Category Archives: Devotional

“He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord.” (2 Corinthians 10-13)

Scripture reading – 2 Corinthians 10-13

We come to the conclusion of 2 Corinthians and Paul mounts a defense of his ministry and authority as an apostle and minister of Jesus Christ. Today’s devotion will focus on 2 Corinthians 10.

The powerful tone of Paul’s first epistle to Corinth is at issue, and Paul minces no words in asserting a forthright answer to his enemies. We might find it distressing, as well as, disturbing that this great apostle and preacher of the early church would find it necessary to defend his calling and manner of ministry among believers. However, such has been the case with God’s people from the beginning. There is, and has always been, false teachers and fake believers in the midst of the assembly.

Paul answered several slanders against him in 2 Corinthians 10.

There were some who accused him of writing letters that were “weighty and powerful,” but his physical appearance was “weak, and his speech contemptible” (10:10). In other words, his enemies cast dispersions on his small stature, and criticized his preaching for being less than compelling. In Acts 20:9, a man named Eutychus fell asleep when “Paul was long preaching…and was taken up dead.”  (I may have had some fall asleep while I was preaching, but no one has fallen asleep and died!)

Paul’s desire was to be a shepherd with the “meekness and gentleness of Christ” (10:1); however, he assured his adversaries, he was more than capable and willing to address them as bold in person as he had in his letter (10:11).

Nevertheless, the apostle had no interest in comparing himself with others (10:12), and he refused to boast or magnify his accomplishments beyond that with which God had blessed him (10:13). While false teachers faked their credentials, and took credit for the accomplishments of others (10:14-15), Paul’s passion was to preach the Gospel where no man had gone (10:16-17). His overriding desire was to glory, not in himself, but that his life and ministry would be to the glory of God (10:17-18).

There is no calling or office higher than that of serving Jesus Christ. Don’t give in to the temptation of falsifying your resume, faking your accomplishments, and pursuing men’s applause.

Serve the LORD faithfully, and with a passion that one day you may be commended before Him. (10:18).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Love that gives, and forgives. (2 Corinthians 1-4)

Scripture reading – 2 Corinthians 1-4

Today’s Scripture reading (2 Corinthians 1-4) is Paul’s second letter to believers living in Corinth, the capital city of Achaia. While his first epistle had contained loving admonitions due to that church’s failure to deal with sin in its midst, his second letter manifested the joy, and loving compassion of a faithful pastor and apostle of Jesus Christ.

A Brief Review of 1 Corinthians

Before we consider 2 Corinthians, let’s remember the dire spiritual straits that motivated Paul to write 1 Corinthians. Rather than a spirit of love and humility that should have characterized the believers (1 Corinthians 1:10), Paul had learned the assembly in Corinth had become divided over personalities. Some had boasted and identified with Paul, some with Apollos, and others with Peter (1 Corinthians 1:12-13; 3:4-6, 22). Paul had rebuked their petty rifts and declared, “we preach Christ crucified” (1 Corinthians 1:23), and reminded them, “ye are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1 Corinthians 3:23).

Paul had longed to go to Corinth himself; however, he knew there were adversaries waiting there and, rather than risk a public confrontation that might have further divided the believers, he instead sent a stern letter by Timothy (1 Corinthians 3:14-21).

Adding to Paul’s displeasure was the knowledge that the church had allowed gross immortality in its midst (1 Corinthians 5:1). Rather than the sorrow and shame that should have moved them to put the sin and the sinner out of their midst, the people were proud and “puffed up” (1 Corinthians 5:1-2). Paul had demanded, “put away from among yourselves that wicked person” (1 Corinthians 5:13).

2 Corinthians

Paul’s second epistle is one of joy and relief. The Corinthian believers had received the admonitions in his first epistle, humbled themselves, and repented for their sins. The apostle made no secret that he had suffered much for the cause of Christ and the Gospel (2 Corinthians 1:5), but he prayed his sufferings and persecutions would be a cause for encouragement to them (1:6).

The apostle rejoiced that the believers had addressed the immorality in their midst, and their loving disciplines of the man had turned him to sorrow and repentance (2:5-6). Paul exhorted the believers to forgive the man and restore him, lest he “be swallowed up with overmuch sorrow” (2:7). Indeed, he goes so far as to encourage the saints to “confirm [their] love toward him” (2:8). With the love of a shepherd, Paul assured the church, “To whom ye forgive any thing, I forgive also: for if I forgave any thing, to whom I forgave it, for your sakes forgave I it in the person of Christ” (2:10).

What a great reminder of Biblical, Christlike love. Love that gives, and forgives.

Ephesians 4:3232 And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

What If There was No Resurrection? (1 Corinthians 15-16)

Scripture reading – 1 Corinthians 15-16

The focus of today’s Scripture reading moves from Spiritual Gifts, their distribution, uses, and abuses in the church (1 Corinthians 12-14), to the central doctrine of Christianity which is, the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead (1 Corinthians 15). Paul’s exposition of the Gospel, which is the death, burial, and resurrection of Christ (15:1-4), makes 1 Corinthians 15 one of the greatest and most pivotal chapters in the New Testament.

Consider the heart of the Gospel (15:3-4)

1) “Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures” (15:3; Isaiah 53:5-7).

2) “He was buried” (15:4a), thus leaving us no doubt that Jesus was dead, and his body was lifeless when it was removed from the cross.

3) “He rose again the third day according to the scriptures” (15:4b; Psalm 16:10; Matthew 12:40).

Eyewitnesses validated Christ’s resurrection from the dead (15:5-9).

Numbered among the eyewitnesses was “Cephas” (the apostle Peter), and “the twelve” disciples, less the traitor Judas (15:5). Jesus was also “seen of above five hundred brethren at once,” and as Paul penned the letter the majority of those witnesses were still alive (15:6). One named James was a witness of Jesus’ resurrection, and most scholars believe he was the half-brother of Jesus (15:7a), who was the head of the church in Jerusalem (15:13-21). Other witnesses were men identified as apostles (15:7b). The number of apostles is not given; however, there were seventy whom Jesus had sent out in Luke 10:1, 17.

Paul, who had been temporarily blinded by the LORD’s heavenly glory on the road to Damascus, numbered himself among the eyewitnesses of Jesus’ resurrection (Acts 9:1; 2 Corinthians 12:1), writing, “last of all he was seen of me also, as of one born out of due time” (15:8).

The fact of the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is not only the central doctrine of Christianity, it is also the motivation for boldly, and unapologetically declaring the Gospel of Jesus Christ (15:10-19).

Preaching a Savior who was sacrificed on the Cross, but did not rise from the dead, would be a hollow, lifeless, hopeless message. There is no Gospel, no good news, no hope of salvation, forgiveness of sins, and eternal life if Christ is not raised from the dead. I close with Paul’s assurance,

1 Corinthians 15:20–2220 But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits [the first of many who will be raised from the dead] of them that slept [who died in faith, believing]. 21 For since by man [Adam, the first man] came death, by man [Jesus Christ, the Second Adam] came also the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

We are the sons and daughters of Adam, and were born with a sinful nature, and under the curse and penalty of sin (15:22a; Romans 6:23a). When we confess our sin, and believe that Christ paid the penalty of our sin by His substitutionary death on the cross, we are promised we “shall all be made alive” (15:22b). To be “made alive,” is to be revived in our spirit (i.e. our inner man), and promised one day our bodies will be raised from the dead to life.

How can this be?

Romans 5:1919 For as by one man’s [Adam’s] disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one [Jesus Christ] shall many be made righteous. [Christ’s righteousness imparted to us by faith]

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

You Are One of a Kind; Embrace the Difference! (1 Corinthians 12-14)

Scripture reading – 1 Corinthians 12-14

Today’s Scripture reading speaks to several important doctrinal issues; however, the overriding subject is Spiritual Gifts.

1 Corinthians 12 draws a portrait of the early church and its diversity. Not only was there a variety of spiritual gifts present (12:4-10), but there was also a multi-cultural membership that included Jews and Gentiles, slaves and free (12:13). Realizing differences can breed the potential of misunderstandings, Paul reminded believers that God has sovereignly “set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him” (12:18) that He might bring unity and oneness.

To enjoy peace and unity, and to function as God intended, it was important for believers to value each other in their place. To illustrate that truth, Paul gave an extended visual using the physical body and its various members (hand and foot, ear and eye). He observed that there is a symbiotic relationship between members, whose function is dramatically different, yet in their place they work in harmony for the furtherance of the body as a whole (12:14-21).

Paul observed, there are “many members, yet but one body. 21 And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you. 22 Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble [weak], are necessary (12:20–22).

Lest jealousy or division arise among the people, Paul made the observation that every member, attractive or unattractive, strong or weak, had a place and should be valued for their individual role and function (12:23-24). Each member has a necessary place in the body of Christ, for “God hath tempered the body together” (12:24).

All members of God’s family should have a loving bond with other members, and evidence a sympathetic concern for others (12:25). When “one member suffer[s], all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it” (12:26).

Let’s face it, we are different! We can allow our differences to divide us, or we can choose to love and appreciate one another as individual members of “the body of Christ, and members in particular;” meaning valuing every member for their place and function in God’s perfect plan (12:27).

I close inviting you to consider: Are you functioning as a faithful member in the “body of Christ?”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Hillsdale Baptist Church Invitation (and additional COVID-19 Guidelines)

Good morning!

I trust you are planning on joining Hillsdale for our morning services. Pastor Brian Barber will be continuing his series in the 9:15 AM Adult Bible Fellowship Hour and broadcasting live from our auditorium on Hillsdale’s Facebook Page and http://www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.

I am looking forward to continuing my series on “The Model Prayer” in the 10:30 AM service as we continue our study in the Gospel of Luke. You are invited to follow the message with the attached Student Outline.02 – The Model Prayer (part 2) – Nov 29, 2020 AM student blank

Finally, knowing many of our Church family have traveled over the holidays, we are putting in place additional COVID-19 Guidelines for the next two Sundays.

Knowing the unintentional danger of exposing others to Coronavirus, we are requesting you to observe the following precautions:

1) Please sit together as family units this Sunday, and the following week. Children and teens are asked to sit with their parents during the morning service.

2) Please observe “social distancing” in the building for the next two-weeks, especially in the           restrooms, lobby, and auditorium.

3) Please limit fellowship in the Lobby for the next two Sundays, including greetings (shaking hands, hugs, etc.).

God has wonderfully blessed and protected our church and school families during COVID-19, and we want to do our part to continue enjoying good health. We love you, and the precautions are not made lightly; however, out of an abundance of caution, we feel they are necessary until we are sure that our families are safe after recent travels.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Salvation and Testimony of Sosthenes (1 Corinthians 1-4)

Scripture reading – 1 Corinthians 1-4

Our chronological reading of God’s Word brings us today to Paul’s first letter to the saints in Corinth. In the preceding devotional (Acts 18), you were introduced to the city of Corinth, the capital of Achaia, a Roman province. Corinth was a seaport city on the Mediterranean Sea, and by Paul’s day had eclipsed ancient Athens in commerce, culture, and wickedness.

Paul’s eighteen month-long ministry in Corinth had been fruitful (Acts 18:11), and many Jews and Gentiles had come to believe and accept Christ as Savior. Nevertheless, there was a great opposition to the Gospel, so that Paul had rebuked the Jews saying, “Your blood be upon your own heads; I am clean: from henceforth I will go unto the Gentiles” (Acts 18:6). Paul had soon after departed from Corinth.

1 Corinthians 1-4 – An encouraging letter, to a struggling church.

The members of the church in Corinth were far from perfect. Remembering the moral wickedness of that culture, the presence of idolatry, and the universal depravity of man, we understand the spiritual stress on the church from within and without. Not one to shy from his role as an apostle and preacher, Paul’s first letter to the believers in Corinth passionately addressed several issues: 1) The moral failures of believers in the body; 2) A contentious, divisive spirit; 3) Various questions regarding a believer’s liberty (for instance, eating meat offered to idols), marriage and divorce, spiritual gifts, and the resurrection.

I encourage you to read today’s Scripture; however, the balance of today’s devotional will focus on one verse, 1 Corinthians 1:1.

1 Corinthians 1:1 – “Paul, called to be an apostle of Jesus Christ through the will of God, and Sosthenes our brother.”

Who was Sosthenes, and why is the mention of his name noteworthy? To answer that question, we must return to Acts 18:9-17 where he is first mentioned, not as a friend, but as an adversary of Paul (Acts 18:17).

Remember how the Hellenistic Jews in Corinth (being of Greek origin), had been stirred and “made insurrection with one accord against Paul (Acts 18:12). They “brought [Paul] to the judgment seat” where Gallio, the deputy and Roman procurator of Achaia sat in judgment. Gallio, demonstrating his prejudiced toward the Jews, had no tolerance for their religious squabble with Paul (Acts 18:13-15). Humiliated by their dismissal (Acts 18:16), the Greek-Jews turned on Sosthenes, the leader of their insurrection. We read,

Acts 18:17 – “17 Then all the Greeks took Sosthenes, the chief ruler of the synagogue, and beat him before the judgment seat. And Gallio cared for none of those things.”

It was this same Sosthenes, the leader of the insurrection, who later became a believer and follower of Christ. His salvation had so transformed his life that he became a peer of Paul in the Gospel ministry!

Paul opens his first letter to the church in Corinth with not only a greeting, but with “Sosthenes our brother” (1 Corinthians 1:1). What a wonderful testimony of spiritual transformation! God’s Holy Spirit had so worked in Sosthenes’ life that he became not only Paul’s spiritual brother, but also his fellow-laborer!

Friend, have you known the transformation of a new spiritual nature that begins with sincere salvation?

2 Corinthians 5:17 – “17 Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Happy Thanksgiving from the Heart of a Shepherd!

Dear Heart of a Shepherd readers,

Today is Thanksgiving Day in the United States, and I have so much for which to be thankful.

I am thankful for my salvation, and for the LORD calling me to spend my life serving Him. I am thankful for the Word of God, and for the privilege I have had to preach and teach His unchanging Word for 41 years. I am thankful to have the privilege to study, write down my meditations in the Word, and then share them with hundreds who follow them everyday on http://www.HeartofAShepherd.com.

I am thankful for my family, and dear friends who have encouraged me through trials. I am thankful to Hillsdale’s church and school staff who have served faithfully through a difficult year. I am thankful to the faithful members of Hillsdale Baptist Church; you have been a part of my life and ministry for over 35 years.

God bless you dear friends, for our God is indeed faithful and we should praise and thank Him!

https://www.jacquielawson.com/ecard/pickup/rf8db77bc29404c298a3b8691bf3ec4d2?source=jl999&utm_medium=pickup&utm_source=share&utm_campaign=receiver

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

No Cause for Fear, When You are In the Center of God’s Will (Acts 18-19)

Scripture reading – Acts 18-19

We find ourselves nearing the end of Paul’s second missionary journey, this time with Silas (15:40), and later Timotheus (16:1; 17:14), as his travel companions. Paul’s ministry in Athens had been a fruitful one, and he had with unapologetic boldness declared to the Jews and Greeks that Jesus Christ was LORD, whom God had raised from the dead (17:31).

Acts 18 – Paul’s Ministry in Corinth

Departing from Athens, Paul traveled alone to the city of Corinth some 40-50 miles west of Athens. Corinth was the capital of Achaia, a Roman province on the Mediterranean Sea, and was renowned for its commerce, culture, scholarship, and its wickedness.

In Corinth, Paul was employed by “a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla” (18:2). This couple had been exiled from Rome by the decree of Claudius, the fifth Roman emperor, who around 49 A.D., commanded that all Jews were “to depart from Rome” (18:2). Providentially, God led Paul to the home of Aquila and Priscilla who were like himself, tentmakers, and there he resided while ministering in Corinth (18:3).

As was Paul’s custom, he began preaching “in the synagogue every Sabbath, and persuaded [convinced] the Jews and the Greeks (most likely Hellenistic Jews)” (18:4). Silas and Timotheus’s arrival in Corinth (18:5) stimulated Paul to boldly and earnestly testify “to the Jews that Jesus was Christ [the Messiah]” (18:5).

The Jews’ strong rejection of the Gospel, and Paul’s rebuke of them is described in the following verse:

Acts 18:66  And when they [the Jews] opposed themselves [resisted; i.e. raised up in opposition to], and blasphemed [railed; reviled; slandered], he shook [to shake violently] his raiment [robe; i.e. indicating exasperation], and said unto them, Your blood be upon your own heads [i.e. a  disclaimer; Paul was not responsible for their souls]; I am clean: from henceforth I will go unto the Gentiles.”

Literally and figuratively shaking his robe (18:6), Paul continued his ministry in the home of a man “named Justus, one that worshipped God, whose house joined hard [bordered on; beside] to the synagogue” (18:7). No doubt Paul’s proximity to the synagogue infuriated his enemies. Adding to the offense was the news that “Crispus, the chief ruler of the synagogue, believed [commitment of faith] on the Lord with all his house; and many of the Corinthians hearing believed, and were baptized” (18:8).

In spite of the opposition and threats he faced, after the LORD assured him “in the night by a vision, Be not afraid, but speak, and hold not thy peace: 10  For I am with thee, and no man shall set on thee to hurt thee: for I have much people in this city” (18:9-10), Paul continued “teaching the word of God” among the citizens of Corinth another eighteen months (18:11),

Believer, it is comforting to know that even a man like Paul needed assurance that the LORD was with him.

Lesson – There is no greater place of safety, or comfort, than in the center of God’s will.

Isaiah 41:1010 Fear thou not; for I am with thee: be not dismayed; for I am thy God: I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Spiritual Virtues: Faith, Love, and Hope (1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians)

Scripture reading – 1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians

We continue our chronological reading schedule today originating from two epistles authored by the apostle Paul to believers in Thessalonica. For perspective, I invite you to recall our study in Acts 17. Paul had arrived in Thessalonica, the capital city of ancient Macedonia, and for three Sabbaths he boldly preached the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the synagogue of that city, “alleging, that Christ must needs have suffered, and risen again from the dead” (Acts 17:3), and that according to the Scriptures (Isaiah 53).

Some in Thessalonica had believed, including a great number of Gentiles: “The devout Greeks a great multitude, and of the chief women not a few” (Acts 17:4). The success of Paul’s ministry in that city had provoked unbelieving Jews to envy, and they stirred up a mob against them, forcing Paul and Silas to flee the city (17:10).

With that introduction, we come to today’s Scripture readings, 1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians.

As you read the epistles, notice what I believe is “a shepherd’s heart,” and longing for the saints of God. For instance, consider the salutations in both letters, and notice how they effuse a pastor’s sincere love and longing.

Paul writes in his first epistle, “1bGrace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.We give thanks to God always for you all, making mention of you in our prayers” (1 Thessalonians 1:1b–2).

Paul beings his second epistle with a greeting that is similar to the first epistle: “Grace unto you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. We are bound to thank God always for you” (2 Thessalonians 1:2–3).

Notice the themes: Grace, God’s loving favor that He gives and cannot be merited, and Peace, like grace, a gift that comes from God, through Jesus Christ. Such peace and harmony come from the believer’s security in God’s love (John 14:27; Romans 5:1; Colossians 1:20).

Having greeted the saints with a longing and desire that they would rest in the blessings of God’s grace and peace, Paul erupted into prayers of thanksgiving! Paul wrote, “We give thanks to God always for you all” (1 Thessalonians 1:2). In his second epistle he wrote, “We are bound to thank God always for you” (2 Thessalonians 1:2-3).

When Paul remembered the saints of Thessalonica, his fond remembrances stirred his heart to rejoice and give thanks to the LORD. Those believers were not without their faults; however, they manifested three spiritual virtues that should inspire all believers: Faith, Love, and Hope (1 Thessalonians 1:3). Paul writes,

1 Thessalonians 1:3 – “Remembering without ceasing your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ, in the sight of God and our Father.”

Their faith was more than a profession, it was a working faith (1 Thessalonians 1:3a). Believers in Thessalonica demonstrated their faith by their works (James 2:18-22, 26).

The second virtue was their “labor of love” (1 Thessalonians 1:3b). Love is an enduring motivation for ministering to others (Galatians 6:10; 1 Peter 1:22), and a sincere love for God will be demonstrated in a readiness to love and serve others (2 Corinthians 5:14-15; Hebrews 10:24).

Patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thessalonians 1:3c) was the third virtue of believers in Thessalonica. Literally, a longsuffering, enduring, steadfast hope in Christ.

What motivates a believer to work, labor, and not lose hope? The promise of Christ’s coming!

Titus 2:13b – “…Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Hello, Athens! (Acts 17)

Scripture reading – Acts 17

Today’s Scripture reading follows Paul’s ministry in Philippi, and what some might describe as a “hullabaloo” (i.e. uproar, tumult, clamor) that was created after he and Silas were falsely accused of teaching “customs, which are not lawful for us to receive, neither to observe, being Romans” (16:21). Those men were thereafter beaten and jailed (16:22-24). The next day they were set free and departed from Philippi (16:39-40), traveling “through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica” (17:1).

Acts 17 – Paul and Silas’ ministry in three prominent cities of the first century: Thessalonica (17:1-13), Berea (17:10-14), and Athens (17:15-34).

Notice that it was Paul’s custom to go into a city, and on the Sabbath enter into a synagogue, and boldly declare Jesus as the Messiah (i.e. the Anointed One) and Savior (17:1-3). Time and space prevent me from an in-depth study of Paul’s ministry in those cities; however, I trust my amplification of some key verses will be a blessing.

The city of Thessalonica (Acts 17:1-13)

Acts 17:1-3Now when they [Paul and Silas] had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where was a synagogue of the Jews: 2 And Paul, as his manner was [i.e. as was his custom or habit], went in unto them [the Jews in the synagogue at Thessalonica], and three sabbath days reasoned [disputed; preached; conversed] with them out of  [from] the scriptures [i.e. The Old Testament Scriptures], 3  Opening [explaining; setting forth] and alleging [setting forth], that Christ must needs [ought; should] have suffered [experienced pain], and risen again from the dead; and that this Jesus, whom I preach [declare; proclaim] unto you, is Christ [the Messiah].

The response of some was to believe; however, the response of many was to reject Jesus Christ and oppose witnesses.

Acts 17:5-7But the Jews which believed not, moved with envy [jealous over Paul’s success], took unto them certain lewd [evil; wicked] fellows of the baser sort [vulgar; good for nothing], and gathered a company [crowd], and set all the city on an uproar [tumult; disturbance], and assaulted [rushing at] the house of Jason [a man who was a Christian], and sought to bring them [Paul and Silas] out to the people [for the purpose of publicly accusing and attacking]. 6 And when they found them not, they drew Jason and certain brethren unto the rulers of the city, crying, These that have turned [made an uproar] the world upside down [made an uproar] are come hither also; 7Whom Jason hath received: and these all do contrary [oppose; against] to the decrees [laws; ordinances] of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus.

The city of Berea (Acts 17:10-14)

Acts 17:11 – These [the people of Berea] were more noble [i.e. noble minded] than those in Thessalonica, in that they received [accepted] the word with all readiness of mind [eagerly; joyfully], and searched [examined; investigated] the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

The city of Athens (Acts 17:15-34)

Known for both its scholarship and idolatry, Paul journeyed to Athens and seeing the idols of that ancient city in every place, he boldly declared Jesus Christ in both the synagogue and public places.

Acts 17:16-17 Now while Paul waited for them at Athens, his spirit [soul; inward man] was stirred [provoked] in him, when he saw the city wholly given to idolatry [i.e. was full of idols]. 17  Therefore disputed he [reasoned; preached; teach public twin ] in the synagogue with the Jews, and with the devout persons [religious; reverent], and in the market [i.e. The town square; public thoroughfare] daily with them that met with him [that he chance to meet].

Acts 17:20-22For thou bringest certain strange things [surprising; shocking] to our ears: we would know [understand; desire to know] therefore what these things mean. 21  (For all the Athenians and strangers which were there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.) 22 Then Paul stood [standing] in the midst [center; lit. he seized the opportunity] of Mars’ hill [a hill in Athens; a meeting  place], and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things [everything] ye are too superstitious [religious ;i.e. fearing the gods of idols ].

Acts 17:29-31Forasmuch then as we are the offspring [family; people] of God, we ought not to think [suppose; regard] that the Godhead is like [similar; i.e. the nature of God] unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven [scratch; etched; sculpted] by art and man’s device [thought or imagination].30 And the times of this ignorance God winked at [overlooked;  do not punish]; but now commandeth [ declares] all men every where to repent [change of mind accompanied by sorrow]: 31  Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge [condemn] the worldin righteousness [justice] by that man whom he hath ordained [i.e. Jesus Christ]; whereof he [God] hath given assurance unto all men, in that he [God] hath raised him [Jesus Christ] from the dead.

We might imagine the shock to the pride and feelings of those men of Athens who, in the words of the Scripture, did nothing more than want to “tell, or to hear some new thing” (17:21). Here was a man who boldly declared what they knew in their hearts, that the God of creation and heaven (17:29a) is nothing like the idols they had sculpted with their own hands and imaginations (17:29b). Paul warned, God would no longer overlook their willful ignorance, and was commanding “all men every where to repent” (17:30).

Like in our own day, many mocked and rejected the Gospel (17:32a), some desired to hear more (17:32b), and there were some who believed (17:34).

What about you? What do you believe? Is your heart ready for God’s judgment? (2 Corinthians 5:10)

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith