idol (3:2-3).

A Crisis of Integrity (3:4-18)

With a day of dedication determined, a herald called “all people, nations, and languages” (3:4) to bow and worship Nebuchadnezzar’s golden image (3:4-5). With the warning, Bow or Burn, all men and women were expected to give homage to “the golden image” (3:7).  A sea of humanity gathered before the great image, and when the music was heard, all bowed before the image, with the exception of three men. The assimilation of the children of Israel into Babylonian culture had been universal, with the exception of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego (Daniel’s absence was perhaps due to his travels on behalf of the king).

There were some Chaldeans who used the occasion to accuse the three Hebrew men, that prompted an inquisition before the king (3:13-15). Although angered by their refusal, and perhaps out of respect for Daniel, Nebuchadnezzar gave Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego a second opportunity to bow before his idol, but also repeated the consequences should they refuse (3:15).

Though far from their home and the godly influences of their youth, the three men proved steadfast in their convictions (Exodus 20:3-5), and recognized two outcomes for their fidelity:  “Our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of thine hand, O king. 8But if not, be it known unto thee, O king, that we will not serve thy gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up“ (3:17-18).

The Fire of the King’s Indignation (3:19-26)

Overcome with “rage and fury” (3:13, 19), Nebuchadnezzar ordered the furnace heated 7 times hotter than normal. The king then commanded his “most mighty men” (perhaps his own guard) to bind and cast Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego into the furnace (3:19-21). The fire of the furnace instantly killed the mighty men when they cast the men into the furnace (3:21-23). Sitting down to observe, the king was suddenly shaken by the sight of not three, but four men walking about in the furnace, and unscathed by its heat and flames (3: 24). Nebuchadnezzar likened the fourth to a heavenly figure, and said he was “like the Son of God” (3:26).

A Divine Intervention (3:26-27)

Humbled by the miraculous preservation of the three men, and the sight of the divine image of the fourth, the king summoned Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego by name, calling them the “servants of the most high God” (3:26). The men emerged from the furnace (3:26), as their accusers gathered and were amazed “the fire had no power, nor was an hair of their head singed, neither were their coats changed, nor the smell of fire had passed on them” (3:27).

The King’s Invocation (3:28-30)

Realizing only the ropes that bound them was singed by the flames (3:27), Nebuchadnezzar confessed “the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego” had sent His angel to save them (3:28). The king confessed the LORD had overruled his edict, and spared their lives “that they might not serve nor worship any god, except their own God” (3:28).

Closing thoughts (3:29-30) – Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego’s conviction to worship no other God, inspired the king to dare any of his kingdom to speak ill of their God, and to declare “there is no other God that can deliver after this sort” (3:29). The men were not only preserved from death, but were promoted by the king (3:30).

Believer, you might not face a fiery furnace, but you will certainly face fiery troubles and trials. I urge you to follow Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego’s example. Before they faced the temptation to bow to the golden image, we can be sure they had determined in their hearts they would trust the God of heaven and only worship and serve Him.

Romans 8:35–3935Who shall separate [come between] us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation [trouble], or distress [hardships; anguish], or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?… 38For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life…nor things present, nor things to come…shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

The Judgment of the Nations (Joel 3)

Scripture reading – Joel 3

Today’s Scripture reading marks the end of the Book of Joel (only three chapters long), and an introduction to the prophetic Book of Daniel. This devotional will conclude our study of Joel. A second devotional will follow, and serve as the introduction to the Book of Daniel.

I believe this final section of our study actually began with the closing verses of Joel 2. In its immediate context, the prophecies of Joel were given as the Assyrian army laid siege to Jerusalem. The prophet Isaiah recorded how the LORD intervened for the city, and sent His angel who smote 185,000 soldiers (Isaiah 37:36). King Sennacherib had been forced to retreat to his homeland, where he was later assassinated by his sons (Isaiah 37:33-38).

The Day of the LORD is the prophetic day of God’s judgment, when He will take vengeance on those nations that abused Israel and Judah. With the assurance of His perpetual presence “in the midst,” Israel would know Him as “the LORD your God,” and the day would come when Israel would “never be ashamed” (2:27).

In my opinion, the “last days” began with Christ’s earthly ministry, and the prophecy of the outpouring of His Spirit was fulfilled on the Day of Pentecost (2:28-30; Acts 2:16-20). Nevertheless, the events recorded in the closing verses of Joel 2 and Joel 3, will not be fulfilled until the close of the Tribulation, and will mark the beginning of the Millennial Kingdom.

Joel 3 – The Judgment of the Gentile Nations

A Day of Reckoning for the Nations (3:1-2)

Joel 3:1 was partly fulfilled when the LORD moved on the heart of Cyrus, king of Persia, to grant the Jews liberty to return to their homeland where they would rebuild the Temple (Ezra 1:1-3). Yet, the final fulfillment of Joel 3 will not come to pass until the close of the Tribulation. The LORD promised He will one day gather His people from the nations (3:1), and exercise judgment on the Gentile nations for their sins against Him and His people (3:2).

Enumeration of the Sins of the Gentiles (3:3-6)

The nations of the earth have forever been at war with God and His people, yet, the sins of some nation have been so egregious, they are specifically named for judgment: Tyre, Zidon, the nations of Palestine (3:4), Egypt, and Sodom (3:19).

The sins committed against God’s people are an offense to God, and He judged the Gentile nations guilty. Tyre, Zidon, the nations of Palestine, Egypt, and Sodom had scattered His chosen people with their persecutions, and parted the land He gave as an inheritance to Israel (3:2c). Those nations had enslaved the Jews (3:3a, 6), trafficked boys and girls as sexual slaves, and placed no more value on their lives than wine (3:3). Spoiling the gold and silver of the land, they had taken away that which was the LORD’s (3:4-6).

Justice and Judgment (3:4, 7-8)

The sins of the Gentile nations will be punished, and they will receive the recompence (be repaid) in kind for the sins they committed against the LORD and His people (3:4). The LORD determined to gather His people and restore them to their land (3:7), and the nations that enslaved them would themselves become slaves (3:8a). Their sons and daughters will be sold “to the Sabeans” (a caravan people of the southern Arabian Peninsula), and trafficked to far away lands (3:8b).

Warfare of the Nations (3:9-16)

Through His prophet, the LORD summoned the nations to gather and prepare for war (3:9). Contrary to the Millennial kingdom and its peace (when the weapons of war will be fashioned into plows, Micah 4:3), the LORD commanded the nations to “beat [their] plowshares into swords, and [their] pruninghooks into spears” (3:10). The nations of the world will assemble for battle (3:11), for the LORD was prepared to judge them “in the valley of Jehoshaphat” (its geographic al location cannot be ascertained, 3:12).

Drawing a picture of Himself as a farmer readied to harvest, the nations of the world were portrayed as ripe for judgment. The LORD’s judgment is likened to a farmer coming with his sickle sharpened, and ready to tread nations underfoot like grapes in a vine press (3:13). A multitude will gather against God’s people (3:14), but it is the LORD whose judgment will darken the sun, moon, and stars (3:15). Suddenly, He will “roar out of Zion, And utter his voice from Jerusalem; And the heavens and the earth shall shake: But the Lord will be the hope of his people, And the strength of the children of Israel” (3:16).

The Promise of the LORD’s Perpetual Presence (3:17-21)

Through the LORD’s judgment of the nations, the children of Israel and Judah will come to know Him as “the LORD [their] God” who dwells in Zion (3:17a). The city of Jerusalem would be holy, and no “strangers” (unbelievers) will “pass through her any more” (3:17b). The land will be fertile, the waters will flow, and the River of Life will flow from “the house of the LORD” (3:18). The LORD will avenge the wickedness of Egypt and Edom, for they were guilty of violence and shedding the “innocent blood” of Judah (3:19).

Closing thoughts (3:20-21) – Joel’s prophecies end with the LORD promising Judah the nation will “dwell forever” in the land, “and Jerusalem from generation to generation” (3:20). He will purge the people of their sins, and will forever dwell among them “in Zion” (3:21). Our study of Joel began with a judgment of locusts (Assyria’s army) descending upon Judah and Jerusalem (1:4), and ends with the triumph of God’s people restored to their land and the LORD reigning forever in Jerusalem (3:20-21).

The day of judgment is coming, not only for the nations, but for all men and women. Are you prepared for God’s day of judgment? When the books are opened, and “every man [and woman] will be judged “according to their works?” (Revelation 20:13), will your name be “found written in the book of life?” (Revelation 20:15)

Revelation 20:1515And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Blessed Promise: God’s Promise to Forgive and Restore (Joel 1; Joel 2)

Scripture reading – Joel 1; Joel 2

Our chronological study of the Scriptures brings us to the Book of Joel. Authored by the prophet whose name it bears; Joel is only three chapters in length, and he is therefore named among the minor prophets. The subject of the book was the “Day of the LORD” (Joel 1:15; 2:1, 11, 31; 3:14), and God’s imminent judgment of Judah.

Joel 1

Summons to Old Men (1:2-4)

Summoning the “old men” to hear and give ear, Joel called upon them to testify of the judgment coming upon the nation, and that it was like none other that preceded it (1:2). The severity of God’s judgment would be so great, that it behooved the “old men” to tell the story of God’s judgment to the generations that would follow (1:3). Taking the locust and its four stages of growth as a symbol of four judgments, the portrait was drawn of a vast judgment that might provoke God’s people to repent and turn to the LORD (1:4; Jeremiah 15:3; Ezekiel 14:21).

Summons to the Drunkards (1:5-7)

After awakening the “old men,” the “drunkards” were summoned by Joel (1:5-7). These “drunkards” were a symbol of the hedonistic, pleasure-seeking people who reveled in the pleasures of wine and drunkenness (1:5). The judgment of God would fall upon the drunkards, and “the new wine…[would be] cut off from [their] mouth” (1:5b). Rather than locusts, the judgment of God would be carried out by “a nation [that was] come up upon [the LORD’s] land” (1:6).

Scholars are generally agreed this nation was Assyria, which a century before Joel’s prophecy had taken northern Israel captive (the ten tribes of the north). Described as “strong, and without number,” Assyria’s soldiers were the bane of the ancient world.  Twice we read, the army of Assyria had “the teeth of a lion” (1:6). Joel prophesied the enemy would strip the land bare, wasting the vine (symbol of Judah), and the fig tree (most likely a symbol of Jerusalem, 1:7).

A General Summons to the Congregation (1:8-14)

With Assyria encamped outside the walls of Jerusalem, Joel summoned the people to gather before the LORD and call upon him. He implored the people to cry to the LORD like a young widow mourning the death of her husband (1:8). Judah was impoverished, and there was no harvest, therefore no offerings to the LORD (1:9-10). The farmer was commanded to bemoan the failure of his crops, and “be…ashamed” (1:11). Of the workers of the orchards, it was said their “joy [was] withered away,” for the vines and the fruit trees were withered (1:12). The priests and ministers [Levites] who assisted them were called to mourn and lament, for there were no offerings to present to the LORD (1:13).

Joel longed for the LORD to deliver Jerusalem from the enemy, and he called the people to gather at the Temple and display signs of repentance: Fast (sign of grief), “solemn assembly” (a common sorrow), gather at the Temple (a public sign of repentance), and “cry unto the LORD” to save them (1:14).

A Prophetic Lamentation (1:15-20)

Understanding only the LORD could save Judah, Joel cried, “15Alas for the day! for the day of the Lord is at hand [Day of Judgment]” (1:15). The siege of Jerusalem brought famine (“meat cut off before our eyes”), and a time of sorrow (1:16). There was no harvest, no offerings, and the barns rotted and the crops withered (1:17). The beasts failed, for there was no pastures (1:18). Joel cried to the LORD, “19O Lord, to thee will I cry” for all was lost without the LORD’s help (1:19-20).

Joel 2 – The Day of the LORD, the Day of Judgment

Joel’s penitent prayer for Jerusalem (Zion), continued in chapter 2, as the prophet summoned the priests to pray for the nation. “Blow ye the trumpet,” sound the alarm, “let all the inhabitants of the land tremble: for the day of the LORD” was imminent (2:1). The judgment the LORD brought upon Judah by Assyria was described as, “2A day of darkness and of gloominess, A day of clouds and of thick darkness” (2:2a).

The Assyrian armies that marched through Judah had destroyed everything in their path (2:3), and the army encamped outside Jerusalem was mighty and terrifying to look upon (2:4-5). All nations, walled fortresses, and cities had fallen to Assyria, and without the LORD, there was no hope for Jerusalem (2:6-9). Indeed, the whole earth trembled, and in the words of the prophet, even the sun, moon, and stars were moved by the sight of the great army of Assyria (2:10-11).

 Why was the LORD bringing this great judgment upon Judah and Jerusalem? (2:12-32)

It was to the end the people would repent of their sin, turn to the LORD with all their “heart, and with fasting, and with weeping, and with mourning” (2:12). Joel exhorted the people, “rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the LORD your God” (2:13). Cut away the callousness of your sinful hearts and repent, for “the LORD your God is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil” (2:13). Joel longed for a national revival, and called upon the priests to, “weep between the porch and the altar, and let them say, Spare thy people…[lest the heathen] say among the people, Where is their God?” (2:16-17).

Closing thoughts – Joel’s longing for revival should be the passion of every believer. Yet, the LORD requires His children to acknowledge and confess their sins, and turn to the LORD. Repentance might bring with it the LORD’s gracious promise to “restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten” (2:25).

Believer, you cannot get back the time you have wasted in sin, but the LORD is merciful. In His grace He is able, and may repay what was lost in your foolishness, and give you cause to praise His name (2:26).

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

The Defeat of Gog of Magog (Ezekiel 38; Ezekiel 39)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 38; Ezekiel 39

You may recognize today’s Scripture reading if you are a student of Bible prophecy. Ezekiel 38 and 39 have been the subject of much debate in the past century. I acknowledge there are various interpretations for today’s passage, and I do not want to add my voice among the speculations, nor add to the confusion.

Remembering many prophecies have an immediate application and a far-reaching implication, I believe the near setting of today’s study was in the decades and centuries after Israel returned from captivity. The far-reaching implication has been suggested by some to reflect the gathering of the nations against Israel preceding the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.

Whatever your interpretation, the overriding lesson for me is the oversight and loving compassion the LORD has for Israel, His chosen people.

Ezekiel 38

Ezekiel was commanded to prophesy against Gog, the ruler of the land of Magog, who was identified as “the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal” (38:1-2). Many have suggested “Magog” is today’s Russia, and the cities “Meshech and Tubal” are Russian cities we know today as Moscow and Tobolsk. I am satisfied to name Gog as the king of Magog, whom the LORD would employ to move a coalition of nations from the north against Israel (Persia, Ethiopia, Libya, and Gomer might be identified as nations of today’s Middle East, 38:5-6).

Though it was Gog who sat his heart on invading Israel, it was the LORD who brought forth (figuratively, putting hooks in his jaws, 38:4) to the end He would accomplish His divine purpose. The armies of Magog and its allies would descend upon Israel “like a storm…[and] like a cloud to cover the land” (38:9). All this evil would spring from the mind of Gog, that he might make spoil of Israel (38:12-15). Yet, it was the LORD who determined He would destroy those armies of the heathen that gathered against Israel (38:16-18).

King Gog and his coalition of nations would come to destroy Israel, but they would face the God of Israel who in His jealousy and wrath, would send “a great shaking in the land of Israel” (38:19). The whole earth, and all its creatures would be shaken by the earthquake, and men would be terrified (38:20). In their confusion, the soldiers would turn on each other until “every man’s sword [would] be against his brother” (38:21). The LORD would send “pestilence” (disease), and rain, hail, fire, and brimstone would fall from the sky (38:22).

Closing thought (38:23) – We do not find any mention of Israel sending soldiers against the invading armies, for it was the LORD who determined His name would be magnified among the nations, and they would know and acknowledge Him as “the LORD” (38:23).

Ezekiel 39 – Burying the Dead

As we noted in Ezekiel 38, the LORD intervened and gave Israel a victory over insurmountable odds, thus defeating her enemies. The task of burying the dead would take seven months (39:14). Corpses would fill the land of Israel, and birds and beasts of prey would feed upon the dead (39:4). The LORD’s wrath also turned against the land of Magog and her allies, for Ezekiel foretold the LORD would “send a fire,” that “they shall know that [He is] the LORD” (39:5). Israel would witness the LORD make His holy name known not only to His people, but also to the heathen (39:7). In that day, Israel would gather the weapons of war and burn them for seven years that the land might ultimately be cleansed (39:8-10).

Closing thoughts (39:21-29) – Throughout our study of Ezekiel, the LORD has stated one overriding purpose for His judgments: To the end His people and the nations would know He is God, the LORD and Sovereign of the earth. It was His desire that the heathen would see His glory, and His judgment executed (39:21). It was to the end the “house of Israel [would] know [acknowledge] that [He] was the Lord their God from that day and forward.” (39:22; note 39:28).

Sometimes we wonder why trials and troubles come upon us. Have you considered it may be to the end you will humble yourself, and confess He is “the LORD” and sovereign of your life?

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd, Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

A Valley of Dry Bones, and Israel’s Resurrection (Ezekiel 36; Ezekiel 37)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 36; Ezekiel 37

Ezekiel warned the Edomites the wrath of the LORD would be poured out on their nation because they continued in their hatred toward Israel (Ezekiel 35). Edom coveted the land God promised Israel for an inheritance, therefore, Ezekiel was commanded to “prophesy unto the mountains of Israel” (Ezekiel 36:1).

Ezekiel 36 – A Far-reaching Message for Israel

With Jerusalem destroyed and the land of Judah desolate (for the Jews were taken captive to Babylon), Edom boasted “the ancient high places are ours in possession” (36:2). The land promised to Abraham as an inheritance (Genesis 12:6-8), and given to the Twelve Tribes of Israel as a possession, was occupied by Edomites. (36:2). They had devoured and blasphemed the land that was Israel’s inheritance (37:3).

God Promised to Remember the Land, and Judge Edom (36:4-7)

Ezekiel called upon the mountains, hills, rivers, and valleys of Israel, and declared the wrath of God was stirred against Edom (36:4-5). With Israel and Judah exiled, the Edomites gleefully took that which was not theirs (36:5-6), but would bear the wrath of the LORD, and “their shame” (36:7).

God’s Promise to Restore the Land (36:8-15)

The children of Israel and the land of Israel are inseparable in the heart of God. Though that land has been a land of violence and war through the centuries, it was nevertheless the habitation God had placed His name, and which will one day be the seat of His millennial kingdom.

Though Edom occupied the land in Ezekiel’s day, the LORD revealed Israel would return, and the land would once again be fruitful (36:8-10). In that day, the population would grow, the cities would be rebuilt, and the people would acknowledge the LORD as sovereign (36:11). Israel would take possession of her land, and the day would come when wars would cease and peace would reign (36:12-15). (Though Israel returned to her land after 70 years in captivity, and today the Jews occupy the land, the promise of all the tribes of Israel returning, and lasting peace is still future).

God’s Care and Promises for Israel (36:16-38)

We are reminded that Israel and Judah were in captivity as God’s judgment of their wickedness (36:16-21). The people had murdered, worshipped idols, and profaned the name of the LORD before the heathen (36:16-21). They provoked the wrath of God with their sins, and He had scattered His people among the nations of the earth (36:18-19). Yet, the LORD had not forsaken Israel, and promised He would restore His people for His own name’s sake (36:22-2). Israel would return to her land, and the nations of the earth would know He is “the LORD” (36:23). (Ezekiel 36:24-38 recorded fifteen promises God would fulfill when Israel and Judah returned as one nation to the land.)

Ezekiel 37 – A Vision and Picture of Israel’s Resurrection

Ezekiel’s valley of dry bones has captured the imagination of believers through the centuries. The prophet declared “the hand of the LORD” carried him “in the spirit of the LORD, and set [him] down in the midst of the valley which was full of bones” (36:1).

A Valley Full of Dead Men’s Bones (37:1-2)

The valley of bones was a picture of death, and we read Ezekiel walked among the bones (37:2a). The bones in the valley were “many” and “very dry” (for there was no life in the bones, 37:2).

Ezekiel’s Commission (37:3-6)

What purpose might a prophet serve in a valley of dead men’s bones? The LORD asked Ezekiel, “Son of man, can these bones live?” (37:3a) The prophet wisely answered the LORD, “O Lord God, thou knowest” (37:3b). The LORD then commanded Ezekiel, “Prophesy upon these bones, and say unto them, O ye dry bones, hear the word of the Lord” (37:4). Echoing the commission of a preacher, Ezekiel was to call upon the dead, and the LORD promised, “Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live” (37:5). With the promise the LORD would bring the bones together, cover them with flesh and skin (37:6), Ezekiel prophesied (37:7a).

Suddenly, there was a great stirring of bones in the valley, as the bones of men (perhaps slain in battle and left there) began to “come together, bone to his bone” (37:7b). When the bodies were covered with muscle and skin, Ezekiel observed, “there was no breath in them” (37:8). The LORD commanded the prophet to summon the wind to “come from the four winds” (symbolic of the Spirit of God), and “breathe upon these slain, that they may live” (37:9). Ezekiel obeyed, “and the breath came into them, and they lived, and stood up upon their feet, an exceeding great army” (37:10).

Interpretation of the Vision (37:11-14)

The valley of dry bones was “the whole house of Israel” (the northern and southern kingdoms who were exiled and scattered among the nations, 37:11). The message for the people of the captivity: God was not finished with Israel, and He would revive and resurrect Israel from the grave of captivity (37:12). The LORD promised Israel would return to her land (37:13-14a), and that which the LORD had spoken, He promised to complete (37:14).

Vision of Two Sticks Joined: Israel and Judah will Become One Nation (37:15-28)

With the news, Jerusalem was destroyed, the future looked bleak for the Jews of the captivity. To give the people hope, Ezekiel was commanded to use an illustration of two sticks, that he joined together symbolizing the reunification of Israel and Judah as one nation, and one king (37:19-2).

Who was the king? He would be one of David’s lineage, and would reign as “prince for ever” (37:24-25). This prophecy will be fulfilled when Christ returns to reign in Jerusalem during His millennial kingdom. In that day, He will dwell among men, “and will be their God, and they shall be [His] people” (37:27). What a glorious day that will be!

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd, Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Warning: You Will Reap What You Sow! (Ezekiel 35)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 35

After prophesying against the spiritual shepherds of Israel, for they had put themselves before the welfare of the people (Ezekiel 34:2-6), Ezekiel prophesied “against mount Seir” (a name for the region of Edom, 35:2). The Edomites, descendants of Esau, the brother of the patriarch Jacob, were located in the region southeast of Israel, and south of the Dead Sea. They had despised Israel and Judah, and were guilty of taking pleasure in the sorrows and sufferings of those nations.

Ezekiel 35

The LORD came to Ezekiel, and commanded His prophet to prophesy against Edom, saying, “Thus saith the Lord God; Behold, O mount Seir [Edom], I am against thee, and I will stretch out mine hand against thee, and I will make thee most desolate. 4I will lay thy cities waste, and thou shalt be desolate, and thou shalt know that I am the Lord” (35:3-4). Following the destruction of Edom as a people and nation, their land would be left uninhabited, and their cities laid waste, that they might know the God of Israel was “the LORD” (35:4).

The Edomites Hated God’s People (35:5-9)

They were related to the tribes through the line of Esau, Jacob’s twin brother, and were sons of Isaac, the son of Abraham. Edom had a long history of hatred and violence against the children of Israel. The Edomites had shed the blood of Israel, and provoked God’s wrath (35:5). The LORD therefore, determined the blood of Edom would be shed, the people killed, and their land left desolate (35:6-7). The slaughter of the people would be so complete, it was foretold the mountains, valleys, and hills would be filled with the bodies of the slain (35:7-9). The cities of Edom would not be rebuilt, and the people would know that which was done was of the LORD (35:9).

The Edomites Coveted Israel’s Inheritance (35:10-11)

Taking pleasure in the destruction of Jerusalem, and the Jews being led away captive to Babylon, the Edomites claimed the land the LORD had given Israel and Judah as an inheritance (35:10). Through His prophet, the LORD declared the Edomites would reap what they had sown, and the LORD would glorify His name in their judgment (35:11).

The Edomites Slandered Israel, and Defied God (35:12-14)

Edom mocked and scorned the “mountains of Israel” (i.e., the leaders of Israel). When Jerusalem fell, the Edomites rejoiced and aspired to claim the land for themselves (35:12). They boasted against Israel’s God, and provoked Him to declare, “I have heard them” (35:13).

Having provoked the wrath of the LORD, Ezekiel declared the nations of the earth would rejoice when Edom was left desolate (35:14). The prophet Malachi would look back upon the judgment of Edom, and remember the LORD declared, “I hated Esau (Edom), and laid his mountains and his heritage waste” (Malachi 1:3).

Closing thoughts (35:15) – Edom took pleasure in the overthrow of Jerusalem, and the desolation of Israel and Judah. The LORD, being just, declared the Edomites would suffer the same sorrows (35:15a).  What Edom (“mount Seir, and all Idumea)” had sown as a nation, they would reap, to the end the people would know the God of Israel was Sovereign and that He was “the LORD” (35:15b).

Times change, and nations come and go, but the principle of Sowing and Reaping is a constant, immutable truth.

Galatians 6:77Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

Ezekiel: God’s Watchman on the Wall (Ezekiel 33; Ezekiel 34)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 33; Ezekiel 34

Ezekiel 33 moved the focus of our Scripture readings from God’s judgment of Egypt and the nations (Ezekiel 29-32), to the prophet Ezekiel’s responsibility to serve the LORD as His watchman. Ezekiel’s task was not an enviable one. He was charged to deliver a message to the people of the captivity, and it was one they despised. Ezekiel’s task was to remind the nation of its past, discern the times, and declare God’s judgment should the people continue in their sins.

Ezekiel 33 – God Provided His People a Watchman

Far from Jerusalem, and living as a captive in Babylon, Ezekiel was charged with speaking the word of the LORD “to the children of [his] people” (33:2). God provided His people watchmen, whose ministry was to warn the sword of judgment was come into the land (33:2). Some of the watchmen were faithful to their tasks, but there were many who failed to sound the warning (“blow the trumpet”), and thus left the people unprepared, and unprotected.

Ezekiel was told, when a faithful watchman sounds the warning, and the people refuse to heed the sound of the trumpet, their blood was on their own head. Yet, should the prophet fail the nation, and not warn them, the blood of the people would be upon his head as God’s watchmen (33:3-6).

Ezekiel was Israel’s Watchman (33:7-11)

The LORD called and commissioned Ezekiel to be a “watchman unto the house of Israel” (33:7), and it was his task to hear the LORD and warn the nation (33:7). He was to warn the wicked saying, “thou shalt surely die,” but should Ezekiel fail, the blood of the wicked would be upon his hand (33:8). Yet, if Ezekiel was a faithful prophet, and the wicked refused to heed his warning, he would be delivered from the guilt of their blood when they perished (33:9). His mission was to call the people to repent, and assure them the LORD would extend His compassion (33:10-11).

Righteous Repentance vs. Righteous Work (33:12-16)

Lest any believe salvation by grace through faith is a New Testament doctrine, or that the saints of the Old Testament placed their faith in works to merit God’s favor, the LORD declared to Ezekiel: “The righteousness of the righteous shall not deliver him in the day of his transgression” (33:12).

Good works do not save, they never have and they never will.  Only God can save! Those who trust in their own righteousness “shall not be remembered; but for his iniquity that he hath committed, he shall die for it” (33:13). Yet, the wicked who repent of their sins, turn to the LORD and prove their faith by walking in His will “shall surely live, he shall not die” (33:15). Indeed, the wicked who have repented are promised, “16None of his sins that he hath committed shall be mentioned unto him: he hath done that which is lawful and right; he shall surely live” (33:16).

News of Jerusalem’s Destruction (33:21-26)

The year was 585 BC, “the twelfth year of [the] captivity, in the tenth month, in the fifth day of the month” (33:21), a messenger from Jerusalem arrived in Babylon. Having escaped the city under siege, he brought the dreaded news Ezekiel had prophesied should come to pass: “The city is smitten” (33:21c). The prophet shared how, the evening before the messenger arrived, “the hand of the LORD was upon” him (31:23). The LORD put in Ezekiel’s mouth His words, and revealed the cause of God’s judgment.

In their pride, the children of Israel boasted confidently of the Abrahamic lineage, and asserted the land of Israel was their inheritance (33:23-24). Yet, their sins brought God’s judgment, for they had defiled the land with their wickedness (32:25-26).

The Consequences of Israel’s Sins (33:27-29)

The fall of Jerusalem was only the beginning of sorrows for those who survived the destruction of the city. Those who fled the city would be slain by the sword, and others would be killed by wild beasts in the fields (33:27a). Some sheltered in caves, only to perish of disease (33:27b). Jerusalem’s pride in her strength came to an end, and the land was left desolate (33:28). All this that the people would know the judgment was come upon them “because of all their abominations which they [had] committed” (33:29).

Ezekiel: A Persecuted Prophet (33:30-33)

One would think the affirmation of all Ezekiel prophesied would command the respect of the people in captivity, but it did not. Instead, the LORD warned His prophet, “the children of thy people still are talking against thee by the walls and in the doors of the houses, and speak one to another, every one to his brother” (30:30). Some came to Ezekiel and made a pretense of listening to the word of the LORD through His prophet (33:30), but they were hypocrites. With their mouths they claimed to love the LORD, but “their heart goeth after their covetousness” (33:31). They complimented the prophet on his voice, and heard his words, but refused to obey (33:32).

Ezekiel 34 – The Failure of Unfaithful Pastors

The prophet took the unfaithful shepherds of Israel to task in Ezekiel 34. Men who were entrusted with shepherding, and leading God’s people had failed them. They had taken advantage of the people, and abused their roles as pastors of Israel (34:1-8). Because they failed to feed and shepherd His people, the LORD warned, “I am against the shepherds” (34:9-10).  In spite of the dire state of the children of Israel, the LORD comforted Ezekiel and assured him He would one day gather His people together as a loving shepherd gathers His sheep (34:11-31).

Closing thoughts (33:33) – What comfort might the prophet take from this great tragedy? Jerusalem was destroyed, and Judah was a desolate land. The people of the captivity not only refused to repent and turn to the LORD, they persecuted His prophet.

Though he was rejected by his people, Ezekiel was assured the time would come, and “lo, it will come,” when the people would know and remember, “a prophet hath been among them” (33:33).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

The Finale of the Nations (Ezekiel 32)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 32

Egypt continues to be the primary subject of our current study, as we conclude this section that foretold God’s judgment against all the nations of the world. The prophecy before us was given in the twelfth year of Ezekiel’s exile to Babylon.

The Inescapable Judgment of the Nations (32:1-16)

A Lament for Pharaoh, king of Egypt (32:2-6)

The LORD commanded Ezekiel, “take up a lamentation for Pharaoh king of Egypt” (32:2), and compared the harsh reign of the king to a “young lion of the nations…whale [perhaps a crocodile] among the seas,” and a trouble to his people (represented as “the waters,” 32:2). For his wickedness, the LORD foretold He would cast the net of His judgment upon Pharaoh and Egypt (32:3). The king would be dragged from his throne, and figuratively cast into the wilderness where the nations of the earth would feed upon his flesh (32:4-5). The waters of Egypt would be stained red with the blood of the people (32:6).

A Dreadful Picture of God’s Final Judgment (32:7-10)

As we have seen in earlier studies, prophecies often carry an immediate implication and a far-reaching application, and so it is in the passage before us. Ezekiel 32:7-10 describes the imminent judgment of God as a time of great darkness, even as it will be in the last days (Isaiah 13:9-11: 34:1-4; Matthew 24:29-31; Revelation 6:12-17; 8:12). The heart of the nations will be troubled, and the people will shrink back in horror (32:10).

Nebuchadnezzar: The Agent of God’s Judgment (32:11-16)

Leaving no room for ambiguity, Ezekiel prophesied Egypt’s fall to Babylon was determined (32:11), and the ruthless reputation of Babylon was portrayed as “the terrible of the nations” (32:12). Nebuchadnezzar’s army would wreak havoc on the land, spoil the treasures of Egypt, and kill the people and livestock (32:12-13). The nations of the world would look upon Egypt’s sorrows and lament her fall (32:16).

The Nations Sentenced to Hell (32:17-32)

Picturing Hell for what it is, a place of death and torment for sinners who reject the LORD and His Word (32:17-32), the Egyptians were warned they would suffer the fate of other nations (32:18). Assyria was fallen to Babylon, and we read of her slain, their “graves are set in the sides of the pit [hell]” (32:23). Assyria joined other ancient nations who made their graves in hell: Elam, Meshech, Tubal, Edom, and Zidon had all borne “their shame with them that go down to the pit” (32:24-30).

Pharoah and Egypt would not be spared or favored above the nations, and Ezekiel warned, “thou shalt be broken in the midst of the uncircumcised, and shalt lie with them that are slain with the sword” (32:28). The king of Egypt and his army would be “slain by the sword” (32:31), and Pharaoh would take his place “in the midst of the uncircumcised” with the eternal damned (32:32).

Closing thought – Ezekiel’s prophecies of the coming judgments of Egypt and the nations concluded with the words, “saith the LORD God” (32:32). All the LORD revealed to Ezekiel came to pass, and the people and nations of the earth that rejected the LORD perished.

I look forward to sharing with you the balance of the chapters in Ezekiel, for they foretell a glorious future for God’s people (Ezekiel 33:1-39:29).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.

God is Slow to Wrath, But His Judgments are Sure (Ezekiel 28; Ezekiel 29)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 28; Ezekiel 29

God’s displeasure with the nations that had taken joy in the destruction of Jerusalem continued in Ezekiel 28.  As a great city of ancient times, Tyrus was addressed in Ezekiel 26 and 27, and continues to be the subject of our study in Ezekiel 28. Though the prophet was commanded to once again speak to Tyrus, it was the king, the “prince [king] of Tyrus” that was his subject (28:2).

The LORD came to Ezekiel with an indictment of the “prince [king] of Tyrus” (28:2), but the verses that followed revealed this king was more than a mere mortal. He represented the embodiment of evil; the demonic forces that are ever present in the governments of the nations of the world. The apostle Paul wrote of the same demonic presence in his day writing, “12For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places” (Ephesians 6:12). As you will see, the king of Tyrus was a symbol of a presence and power greater than man (28:11-15).

Ezekiel 28

Provoked by the pride of the king of Tyrus, the LORD brought an indictment against that ruler (28:2-5). The king boasted he was powerful and his throne was equal to that of God. In fact, he boasted, “I am a God” (28:2). Proud of his intelligence, he boasted he was wiser than the prophet Daniel, and no secret was hidden from him (28:3). Shrewd in commerce, the king was wealthy, and believed himself equal to God (28:6).

Fourfold Judgment of the King of Tyrus (28:6-10)

Remembering, “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18), we are not surprised when we read God declared he would destroy the proud king of Tyrus. The king felt his kingdom was unconquerable, but the LORD stirred up the king of Babylon (“the terrible of the nations,” 28:7), who would bring his army against Tyrus and bring the king to a violent end (28:8). The fall of the king would be so great, the world would look upon him, and know he was a man (28:8-9). His death would come by “the hand of strangers” (29:10).

King of Tyre, A Symbol of Satan (28:11-15)

Here we find recorded a contrast between the pride of the king of Tyrus and that of Satan. Like the king, Lucifer (Satan) boasted against God (Isaiah 14:12-15). In reality, the king of Tyrus was a puppet in the hand of that evil one.

Ezekiel records a depiction of Lucifer (28:12-19), who was the model of perfection, perfect wisdom and beauty (28:12). Only of Satan could it be said, “thou hast been in Eden the garden of God” (28:13). Like the ephod of the high priest of Israel whose breastplate was adorned with precious stones, Lucifer had been a being of beauty, and was created by God (28:13b). He was a musician (28:13c), and ordained as the guardian cherub about the throne of God (28:14). Before sin entered into him and he rebelled, he had been a sinless being, “perfect in [his] ways (28:15). As Satan was cast out of heaven, so the king of Tyrus would be cast from his throne, and made a spectacle for he dared boast against the God of heaven (28:16-19).

Prophecy Against Zidon (28:20-23)

Zidon was a sister city of Tyrus, and was located some 20 miles north of the capital city. Like Tyrus, Zidon would suffer a calamitous destruction. “Pestilence” (plagues, disease, sickness) and the blood of violence and war would stain her streets (28:23). All of this suffering and sorrow, to the end the nations would know and confess the God of Israel was “the LORD” (28:22, 23).

Tyus and Zidon would be annihilated, but the LORD promised He would gather “the house of Israel” and return His people to their land (28:24-25). Peace and prosperity would be restored to God’s people, and they would “dwell safely…build houses, and plant vineyards…[and] dwell with confidence” (28:26; 2 Chronicles 36:22-23; Ezra 1).

Ezekiel 29 – The Judgment of Egypt

It was in the tenth year of Ezekiel’s exile (I believe coinciding with king Jehoiachin being taken prisoner to Babylon), that the LORD came to the prophet with a pronouncement of judgment “against Pharoah king of Egypt” (29:1-2). The stated determination of the LORD to begin His judgment with Pharaoh continues for four chapters, concluding with Ezekiel 32.

Seven judgments are stated against Egypt and its ruler, with the first two recorded in Ezekiel 29. Like the king of Tyrus, Pharaoh was guilty of pride, boasting he was sovereign of Egypt’s wealth and the Nile River was his (foolishly boasting, “I have made it for myself,” 29:3).

Portraying Himself as a divine fisherman, the LORD warned He would set a hook in Pharaoh’s jaws and pull him and “all the fish of the rivers” (the people) “into the wilderness” (29:4-5). The purpose of God’s judgments is stated again, “Egypt shall know that I am the LORD” (29:6). Pharaoh had also betrayed the trust of Judah, and for that reason the LORD declared he would splinter Egypt like a reed (29:7).

For her sins, “the land of Egypt [would] be desolate and waste” and not “be inhabited for forty years” (29:8-11). Yet, unlike Assyria and Tyrus, Ezekiel prophesied God would mercifully restore the people of Egypt to her lands (29:13), though Egypt would never again be a great world empire (29:14-16).

Closing thoughts (29:18-21) – Tyrus and Egypt would pay for their sins, and Nebuchadnezzar did serve as the LORD’s agent of judgment. Though Babylon’s siege against Tyrus lasted 13 years and was a great expense, God determined to repay Nebuchadnezzar with the vast wealth of Egypt. From the spoils of Egypt, the king of Babylon paid his army (29:19).

Warning: Grave consequences befall those that persecute, and take pleasure in the sorrows and sufferings of God’s people. 

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Heart of A Shepherd Inc is recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3, and is a public charitable organization. Mailing address: Heart of A Shepherd Inc, 6201 Ehrlich Rd., Tampa, FL 33625. You can email HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com for more information on this daily devotional ministry.