Category Archives: Education

Only a Nation of Fools Eradicates Its History (Numbers 36; Deuteronomy 1)

Scripture reading – Numbers 36; Deuteronomy 1

Numbers 36 – Women’s Rights, and a Question of Inheritance

The Book of Numbers ended on an interesting note, as a concern regarding inheritance was raised once again. We considered in an earlier devotional the matter of a man’s inheritance, should he die without a son as heir (Numbers 27:7-11). A Hebrew man named Zelophehad had died without a son, and his five daughters had petitioned that they were their father’s heirs, and rightful heirs of his possession in the Promised Land (27:4-5). The LORD had directed Moses that Zelophehad’s daughters would be given their father’s inheritance (27:6-11).

Because the lands were assigned by tribes, and families, there was concern for what would become of tribal lands should a man’s heirs be his daughters (Numbers 36:1-4), and marry outside their tribe. It was contended that the lands would be lost to a tribe, should the daughters marry outside their tribe. The quandary was resolved, by the daughters being required to take a husband from their father’s tribe (36:5-9), thereby keeping the land within the tribe.

Numbers 36 concludes with the “daughters of Zelophehad,” submitting to the LORD’s will, and marrying men within their tribe. Thus, the land was secured for future generations of their tribal family (36:10-13).

An Introduction to the Book of Deuteronomy

Our chronological study of the Scriptures brings us to the Book of Deuteronomy, the fifth book, of the first five books of the Bible known as the Pentateuch. Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers chronicled Israel’s journey in the wilderness, and gave us a record of God’s Law and Commandments.

The Book of Deuteronomy begins at the conclusion of Israel’s wilderness wanderings, with that nation encamped at the threshold of the Promised Land. With the exception of Moses, Joshua, and Caleb, the generation that had departed Egypt, and were twenty years old and older at that time, was dead.

Deuteronomy 1 – The Final Words and Exhortation of Moses to Israel

Deuteronomy records the final words, and exhortations of a man that had shepherded Israel forty years.  We read: “And it came to pass in the fortieth year, in the eleventh month, on the first day of the month, that Moses spake unto the children of Israel, according unto all that the LORD had given him in commandment unto them” (1:3).

It was important for Moses to rehearse with that generation who they were, from whence they came, and God’s plan for the nation. Moses challenged the people, “8Behold, I have set the land before you: go in and possess the land which the Lord sware unto your fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to give unto them and to their seed after them” (Deuteronomy 1:8).

Much as a man might research his ancestral family tree to know the history of his lineage, Moses sought to pass to the new generation a knowledge of not only their physical ancestry, but more importantly, their spiritualheritage as God’s chosen people.

The balance of the first chapter of Deuteronomy served as a recap of Israel’s forty years in the wilderness, and the previous generation’s refusal to trust the LORD. For any who might question why the generation before them had perished in the wilderness, Moses reminded them as a nation:

Deuteronomy 1:32–3832Yet in this thing ye did not believe the Lord your God,
33Who went in the way before you, to search you out a place to pitch your tents in, in fire by night, to shew you by what way ye should go, and in a cloud by day.
34And the Lord heard the voice of your words, and was wroth, and sware, saying,
35Surely there shall not one of these men of this evil generation see that good land, which I sware to give unto your fathers,
36Save Caleb the son of Jephunneh; he shall see it, and to him will I give the land that he hath trodden upon, and to his children, because he hath wholly followed the Lord.
37Also the Lord was angry with me for your sakes, saying, Thou also shalt not go in thither.
38But Joshua the son of Nun, which standeth before thee, he shall go in thither: encourage him: for he shall cause Israel to inherit it.

History is important, and only a doomed society dare deny its history, and fail to learn from its past. Eradicating the history, and symbols of a nation might pacify a few, but it will invariably destine its people to repeat its failures.

In the words of the British statesman, Winston Churchill: “Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Employment Opportunity: Are You Ready to Start Over? An Interview with HCA Principal Mrs. Tanya Henry (3rd of 3 videos)

This video is a bold, unapologetic invitation to veteran Christian School teachers to consider relocating to Tampa Bay, and joining the experienced faculty of Hillsdale Christian Academy. We are growing, have earned a reputation for excellence, and have not lowered our standards to accommodate the culture. If you are tired of compromise, check out a school that still understands that love and disciplines are the key to education, and developing leaders of tomorrow.
Call us at 813-884-8250, ext. 235 to inquire, or email us at thenry@HCATampa.org.

Employment Opportunity: Are You Ready to Start Over? An Interview with Pastor Eric Peterman, School Administrator

Hillsdale Christian Academy (HCA) is growing, and we are seeking professional, degreed educators who have a heart for ministry, a love for children, and a passion for education.

This is the second video of an introductory series for HCA, and features my interview with school administrator, Pastor Eric Peterman.

HCA was established in 2005 with the expressed purpose of reaching Tampa Bay with the Gospel. HCA’s administrators, and experienced faculty have earned us a reputation in our community as a place that provides an outstanding education, in a nurturing, safe environment.

It is my prayer that this introductory video series will give some educators a vision for becoming a part of our growing Christian school. We are seeking qualified educators for both elementary and middle school grades. We are also adding an administrative assistant to our school staff.

For more information, or to apply, please contact our principal, Mrs. Tanya Henry, or our school administrator, Pastor Eric Peterman, by calling 813-884-8250, ext. 235. You can also email us at thenry@hcaTampa.org.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Travis D. Smith
Senior Pastor

Listen to the Sound of the Trumpet (Numbers 9-10)

Listen to the Sound of the Trumpet (Numbers 9-10)

Scripture reading – Numbers 9-10

Numbers 9 – The Passover Memorial

Numbers 9 marks the beginning of the second year that Israel was encamped at the base of Mount Sinai. It was “the first month of the second year after they were come out of the land of Egypt” (9:1). The LORD then commanded Moses to speak to “the children of Israel [to] keep the passover” (9:2).

The Passover had been instituted by the LORD to serve as a perpetual memorial of the night He spared the firstborn of Israel from death (Exodus 12:1-14). That night, the angel of death passed over the households where the blood of the Passover lamb was applied to the door posts (Exodus 12:21-30). The day after, the LORD liberated the children of Israel from slavery (Exodus 12:31-36).

We find an occasion where some men of Israel had been defiled by handling a dead body, and were ceremonially unclean, and unable to observe the Passover (9:6-10). The LORD, in an exercise of divine grace, provided those men an opportunity to observe the Passover the next month (9:11-14).

The LORD Commanded the Starts, and Stops for His People (9:15-22)

Having promised the Tabernacle would serve as a visual reminder of His presence in the midst of Israel, when the sanctuary was raised, the LORD in a “cloud [that] covered the tabernacle…and at even there was upon the tabernacle as it were the appearance of fire, until the morning. 16So it was alway: the cloud covered it by day, and the appearance of fire by night” (9:15-16).

Because the LORD was the Shepherd of Israel, the people journeyed as He led them through the wilderness. When “the cloud was taken up from the tabernacle” (9:17a), the people journeyed. When the cloud was stayed, and “the children of Israel pitched their tents” (9:17b). The LORD decreed the “starts and stops” of His people, and they followed the movements of the cloud and the pillar of fire throughout their journey (9:21-23).

Numbers 10 – Silver Trumpets Heralded the Movements of the Tribes of Israel

Israel was a theocracy, a nation whose government was under the Law of God, and was led by spiritual leaders. Aaron and his sons were tasked with the responsibility of sounding the trumpets (10:8), for the LORD had given the priests the responsibility of communicating His direction to the people.

The silver trumpets sounded four messages (10:3-10). There was a sound to assemble (10:3-4). There was a sound for journeying (10:5-6). Another sound for a call to arms (10:9). There was also a sound that heralded festivals, and sacrifices (10:10). Of necessity, the sounds of the trumpets had to be clear and distinct, for the people to understand the message (10:3-4, 7).

The departure from Mount Sinai was recorded in Numbers 10, and the nation of Israel set out on her journey for the Promised Land (10:11-13, 33-36). The leaders of the tribes are named (10:14-28); however, the cloud was a reminder of the Lord’s presence and protection. The God of Israel was the Commander and Chief of Israel.

A Closing Appeal

In his letter to Corinth, Paul warned believers that they should make certain that the teaching, and preaching they sit under is a message that leaves no uncertainty. Those who preach, and teach the Word of God should not be like a trumpet that gives an “uncertain sound” (1 Corinthians 14:8). Make sure the teaching you sit under is like the silver trumpets- the Word and the will of the LORD!

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Employment Opportunity: Ready to Start Over? Hillsdale Christian Academy Is Growing, and Needs You!

Employment Opportunity

With World War I looming on the horizon, the United States faced a need to recruit men willing to serve in the army. To help with the recruitment effort, an artist by the name of Montgomery Flagg, conceived a recruitment poster that featured an iconic patriotic figure known as Uncle Sam. With a ribbon of blue and white stars encircling his white top hat, and clothes boasting red, white, and blue, Uncle Sam was portrayed with an intense stare, and the words, “I Want YOU for the U.S. Army.”

I am not Uncle Sam; however, I am the pastor of Hillsdale Baptist Church, and I Want You, if you are an instructor who is a sincere believer, and looking for an opportunity to be a part of a ministry like Hillsdale Christian Academy (HCA).

Founded in 2005, HCA is a ministry outreach of Hillsdale Baptist Church, and is located in a beautiful, modern facility in north Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL. We have a reputation in our community as a traditional institution of the highest academic standards.

We are philosophically Bible-based, and devoted to a loving, nurturing environment, that pursues educational disciplines in the classroom.

With a Biblical world-view as our foundation, HCA is growing and we are hiring passionate, experienced instructors of our conviction – teachers who are willing to relocate to beautiful Tampa Bay, join Hillsdale Baptist Church and our team of Christian professionals, and grow with our ministry.

We are expanding our middle school, and want to fill elementary and middle school openings this fall. We are also looking to hire an administrative assistant for the school.

To inquire, or apply, please contact HCA’s Principal, Mrs. Tanya Henry, or administrator Pastor Eric Peterman, by calling 813-884-8250, ext. 235, or emailing thenry@hcatampa.org.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Travis D. Smith
Senior Pastor

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Elihu the Younger: An Exhibition of Youthful Zeal (Job 32)

Scripture reading – Job 32

Job 31 was Job’s final reply to his friends’ allegations, that his troubles were those with which God afflicts wicked men. When he had finished his retort, his friends remained silent, and they “ceased to answer Job, because he was righteous in his own eyes” (32:1).

Listening to the dispute between Job and his friends was a younger man named “Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite, of the kindred of Ram” (32:2b). Because he was young, he had wisely deferred to his elders; however, he had determined he would no longer sit in silence.

Exhibiting the zeal of youth, he confessed he had been stirred to indignation, not only by Job, whom he observed, “justified himself rather than God” (32:2c), but “also against his three friends…because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job” (32:3). When he realized the conversation between Job and his friends had ended with no resolution, Elihu determined he would be silent no longer (32:4-8).

Observing that, “9Great men are not always wise: Neither do the aged understand judgment” (32:9); he demanded that his elders would weigh his opinion in the matter of Job and his afflictions (32:10). Though his words were lofty, his spirit was negative (32:12), as he boasted he had insights that had not yet been expressed (32:14-17).

Elihu’s enthusiasm, and his demand to be heard by Job and the others, was graphically expressed in a metaphor where he likened his spirit to a new wine skin that was ready to burst (32:18-19).

Job 32:18–19 – “18For I am full of matter [words], The spirit within me constraineth [compels] me. 19Behold, my belly is as wine which hath no vent; It is ready to burst like new bottles.”

Unable to contain himself any longer, Elihu asserted:

Job 32:20–2220I will [must] speak, that I may be refreshed [relieved]: I will open my lips and answer.
21Let me not, I pray you, accept [show favor to] any man’s person, Neither let me give flattering titles unto man.
22For I know not to give flattering titles [puff up another]; In so doing my maker [Creator] would soon take me away [seize by force].

Though he was the younger of the four men, and one who had wisely deferred to his elders, Elihu nevertheless had a zeal that demanded to be heard. Though young, he was wise in much that he said, and his speech will cover six of the remaining chapters in our study of the Book of Job (Job 32-37).

A closing thought: Old age is not indicative that one has spiritual maturity or understanding; however, it is also true that religious zeal without wisdom can be injurious.

Proverbs 4:7 – “7Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: And with all thy getting get understanding.”

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Acquiring Wisdom Demands Hard Work and Sacrifice (Job 27-28)

Scripture reading – Job 27-28

Bildad had concluded his final address to Job, reminding him that, in the sight of Almighty God, a man can never be justified (25:4), for he is nothing more than a maggot (25:6). Job’s response to Bildad’s assertions comprised his longest speech, beginning with Job 26:1, and concluding with Job 31:40. We continue our examination of Job’s response, considering two chapters, Job 27-28.

Job 27 – Job’s Parable: His Wise Response to Bildad (27:1)

Job continued his speech, but this time directed his appeal to God and complained that he felt he had been dealt with harshly (27:1-2). He acknowledged God as his Creator, and realized that he was like Adam, a man in whom “the Spirit of God is” (27:3; Genesis 2:7).

Job’s friends had challenged him to confess his sins, but he asserted his innocence and declared, “4My lips shall not speak wickedness, Nor my tongue utter deceit [lies]. 5God forbid that I should justify you [affirm or agree with their false accusations]: Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me” (27:4-5).

Job would not compromise his integrity, to appease his lying friends. His character and testimony were more important to him than pacifying men who assailed him. He was determined to be an honest man, one who would not bear the sorrow of a guilty conscience (27:6).

Job confessed that the wicked are not always punished according to their sins, but the judgment of God is inevitable (27:11-23). For instance, the children of the wicked often suffer for the transgressions of their fathers. They are destined “for the sword” (they often die early, tragic deaths), and they are never “satisfied with bread” (never happy or content, 27:14). When the wicked die, they have so embittered their wives that, their “widows shall not weep” for them (27:15). The households of the wicked are unstable, for “he buildeth his house as a moth” (27:18).

When the wicked lie down in death, the honors heaped upon him in life are soon lost and forgotten (27:19); and the terror of death, and the wrath of God come upon him suddenly (27:20), and he will be shown no mercy (27:22).

Job 28 – Searching for Wisdom Compared to A Miner’s Labor

Job described the lengths that men go to in seeking wisdom, and he drew an analogy with men who work in mines digging for gold and silver (28:1), and refining stones for iron, brass, and copper (28:2).

The intense labor of the miner is described (28:3-11). He digs a shaft into the earth, and brings light in search of ore (“stones of darkness,” 28:3). As the ground and rocks of the earth are mined, they reveal “sapphires…dust of gold” (28:6). The miner lays his hand to the rocks, and overturns mountains in seeking rich ore (28:9). He cuts channels in the rock (“rivers among the rocks”), and prevents waters from flowing into the mine (28:10-11).

The search for wisdom is as intense as the miner’s search for precious metals and stones.

“Where shall Wisdom Be Found?” (28:12)

Wisdom, unlike “book learning,” is not something a man can acquire in a classroom, or by hiring others to labor for him. True wisdom, the wisdom that only God can impart to a man, is priceless (28:13a). One cannot mine wisdom out of the earth, or find it by exploring the depths of the sea (28:14). Wisdom cannot be purchased with gold or silver (28:15), and the purest gold is not to be compared to it (28:16-19).

If wisdom is so valuable, and rare, “Whence then cometh wisdom?” (28:20). Wisdom is “hid from the eyes” of man and “the fowls of the air” (28:21). You cannot find wisdom, though you seek it among the dead who have passed from this life (28:22).

God Alone is the Source of Wisdom (28:23-28)

23God understandeth the way thereof, And He knoweth the place thereof” (28:23). Man can only know wisdom by God’s revelation. God sees and knows all things, “24For he looketh to the ends of the earth, And seeth under the whole heaven” (28:24). God is Creator, and He knows the weight of the winds and the water, and regulates the rain and the “way for the lightning” (28:25-26).

Where Might a Man Acquire Wisdom? (28:28)

“The fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; And to depart from evil is understanding” (28:28).

The acquisition of wisdom begins with the fear and reverence of God (a fear of God and wisdom are inseparable).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

The End of the Commandment is Love (1 Timothy 1-6)

Scripture reading – 1 Timothy 1-6

Of all Paul’s epistles, his letter to 1 Timothy is my favorite.

When I was a young man, and aspiring to ministry, 1 Timothy was instructive in the manner of man God calls to serve as the pastor\shepherd of His people. As I began in those early years, I found Paul’s counsel to Timothy invaluable as I consciously framed each phase of my ministry philosophy after Paul’s example from youth pastor to senior pastor. Now that I am an elder pastor, I reflect on Paul’s manner and rapport with Timothy, and desire the same with those who serve with me.

We first met Timothy when he was a young believer, and privileged to be a part of Paul’s missions’ team. He was, according to Acts 16:1, “the son of a certain woman, which was a Jewess, and believed; but his father was a Greek.” The implication was that Timothy’s home was a spiritually divided home; his father was apparently a Gentile unbeliever, but his mother was a woman of Jewish heritage and a follower of Christ.

In spite of the divisive nature of his family, his mother and grandmother were godly women of faith and had a profound influence on Timothy. Paul wrote, “When I call to remembrance the unfeigned [sincere] faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also” (2 Timothy 1:5). Timothy’s passion for spiritual truth was inflamed from his early childhood. In his last epistle to Timothy, Paul reminded him of his spiritual privilege and godly heritage, writing, “And that from a child [very young child] thou hast known [growing knowledge of] the holy scriptures [instructed in the Old Testament Scriptures], which are able to make thee wise [understanding] unto salvation through faith [assurance; belief] which is in Christ Jesus” (2 Timothy 3:15).

While Paul mentored many, his relationship with Timothy was that of a spiritual father. His affection as Timothy’s spiritual mentor is evidenced throughout the letter in both affirmations and admonitions (1 Timothy 1:2, 18; 4:6-16; 6:11-13, 20-21). Timothy became a devoted companion on Paul’s missionary journeys (Acts 16:3), a co-worker in the churches, and finally the pastor of the church in Ephesus (1:3a).

Paul commissioned Timothy, and charged him to continue ministering in Ephesus after his departure by ship for Macedonia (1:3a). He was mindful of the need to encourage Timothy to be bold in his ministry (1:3b), and give no tolerance to false teachers and their heresies (1:4).

Time and space do not allow me to continue an exposition of this wonderful book, but I will take liberty to close with Paul’s charge and instruction to Timothy found in 1 Timothy 1:5.

1 Timothy 1:5 – “Now the end of the commandment [charge; mandate] is charity [“agape”; self-sacrificing love]out of a pure [unsoiled; free of sin] heart, and of a good [clear; morally honorable] conscience, and of faith unfeigned [sincere faith; without hypocrisy].”

Paul’s challenge to Timothy should be the aspiration of every believer. To have and to cultivate a loving heart, unspoiled by envy and strife; a moral conscience that is good, and honorable before God; and faith that is sincere, without hypocrisy.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Remember When Superman Symbolized Justice and “The American Way?”

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 16-18

Continuing our chronological daily reading of the Scriptures, you are invited to read Proverbs 16-18. Today’s devotional will be based on Proverbs 16:10-13.

Americans live in a republic whose laws should be as binding on her leaders as they are on common citizens.  Idealistically, no leader is above the law and the scales of justice are in no man’s favor.

In a monarchy, however, the king is the embodiment of the law and the citizens of his realm can only pray that their king is a righteous man who fears the judgment and wrath of God.

Proverbs 16:10-13 expresses four principles that serve as a guide for every leader and those he serves.

Proverbs 16:10 – “A divine sentence [decision reflecting God’s Law] is in [proceeds from; is on] the lips of the king: his mouth transgresseth not [does not commit trespass] in judgment [sentence; verdict].”

Kings, rulers, judges and all who are in authority are to exercise judgment being mindful that God, not man, is the ultimate authority of right and wrong.  When godly men sit in places of judgment, their hearts are able to weigh matters with the discernment God alone gives.  How is that possible?

Deuteronomy 17:18-20 – “And it shall be, when he [king] sitteth upon the throne of his kingdom, that he [king] shall write him a copy of this law in a book out of that which is before the priests the Levites: 19 And it shall be with him, and he shall read therein all the days of his life: that he may learn to fear the LORD his God, to keep all the words of this law and these statutes, to do them: 20 That his heart be not lifted up above his brethren, and that he turn not aside from the commandment, to the right hand, or to the left: to the end that he may prolong his days in his kingdom, he, and his children, in the midst of Israel.”

The kings of Israel were to possess a copy of God’s Law written in their own hand (17:18).  The Law of God was to be a king’s daily meditation (17:19) and he was to remember he was God’s servant and a minister to his people (17:20).

Proverbs 16:11 – “A just weight [right verdict; scale] and balance [scales] are the LORD’S: all the weights [stones; measurements] of the bag are His work [labor; work of His hands].”

Lady Justice continues to serve as an international symbol of equity. She is often depicted wearing a blindfold, holding in her left hand the scales of justice, and in her right the double-edged sword of judgment.  She serves as a modern reminder of what kings were to remember: God is the final judge and arbitrator.  Israel’s king was to remember that God’s Law and the immutable principles of His holiness, grace and mercy were the final word when he executed judgment.

Proverbs 16:12 – “It is an abomination [abhorrence; loathsome; repulsive] to kings to commit [do; execute] wickedness [moral wrong]: for the throne [seat of authority and judgment] is established [fixed; firmly established; made strong] by righteousness [rightness; moral virtue].”

Proverbs 16:12 addresses the responsibility and influence of kings and all who are in authority. I believe America is in a quagmire of immorality and injustice because our leaders have forsaken the Law of God, and have no moral compass for discerning right and wrong. The decay of our strength and security as a nation has paralleled the erosion of our confidence and respect for those in authority.

Proverbs 16:13 – “Righteous [true; just] lips are the delight [desire; pleasure] of kings; and they love [desire; like] him that speaketh right [just; upright].”

The integrity of a leader may be measured by the moral character of his counselors.  Godless leaders seek counsel from those who serve their immoral ends, but godly leaders have a passion for truth and love those whose words and counsel are honest and just.

Do you desire wisdom and discernment? Study God’s Word and meditate on His Laws and Commandments.

Psalm 119:103-105 – “How sweet are thy words unto my taste! yea, sweeter than honey to my mouth! 104  Through thy precepts I get understanding: therefore I hate every false way. 105 Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Conception, Birth, and Life of Samson (Judges 13-15)

Daily Reading Assignment – Judges 13-15

The story of Samson, the judge and champion of Israel (Judges 13-16), is a familiar one to the majority of Bible students. For that reason, I am focusing on the less known details of his conception and the revelation of his person to his mother and father (Judges 13).

The national cycle of sin, suffering, repentance, and restoration continues in our study of the Book of Judges. Israel had been oppressed by the Philistines, and the people had suffered the consequences of their sin and rebellion for forty years (13:1). Hearing the cries of His people, the “angel of the LORD” appeared to a barren woman who was the wife of Manoah, of the tribe of Dan.

Manoah’s wife was told she would bare a son, but not just any son. From the moment of his conception, his mother was to set herself and her son apart for the LORD (13:3-5).

She and her son were to follow Nazarite guidelines (Numbers 6:1-8) and its three prohibitions: She was not to drink wine or any strong drink (13:4, 7), nor eat anything unclean (13:4, 7), and her son’s hair was not to be cut (13:7).

Telling her husband she had been visited by “a man of God” (13:6), Manoah prayed to the LORD, “teach us what we shall do unto the child that shall be born” (13:8). God answered his prayer and the “angel of the LORD” appeared a second time (13:9-11). Manoah asked, “How shall we order the child, and how shall we do unto him?” (13:12)

Eager to be a good host by Eastern traditions and not understanding his guest was no ordinary man (13:16), Manoah desired to prepare a meal for his visitor (13:15). The “angel of the LORD” refused his invitation, but encouraged Manoah, “offer a burnt offering” (13:16).

Still blind to the identity of his guest, Manoah asked, “What is thy name?” under the pretense that when his son was born he would honor his guest (13:17).

The “angel of the LORD” answered Manoah with a question that was in fact a revelation saying, “Why askest thou thus after my name, seeing it is secret?” (13:18) The word “secret” might better be translated, “Wonderful.” In other words, too “Wonderful” to speak, one of the names of the Messiah revealed by Isaiah’s prophecy in Isaiah 9:6.

Isaiah 9:66  For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.

A flame suddenly came from within the rock and consumed the “kid” (young goat) Manoah offered as a meat offering. Revealing He was more than a man, “the angel of the LORD ascended in the flame of the altar” (13:20).

When Manoah realized his visitor was not a man, he said to his wife, “We shall surely die, because we have seen God” (13:22).  Manoah’s wife, having a greater understanding of the LORD’s character than her husband, replied, “If the LORD were pleased to kill us, he would not have received a burnt offering and a meat offering at our hands” (13:23).

Manoah’s wife gave birth to Samson and we read, “the child grew, and the LORD blessed him” (13:24) setting the stage for Samson to be moved by the “Spirit of the LORD” (13:25).

Judges 14-15 are familiar chapters for most, and I encourage you to read those passages in the absence of an extended commentary.

A Closing Thought: A Model of Godly Parenting

Consider the significant responsibility of child-bearing and child-rearing that were impressed upon the hearts of Samson’s mother and father. While he was in her womb, Samson’s mother was instructed to live a sanctified life and follow the same Nazarite guidelines her son would live under (13:4, 7).

Manoah, Samson’s father, understood the significance of the prophetic announcement of his son’s conception and birth. He desired to know what he was to teach his son (13:8) and his responsibility to prepare Samson for the LORD’S calling on his life (13:12).

All parents should bear the privilege and responsibility for their child’s spiritual and physical well-being.

Set a godly example by your lifestyle and choices. Search the Scripture to know not only how you should “order the child,” but also how you should “do unto him” (13:12).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith