Category Archives: Depression

The Way of the Wicked (2 Samuel 4; Psalm 6)

Scripture reading – 2 Samuel 4; Psalm 6

The events in 2 Samuel 4 are another reminder that humanity has not changed. Evil men struggle for power, riches, and influence, and the treachery and deceit found in our Scripture readings are as present in our day as they were in ancient times.

2 Samuel 4

The Plot to Kill, Ishbosheth, King of Israel (4:1-4)

When the news of Abner’s death (3:26-27) reached Saul’s son, Ishbosheth was so overcome with fear that “his hands were feeble [i.e., became limp], and all the Israelites were troubled” (4:1). With the captain of his army dead, Ishbosheth realized his days as king were numbered.

Two brothers, Baanah and Rechab (4:2-3), supposed the death of Abner provided them an opportunity to exact revenge against the house of Saul (for that king had slain many Gibeonites who lived in Beeroth, 2 Samuel 21:1-2). Besides Ishbosheth, the son of Saul, there was one other male of Saul’s household, Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan; however, he was lame and unfit to be king (4:4). With Ishbosheth dead, Baanah and Rechab reasoned the last obstacle to David becoming king of Israel would be removed, and they would be rewarded.

The Assassination of Ishbosheth (4:5-8)

Under the pretense of gathering grain, possibly as compensation to their band of soldiers, Rechab and Baanah entered the palace. Finding Ishbosheth sleeping, they killed him upon his bed, and beheaded him (4:5-7). Carrying the head of the king as proof he had been slain, Rechab and Baanah traveled through the night, and “brought the head of Ishbosheth unto David to Hebron” (4:8). Imagining they would be rewarded, they said to David, “Behold the head of Ishbosheth the son of Saul thine enemy, which sought thy life; and the Lord hath avenged my lord the king this day of Saul, and of his seed” (4:8).

David Condemned the Murderous Actions of Rechab and Baanah (4:9-12)

Reflecting on the LORD’S faithfulness during his wilderness years, David certainly did not need Rechab and Baanah to slay Ishbosheth (4:9). Drawing upon how he had ordered the death of the Amalekite soldier that had claimed to slay King Saul (2 Samuel 1), David condemned the two brothers for slaying Ishbosheth, “a righteous person in his own house upon his bed” (4:11).

David then “commanded his young men, and they slew [Rechab and Baanah], and cut off their hands and their feet, and hanged them up over the pool in Hebron” (4:12). Because the pool in Hebron was a public gathering place, hanging the limbs of the slain served as a testimony and a warning to Israel. A testimony that David had no part in the assassination of Ishbosheth. It was also a warning to any who might be tempted to betray David in the future. David, however, made certain “the head of Ishbosheth” was given an honorable burial “in the sepulchre of Abner in Hebron” (4:12).

Closing thought: We should not be surprised that when there is no law, evil men commit heinous acts of treachery, and murder. The wicked actions of Rechab and Baanah, and their expectation to be rewarded for murdering Ishbosheth, is the way of the world. David, however, proved to be a righteous man, and his judgment to put Rechab and Baanah to death was according to the Law (Genesis 9:6, Exodus 21:12; Leviticus 24:17,21).

Psalm 6Suffering, Sorrows and Setbacks

The setting and historical context of Psalm 6 is not known; however, David is identified as its author. Time and space do not allow me to do an in-depth study of Psalm 6; however, I trust my brief overview might be a blessing.

Psalm 6:2 2  Have mercy [Be gracious; show favor] upon me, O LORD; for I am weak: O LORD, heal [cure; make whole] me; for my bones [i.e. body; substance] are vexed [troubled; tremble; alarmed; disturbed]

Psalm 6:5-7 5  For in death there is no remembrance [memory; memorial] of thee: in the grave [hell; the pit; Sheol] who shall give thee thanks [praise; revere]?

6 I am weary [faint; exhausted; grown weary] with my groaning [sighing; mourning]; all the night make I my bed to swim [inundate; i,e, swimming with tears]; I water [melt; dissolve] my couch [i.e., bed with a canopy] with my tears [weeping]

7  Mine eye [sight; appearance] is consumed [dimmed; waste away] because of grief [sorrow; anger]; it waxeth old  [grows old; fails] because of all mine enemies [distress; pains].”

Believer, if you find yourself in the midst of trials, and your soul is burdened and weary of life…take heart; the saints of God are strengthened in their faith when they, in the midst of the extremity of their weakness, turn to the Lord.

Many are the saints that have experienced the sorrows of trials, and can readily identify with David’s sleepless nights.  How many have cried themselves to sleep, because of the sinful choices of one they loved?  How many parents have grown weary, bearing the sorrows and trials heaped upon them by children who have chosen a path of sin? Take heart…God hears your cries.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

A Cry for Forgiveness and Help (Psalms 129-130)

Scripture reading Psalms 129-130

We continue our study of the psalms titled, “A Song of Degrees.” For today’s Scripture reading (Psalm 129-130), I have made an effort to amplify some words to strengthen the reader’s understanding of the psalms. [Bracketed words in italics are those of this author.]

Psalm 129 – Israel’s Reflections on Her Persecutions and Her Prayer for Justice

As with an earlier Psalm, I believe the song leader introduced the theme of Psalm 129 in the first verse, and the congregation echoed the words of the song leader in the second verse, adding the triumphant phrase, “Yet they [Israel’s enemies] have not prevailed [have power; overcome] against me” (129:2).

Psalm 129:1–3 – 1Many a time have they afflicted [treated harshly or with hostility] me from my youth, May Israel now say: 2Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth: Yet they have not prevailed [have power; overcome]against me. 3The plowers [i.e., engravers; to inscribe] plowed upon my back: They made long their furrows. [may refer to beatings with a whip; harsh criticisms or accusations]

I believe verse 3 refers to the afflictions the people had suffered as a nation. The whips of the enemies had left scars, furrows, upon their backs. Yet, God in His mercy had delivered Israel, and “cut asunder the cords [ropes; bindings] of the wicked” (129:4).

The wicked had prospered for a season, but the psalmist prayed:

Psalm 129:5–6 – 5Let them all [the enemies of the LORD and His people] be confounded [put to shame] and turned back that hate Zion [the mount upon which the Temple was built]. 6Let them be as the grass upon the housetops [the Middle East had flat roofs], Which withereth [dries up in the heat of the sun] afore it groweth up [removed; i.e. taken up]:

Psalm 129:7–8 – 7Wherewith the mower [gatherer] filleth [to be full or filled] not his hand; Nor he that bindeth sheaves his bosom [garment; possibly the picture of carrying grain in the folds of one’s robe]. 8Neither do they which go by say, The blessing [wishing or pronouncing a blessing] of the Lord be upon you: We bless [praise] you in the name of the Lord.

Too often I fear, believers encourage sinners in their sin (2 John 1:11), and bid them words of comfort and blessing, rather than pray they will come to repent (129:7-8).

Psalm 130 – A Cry for Forgiveness, Hope, and Redemption

The words of a penitent sinner are found in the opening verses of Psalm 130. In his guilt and despair, the man had confessed his sin, and pled for the LORD to show him mercy (130:1-2).

Psalm 130:1–2 – 1Out of the depths [deep place] have I cried [cried out; shouted] unto thee, O Lord. 2Lord, hear [listen; give heed] my voice: Let thine ears be attentive [listen; pay attention to] to the voice of my supplications [plea for mercy].

Understanding all are sinners, the psalmist reasoned, 3If thou, Lord, shouldest mark [keep watch; guard; preserve] iniquities [sin; guilt], O Lord, who shall stand? [stand before the LORD]” (130:3).

Confident in the LORD’S mercy, and forgiveness (130:4), he waited on the LORD, and His redemption (130:4-8).

Psalm 130:4–8 – 4But there is forgiveness [pardon] with thee, That thou mayest be feared. [fear; be afraid of God]  5I wait for [hope for] the Lord, my soul doth wait [hope for], And in his word do I hope. [have cause for hope] 6My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch [keeps watch; guard] for the morning [the morning light]: I say, more than they that watch for the morning. 7Let Israel hope [have cause to hope] in the Lord: For with the Lord there is mercy [mercy; kindness; goodness], And with him [the LORD] is plenteous [much] redemption. [paying of an amount or price] 8And he [the LORD] shall redeem [buy out; liberate; pay] Israel [the Twelve tribes from the sons of Jacob] from all his iniquities. [sins; guilt]

Why should a sinner hope in the LORD? Because the LORD is merciful, and compassionate, and has promised to redeem all who come to Him.

1 John 1:99If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

1 John 4:1010Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation [atonement] for our sins.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

The LORD: My Deliverer and Protector (Psalms 124-125)

Scripture reading – Psalm 124; Psalm125

Our study of the Psalms continues with two psalms titled, “A Song of Degrees.” While Psalm 124 bears the name of David as its the author, the author of Psalm 125 is unknown. Both of the psalms are among those believed to have been sung by the priests as they ascended the steps in the Temple.

Psalms 124 – “A Song of Degrees of David.”

I suggest two major themes for Psalm 124. The first, the dangers from which the LORD had saved David and his men.

The phrase, 1If it had not been the Lord who was on our side” is repeated in Psalm 124:1, and again in Psalm 124:2. I believe it is possible a song leader could have sung the first verse, ending the verse with, “Now may Israel say” (124:1). The congregation might have echoed the phrase, 1If it had not been the Lord who was on our side,” and added, “When men rose up against us” (124:2).

If the LORD had not been on the side of David and his men, the enemy (perhaps King Saul) would have “swallowed us [David, and his men] up quick, when their wrath was kindled against us” (123:3). If the LORD had not been on their side, he and his men would have been overwhelmed by their enemy, and swept away in Saul’s wrath like a violent stream sweeps away its victims (124:4-5).

Deliverance is the second theme of Psalm 124.  Like a prey delivered from the teeth of lion (124:6), and a bird set free from a trapper’s snare (124:7), when David called on the name of the LORD, his deliverer was the Creator of heaven and earth (124:8).

Psalms 125

The reference to Mount Zion (125:1) seems to confirm Psalm 125 was a psalm sung by pilgrims ascending the road to Jerusalem and the Temple. Consider the following as an outline for Psalm 125. I suggest you consider four major ideas for the psalm.

The Proclamation – “1They that trust in the Lord shall be as mount Zion, which cannot be removed, but abideth for ever. 2As the mountains are round about Jerusalem, So the Lord is round about his people from henceforth even for ever.” (125:1-2)

We live in world where it seems the wicked often have the advantage. Psalm 125, however, exhorts believers to “trust in the LORD,” for He is like Mount Zion: Unmovable, immutable, unwavering, and He “is round about his people” forever (125:1-2).

The Promise – “3For the rod of the wicked shall not rest upon the lot of the righteous; Lest the righteous put forth their hands unto iniquity.” (125:3)

The wicked threaten, and even smite the saints of God with their rod (i.e., club). Nevertheless, the LORD restrains the wicked, and the rod will not “rest [stay] upon the lot [person] of the righteous” (125:3).

The Prayer4Do good, O Lord, unto those that be good, and to them that are upright in their hearts.” (125:4)

The LORD is loving, and compassionate, and we can be certain He will bless those who please Him with good.

The Pledge – “5As for such as turn aside unto their crooked ways, The Lord shall lead them forth with the workers of iniquity: But peace shall be upon Israel.” (125:5)

The LORD is Just, and those who take the crooked path, will be led along with the “workers of iniquity” and shall perish (125:5). But Israel [the true Israel, those who are the people of God] will enjoy peace (Galatians 6:16; John 14:27).

Closing thoughts: The mountains of Zion afforded Jerusalem a natural, fortified place, secure from her enemies.  Sitting upon the Mount Zion, Jerusalem was an impressive site from a distance and the deep ravines that cut through the mount were formidable.

In the same way Jerusalem enjoyed safety and security on Mount Zion, His people are encouraged to “trust in the LORD,” for He encircles them like the “mountains are round about Jerusalem” (125:1).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Critics Got You Down? Hope in the LORD! (Psalm 123)

Scripture reading – Psalm 123

Our Scripture reading is Psalm 123, and it is in the midst of the psalms that are titled, “A Song of Degrees” (Psalm 120-134). The author of Psalm 123 is not identified, and it would be mere speculation on my part to identify its author by name.

As stated in prior devotions, the psalms identified as “Song of Degrees,” are thought to have been those sung by pilgrims in their ascent to Jerusalem. There is also a great probability the “Song of Degrees” were sung by the priests and Levites as they ascended the steps to the Temple.

I suggest you consider three themes for Psalm 123.

The Focus of the Psalmist: The God of Heaven (123:1)

The psalmist writes, 1Unto thee lift I up mine eyes, O thou that dwellest in the heavens” (123:1). I believe it is instinctive for man to look to the heavens, and the breadth and wonders of the sun, moon, stars, and galaxies, and ponder the Creator of it all. The author of Psalm 97 writes: “6The heavens declare his righteousness, and all the people see his glory” (97:6). The LORD “dwellest in the heavens,” for He is Sovereign, and sits upon His throne. The prophet Isaiah was given a vision of God upon His throne, and he wrote, “I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple…[and the seraphims] cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of hosts: The whole earth is full of his glory” (Isaiah 6:1-3).

The Heart of the Psalmist: He looked to the LORD for His Will (123:2)

I invite you to consider four “looks” in verse 2. The first, a look of deference: Rather than the pride of his enemies, the psalmist looked to the LORD as “servants look unto the hand of their masters” (123:2a); a look of humility and servitude. Notice also a look of dependence: for the psalmist describes himself as looking to the hand of the LORD to meet his needs, “servants look unto the hand of their masters, And as the eyes of a maiden unto the hand of her mistress” (123:2b). A third look I notice is the look for direction: This is a longing, expectant, look that “[waits] upon the Lord” (123:2c). There is finally, a look of determination: To wait upon the LORD “until that he have mercy upon us” (123:2d).

The Hope of the Psalmist: A Cry for Mercy (123:3-4)

The psalmist’s cry to the LORD appears to be one of desperation. He cried, “3Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy upon us:” (123:3a). He had been the object of contempt, scorn, and mocking (123:3b). He longed for God to fill him with his loving mercies, and grace. Who were those who had treated him with scorn? Who had heaped upon him such sorrows?

The psalmist identified them as “those that are at ease…the proud” (123:4). His harsh critics were “at ease,” complacent, lazy, and proud.

Closing thoughts: I have learned that my harshest critics are seldom those who are laboring for the LORD, and serving His people. No, the critics arise from those whom the psalmist describes as “at ease…[and] proud” (123:4).

Let us take a spiritual lesson from the psalmist. He had suffered abuse, and lesser men might have quit; however, he determined to set his focus on his Creator (123:1), turn his heart to the LORD, and cry out for mercy (123:3-4).

Hope in the LORD!

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Psalms of Rejoicing and Praise (Psalms 18; 121)

Scripture reading – Psalms 18; 121

The death of King Saul and his sons concluded a tragic time in Israel’s history (1 Samuel 31). The king’s death, however, marked the ascension of David, the man whom the LORD had chosen to be king, for he was a man after God’s own heart (1 Samuel 13:14).

With today’s Scripture reading (Psalm 18 and Psalm 121), our study introduces us to the Psalms David penned during his reign as king of Israel. To understand the psalms, you must consider them in their historical context, and cultural setting. They were written by the king in a time that was pastoral and agricultural, and far removed from our fast-paced 21st century world. Beautiful and poetic, the psalms reflect the heart of a man who loved the LORD, and cherished His Word, Law, and Commandments. The spiritual breadth of the psalms makes it impossible for me to write an exhaustive exposition of the chapters we will study; however, I pray my meditations and thoughts will enrich your study. [For the sake of brevity, I will limit my focus to only a few verses. The phrases in brackets are the amplification of this author.]

Psalm 18 – A Hymn of Rejoicing

The title of Psalm 18 indicates it was a hymn of rejoicing, penned by David on the occasion when the LORD delivered him from Saul, and his enemies. After expressing his deep, and fervent love for the LORD (18:1), David painted a verbal portrait of the LORD using eight descriptive metaphors.

Psalm 18:2 – The LORD is my rock [stronghold; cliff], and my fortress [castle; fort], and my deliverer [Savior; Rescuer]; my God [Almighty God], my strength [rock; mountain], in whom I will trust [confide; have hope; seek refuge]; my buckler [small shield], and the horn [strength] of my salvation [liberty; deliverance; prosperity], and my high tower [defense; refuge].

Rock” and “Fortress” describe the LORD’S loving protection of His people.  David had often sought refuge among the rocks and clefts of the wilderness, and they serve as a reminder that God wants His people to flee to Him in our hour of trouble and need. The LORD is also our “Deliverer” and mighty “God,” and can save us from our enemies by the power of His might.  The LORD is “my Strength,” and He never changes.

David employed three metaphors for the LORD that are suggestive of a battlefield:  The LORD is “my Buckler,” a small shield employed when an enemy presses hard upon us. The LORD is “the Horn of my Salvation,” for He alone has the power to save us. The LORD is, “my High Tower,” a refuge to Whom believers may flee for safety.

Psalm 18:3 – I will call [call to; cry unto] upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised [boast; glory; sing praise]: so shall I be saved [delivered; preserved] from mine enemies [foe; adversary].

There were times when David’s courage waned, and his fears well-nigh overwhelmed him, but the LORD delivered him. Indeed, the LORD alone is worthy to be praised!

Psalm 18:30 – “As for God [“El;” Almighty God], his way is perfect: the word [commandment] of the LORD [Jehovah; Eternal, Self-existent God] is tried [refined; purged by fire; tested]: he is a buckler [small shield] to all those that trust in him [flee to Him for protection; confide; make their refuge].”

It is easy to say, “God’s way is perfect,” when we are free from trials and troubles; however, will we trust God’s way is perfect when our days are shadowed by trials. When we feel the intense heat of trials, and our motives are tried like silver smelting in the fire, will we resolve to trust the LORD? When an enemy maligns us, and friends betray us, will we turn to God’s promises for hope?  Will we trust Him to be our “buckler” (a small shield for hand-to-hand combat), when an enemy means us harm?

David’s hope was revived, His strength renewed, when he reflected on the character of the LORD (18:31), and confessed, “His way is perfect” (18:30), for He is “my rock…[and] the God of my salvation” (18:46).

Psalm 121 – A Pilgrim’s Psalm

Psalm 121 is titled, “A Song of Degrees,” and it is believed it was one of the songs sung by saints of God during their annual pilgrimages.

I suggest four major themes from Psalm 121: The Pledge of the psalmist to seek the LORD (121:1); his Promise to trust Him (121:2); his confidence the LORD was His Protector (121:3-7); and that He was a Perpetual Shepherd and would “preserve [his] going out and [his] coming in from this time forth, and even for evermore” (121:8a).

Believer, there is no place beyond the LORD’S watch. He keeps us when we are young and strong, and when we grow old and frail. He is with us in sickness and in health! He is with us in our down sittings and our uprisings.

If you are a child of God, you are secure in the LORD, and can be assured, Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life” (Psalm 23:6a).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Dead Man Walking; God’s Man Rejoicing (Psalm 63, 1 Samuel 28)

Scripture reading – 1 Samuel 28; Psalm 63

1 Samuel 28 – Dead Man Walking

One might feel a certain empathy for King Saul in the latter years of his reign and life. The king was old, the strength and vitality of his youth faded, and his spirit consumed by bitterness. In contrast, David had been a faithful servant to the king, but Saul’s jealousy had made his friend his enemy. Indeed, the champion of Israel, appeared to be in league with Achish, the Philistine king (28:1-2).

Saul was alone. He had disobeyed God’s command, and the LORD had withdrawn his Spirit from the king (16:14-15). With the prophet Samuel dead (28:3), and the Philistine army gathered against Israel (28:4), Samuel trembled at the sight of “the host of the Philistines” (28:5).

Paralyzed by a spirit of foreboding (28:5-6), and desperate for a word of reassurance, the king disguised himself, violated the Law (Exodus 22:18; Leviticus 19:31), and turned to a witch who consulted with spirits (28:7;Leviticus 20:27). Assuring the witch, she would not be punished, Saul demanded she call the prophet Samuel from the dead (28:11).

The LORD permitted Samuel to appear, and his appearance frightened the witch, who realized the man before her was Saul (28:12). With the king’s assurance that she would come to no harm, the woman revealed she had seen a man, “an old man…covered with a mantle” (28:14). Saul realized the apparition was that of Samuel, and the king “stooped with his face to the ground, and bowed himself” (28:14).

Samuel demanded, “Why hast thou disquieted me [awaken from rest or sleep], to bring me up [from Sheol, the place of the dead]?” (28:15). Trembling with fear, Saul declared how the Philistines had gathered against Israel, and God’s Spirit had departed from him (28:15). He confessed he had no prophet to answer him, and no man to interpret dreams (28:15).

Samuel then reminded Saul he was suffering the consequences of his disobedience (1 Samuel 15:23; 28:18). Not only had God’s Spirit departed from Saul, but the LORD had become his enemy (28:16). The LORD had “rent the kingdom out of [Saul’s] hand, and given it to [his] neighbour, even to David” (28:17).

Revealing the imminent deaths of Saul and his sons, and the defeat Israel would suffer the next day on the battlefield (28:19), Saul fell to the ground, “and there was no strength in him” (28:20). Overcome with emotion, and weak from fasting, the witch took pity on Saul and urged him to eat (28:22-24). When their supper was ended, Saul and his men “rose up, and went away that night” (28:25).

Closing thoughts: Rather than humble himself, and repent, Saul departed with his heart hardened, knowing he would not live to see another night. Because of his sin and disobedience, the king and his sons would die the next day, and his throne would be given to David.

He was a “dead man walking.”

Psalm 63

The title of Psalm 63 gives us the background for the song, for it was “when [David] was in the wilderness of Judah.” You will notice phrases and verses throughout the psalm that are beautiful and expressive.

In light of Saul’s despair in 1 Samuel 28, Psalm 63 affords us an encouraging contrast.  While Saul longed for a word from the LORD, but found his sins had made the LORD his enemy; David’s heart rejoiced in his God, and he confessed:

Psalm 63:11O God, thou art my God; early will I seek thee: My soul thirsteth for thee, My flesh longeth for thee In a dry and thirsty land, where no water is;

Surely, only a man who loved the LORD could find such joy, comfort, and cause for rejoicing in Him.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

When Life is Not Fair (Psalm 35, 54)

Scripture reading – Psalm 35, 54

Today’s Scripture reading continues David’s plea for the LORD to save him from the plots, and traps his enemies had set for him. The title of Psalm 35 is simply, “A Psalm of David.”

Psalm 35

When David penned Psalm 35 is not known; however, his plea for the LORD to render him justice, and save him from his enemies is a familiar theme. Pursued by an army vastly larger than his troop of six hundred men, David found himself in a desperate place. Three times he maintained his innocence with the phrase, “without cause,”and reminded the LORD the injustices he had suffered.

David wrote, “7For without cause have they hid for me their net in a pit, which without cause they have digged for my soul” (35:7). David beseeched the LORD, “19Let not them that are mine enemies wrongfully rejoice over me: Neither let them wink with the eye that hate me without a cause” (35:19).

Friend, it is one thing to face trouble, and suffer for one’s wrongdoing; however, it is quite another when we have done no wrong, and someone desires to destroy us. Unfortunately, you will learn there are times when those whom you trust and love as friends, are often the ones who will betray you.

David asserted, “12They rewarded me evil for good to the spoiling [sorrow] of my soul” (35:12). David had wallowed briefly in a “pity pit” when he reflected on the injustices he had suffered (35:13-16). He remembered mourning for his enemy when he was sick, and how he had fasted and prayed for him (35:13). He had sorrowed for the man who had become his enemy, in the way one would love and mourn for a mother (35:14). Yet, his enemy had rewarded him evil for good (35:12), and rejoiced in his sorrows. He had gathered others against him as a pack of wild animals would hunt, and ravage their prey (35:15-16).

How do you respond to injustices?

It is tempting to wallow in self-pity, and allow anger and bitterness to take hold of your soul. David wrestled with the injustices; however, he turned his focus to the LORD, and called on Him to save him (35:1-3, 17-28). He realized there was nothing he could do to appease his enemies, for they had no desire for peace (35:20).

David had searched his heart for wrongdoing, and then he turned to the LORD knowing He is a faithful, and true Judge, and said, “24Judge me, O Lord my God, according to thy righteousness; and let them not rejoice over me” (35:24).

Trusting the LORD would hear and answer his prayer, David remembered there were some who had not betrayed him. Looking beyond his sorrows, he looked forward to the day he would be delivered from his enemy, and his friends would “shout for joy, and be glad” (35:27). He was not yet free from his troubles, but he promised the LORD he would boldly speak of His righteousness, and “praise [Him] all the day long” (35:28).

Psalm 54

The title of Psalm 54 states not only the recipient, “the chief musician,” but also the stringed instrument, “Neginoth,” that was to accompany the psalm. Psalm 54 was a reflection on the sorrow and disappointment David suffered when the Ziphites, men of the tribe of Judah, betrayed him to Saul, and said to the king, “Doth not David hide himself with us?” (1 Samuel 26)

Psalm 54 is a fitting conclusion to today’s devotional, for it closes with David declaring, 4Behold [Look, and see], God is mine helper7For he hath delivered me out of all trouble: And mine eye hath seen his desire upon mine enemies” (54:4, 7).

If you are in the throes of a conflict with someone who has no desire for peace, turn to the LORD. Yes, life is not fair, but you can be assured that God is just. Don’t fall into a “pity trap,” and despair. Call on the LORD, for He is waiting to help, and He is always good, and just.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Faltering Faith (1 Samuel 27)

Scripture reading – 1 Samuel 27

Saul had spoken words of affirmation to David, saying, “Blessed be thou, my son David: thou shalt both do great things, and also shalt still prevail” (26:25). Yet, David knew the unrelenting, evil character of the king, and had “said in his heart, I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul” (27:1). Fearing for his life, he determined to quickly “escape into the land of the Philistines,” for he believed the king would not desist until he was dead (27:1).

With his wives, and six hundred men, David retreated to the territory of Achish, the Philistine king of Gath (27:2-4), and when Saul learned he was departed from Israel, “he sought no more again for him” (27:4).

David appealed to his old foe, and King Achish gave him, his men, and their families sanctuary in Gath (the home of the slain giant Goliath). Desiring to remove himself from the king’s royal city, David requested a city where he and his families could dwell, and was given Ziklag, a city in southern Judah (27:5-6).

David dwelled among the Philistines for sixteen months (27:7), and acquired possessions, by invading and raiding the lands and cities of Israel’s enemies, “the Geshurites, and the Gezrites, and the Amalekites” (27:8). He made sure there were no survivors of the raids, and deceived the Philistine king, who believed he was raiding Israel (27:10-11). “And Achish believed David, saying, He hath made his people Israel utterly to abhor him;therefore he shall be my servant for ever” (27:12).

Closing thoughts:

I can find no leading of the LORD in David’s decision to depart from Israel, and settle in the Philistine territories. David made that decision when he despaired of life. While he escaped Saul, his immediate enemy, he put himself, his men, and their families in the midst of the Philistines, another enemy. I also cannot offer a defense for David’s decision to lie, and deceive King Achish, other than he had fallen into a state where his fears were greater than his faith. Solomon, David’s son and heir, would write, “25The fear of man bringeth a snare: But whoso putteth his trust in the Lord shall be safe” (Proverbs 29:25).

Trials and temptations present us with two choices: We can walk through life, living by our wits, and often driven by fear; or we can look at trials through the eyes of faith, and trust, and obey the LORD.

What is your guide?

Proverbs 3:5–65Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; And lean not unto thine own understanding. 6In all thy ways acknowledge him, And he shall direct thy paths.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Integrity is a Rare Virtue (1 Samuel 26)

Scripture reading – 1 Samuel 26

1 Samuel 26 presented David with a second opportunity to kill his enemy, and in spite of the appeal of his servant to take King’s Saul’s life, he refused, reasoning it would be a serious sin if he stretched “forth his hand against the LORD’S anointed” (26:9-24).

The Occasion (26:1-19)

David had come to Judah to seek safety among his kinsman; however, for a second time, the Ziphites, a family of the tribe of Judah, betrayed his hiding place to Saul (26:1). Whether out of fearing Saul, or seeking his favor, the treachery of one’s own was especially egregious. Saul, breaking his covenant with David (24:17-22), mobilized three thousand soldiers to pursue and kill David (26:2-5).  When David confirmed Saul’s encampment, he sought for a companion who would accompany him to the camp of his enemy (26:4-6).

While the king slept, David and Abishai slipped in and out of the king’s encampment, taking away Saul’s spear and his cruse of water (26:12). Ascending to a hill overlooking Israel’s encampment, David cried out, and awakening the army, taunted Abner, the king’s general, for his failure to protect Saul from harm (26:13-16).

Recognizing David’s voice, Saul disingenuously asked, “Is this thy voice, my son David?” (26:17)

Though he was his enemy, David honored the king, saying, “It is my voice, my lord, O king” (26:17). Rather than accuse the king, David asked, “Wherefore doth my lord thus pursue after his servant? for what have I done? or what evil is in mine hand?” (26:17-18) Appealing to the king’s spirit, David challenged the evil reports of other men, who had turned the heart of the king against him (26:19).

Saul’s Confession (26:21-25)

Saul confessed, he had “played the fool, and [had] erred exceedingly” (26:21). David then presented Saul’s spear, and proved he could have taken the king’s life (26:22), but had instead determined he “would not stretch forth [his] hand against the Lord’s anointed” (26:23). David had demonstrated integrity toward the king, and Saul acknowledged his testimony saying, “Blessed be thou, my son David: thou shalt both do great things, and also shalt still prevail” (26:25).

Though he had opportunity to kill his enemy, David had chosen to appeal to the king (26:18), and with humility requested,  “Let not my blood fall to the earth before the face of the Lord: for the king of Israel is come out to seek a flea, as when one doth hunt a partridge in the mountains” (26:20). The two men parted, and “David went on his way, and Saul returned to his place” (26:25).

Integrity is a rare virtue in our day, and there are few men whose lives are guided by immutable principles. David was such a man, and he was in the LORD’s words, “a man after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14). He was not a perfect man (as we will see in 1 Samuel 27); however, He loved the LORD. From His youth, he was an honorable son, a loyal friend, and a faithful servant.

Heroic in his deeds, humble in his walk, David was a man of integrity.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Loneliness: No Man Cared for My Soul (Psalm 142)

Scripture reading – Psalm 142

At what time David penned Psalm 142 is uncertain; however, the title of the psalm gives us an occasion: “Maschil of David; A Prayer when he was in the cave.” Our study in 1 Samuel placed David in a cave on two occasions. When he first grasped Saul’s intent to kill him, he sought refuge in the cave of Adullam (1 Samuel 22:1), where he was joined by his family. Later, when he retreated to “the wilderness of Engedi” (1 Samuel 24:1), David and six hundred men, hid in a cave overlooking Saul’s encampment (24:2-4). Providentially, it was the same cavern where Saul retreated for privacy (24:2-4).

Before we consider 1 Samuel 25, I invite you to read Psalm 142, for I believe it reflects David’s state of heart when he received the news that the prophet Samuel had died (25:1).

Perhaps it was the loss of that spiritual leader, the man who had anointed him to succeed Saul as king (1 Samuel 13:14, 16:11-13), that moved David to express in Psalm 142:4, 4I looked [beheld; gazed intently] on my right hand, and beheld, But there was no man that would know me [no one took notice]: Refuge failed me; No man cared [sought for; inquired after] for my soul.”

Someone reading today’s devotional might reflect that sentiment, for we are social creatures by nature, and loneliness is a haunt of us all at some point in life. Before God created Eve, He observed in Adam, “It is not good that the man should be alone” (Genesis 2:18). Trying circumstances can leave us feeling lonely, and abandoned. Disappointments, failure, sickness, or the death of a loved one intensifies a sense of isolation, and a feeling no one cares.

Where do you turn, when you struggle with thoughts, and feelings of abandonment?

David models the answer to that question, writing: “1I cried unto the Lord with my voice; With my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication. 2I poured out my complaint before him; I shewed before him my trouble” (142:1-2).

David attested, “I cried [out loud]…I [made] my supplication [I asked for His favor, and mercy]. I poured out my complaint [telling the LORD all his anxieties]” (141:1-2), and “I shew before him my trouble” (141:2b). The LORD knew David’s troubles, but it was freeing for him to acknowledge, and state them specifically in his prayer. He confessed, “my spirit was overwhelmed within me,” and admitted he did not see a way forward (141:3a). Though it did not lift the cloud that shadowed him, David took comfort knowing the LORD realized the hard place where he found himself (141:3b).

In his despair, David looked, and hoped there was someone who might come to encourage him (141:4), but he found no man to offer strength, or comfort (141:4). Tragically, he felt there were none who seemed to care, or take notice of his despair (141:4b).

Having exhausted every hope of comfort or rescue, David cried to the LORD, and said, “Thou [the LORD] art my refuge [shelter] and my portion [share] in the land of the living” (142:5). He had come to realize there was no one who could rescue him. No one who could save him from “persecutors” that were stronger than he (142:6).

With boldness of faith, and believing the LORD would hear and answer his prayer, David petitioned, “Bring my soul out of prison” (142:7a), the spiritually gloomy place he found himself. Renewing his trust in God, he promised to use his deliverance as an occasion to praise the LORD’S name, and to declare His goodness to the righteous (142:7).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith