Category Archives: Fool

The Plight of the Human Race (Psalm 53; Psalm 60)

Scripture reading – Psalm 53; Psalm 60

Our Scripture reading is from two psalms of David, Psalm 53 and Psalm 60. Our devotional is taken from Psalm 53.

Psalm 53 – An Observation of the Human Condition

Notice that Psalm 53 is nearly a restatement of truths observed by David in Psalm 14. The title of Psalm 53provides us the title of the person to whom it was addressed, “the Chief Musician.” It also provides the instrument used to accompany the singer, Mahalath (probably a stringed instrument), as well as the name of the melody, Maschil, that accompanied the psalm. As already noted, David is identified as the author in the title.

I invite you to identify three major truths found in Psalm 53: The fact of universal wickedness (53:1-3); the wicked’s denial of the providence of God (53:4-5); and David’s prayer that the LORD would save Israel, and rejoicing and gladness would be restored.

The Fool and His Plight (53:1-3)

David’s observations concerning the condition of man is not only well known, but should be self-evident to an honest observer. The folly of the fool is that he is an atheist, in word and deed! We read, “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.” Notice the phrase, “there is,” is in italics, indicating it was added by editors hoping to give clarity to the passage. I suggest, however, that the addition was unnecessary, for the folly of the fool is that he has not only denied God in his heart, but also in his deeds. David observed that the atheism of the fool carries him down a path of corruption, and destruction. Indeed, “there is none that doeth good” (53:1b).

The doctrine of God’s omniscience is stated in the next verse, where we read, “2God looked down from heaven upon the children of men, To see if there were any that did understand, that did seek God” (53:2). Having denied God, the fool may be convinced his sins go unnoticed and unpunished. Yet, God’s gaze is perpetually upon man, and he sees and tries the hearts to see if any seek Him (53:2).

Consider also that the plight of man is universal, and without exception: “Every one of them [every man, woman, boy, and girl] is gone back: they are altogether become filthy; There is none that doeth good, no, not one” (53:3). Universal rebellion; universal immorality; universal sin… “There is none that doeth good, no, not one.” (53:3).

Ponder that truth for a moment. There are no exceptions to the infection of sin. We are all infected by its curse, and the mass of humanity past, present, and future is born under the curse of sin (of course, the one exception was Jesus Christ who, though born of a woman, was not born of the seed of man, but of the Holy Spirit, Luke 1:35).

The apostle Paul observed the universality of sin, writing: “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23), and the universal consequences of sin: “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned” (Romans 5:12).

The Wicked’s Denial of the Providence of God (53:4-5)

The fool has not only rejected God, but he has also denied the visible evidences of God’s essence and providences as seen in His creation every day (53:4a). David warned, God is jealous of His people, and the wicked will not go unpunished for their ill treatment of them (53:4b).

There is a sad irony in this psalm. On the one hand, men boast, “There is no God,” but there is coming a day a judgment when fear will take hold of the hearts of men, and those who set themselves against Him will be destroyed (53:5a). Indeed, the wicked will be put to shame, for the LORD will hold them in contempt (53:5b).

David’s Prayer and Intercession for Israel (53:6)

Psalm 53 concludes with David looking forward to the day when Israel will be saved. In that day, “Jacob shall rejoice” (the lineage of the Twelve Tribes), and “Israel shall be glad” (53:6). Whom would God send to answer David’s prayer for a Savior? His name would be Jesus, “for He shall save His people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21).

Closing thoughts – Without exception; Every man or woman who rejects God, and refuses His offer of salvation through the sacrifice of His Son…is foolish. We might boast of our good works, but the prophet Isaiah declared, “all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags” (Isaiah 64:6). A sinner cannot be saved “by works of righteousness which [he has] done, but according to [God’s] mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost” (Titus 3:5).

Is He your Savior?

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

A Fool’s Decree: “No God!” (Psalm 14 and Psalm 16)

Scripture reading – Psalm 14; Psalm 16

Our devotional will consider two psalms of David, Psalm 14 and Psalm 16. The occasion of these two psalms is not given; however, Psalm 14 was certainly penned when David was king, for it is titled, “To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David.”

Psalms 14

The Fool’s Decree, Depravity, and Dilemma (14:1-3)

Psalm 14 presents the universal definition of a fool: “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They [fools] are corrupt, they have done abominable works, There is none that doeth good.”

We have the decree of the fool: He has “said in his heart, There is no God” (14:1b). “No God” is not merely something he said, but something that rises from within the man’s heart. He has rejected the Almighty, Supreme God, not only in his attitudes, and actions, but within his very heart, mind, and thoughts. He is not a fool because he is mentally deficient, or lacks academic accomplishments. No, he is a fool because in practice and principle, he has rejected God.

Notice the depravity of the fool is displayed in his wicked ways. Fools tend to be morally corrupt. Rejecting God, they have opened their hearts to all manner of wickedness. They are purveyors of abominable works. In Paul’s letter to believers in Rome, he described the abominations of those who reject God: “Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22-31). There is a universal commonality of all who reject God, and it is, “there is none that doeth good” (14:1).  Men may boast of their good deeds, but those who reject God, are fools.

Consider also the fool’s spiritual dilemma (14:2-3). Deny God at your peril, for your Creator is omniscient, and He knows all! Think of it: God ponders, and considers the hearts of all men, and asks: “Have all the workers of iniquity no knowledge?” (14:4a). In other words, are they utterly void of understanding, and overwhelmingly stupid in their actions to continue in iniquity?

Psalm 14 is also an indictment of fools: They devour God’s people (14:4b). They have no fear of God. They provoke the LORD to wrath (14:5). They shame all who look to the LORD as their refuge (14:6).

The final verse of Psalm 14 expresses a Messianic aspiration (14:7); a longing that the LORD would rule in Israel, and restore the joy and prosperity He alone can give.

Psalm 14:7Oh that the salvation [help; deliverance] of Israel [descendants of Jacob] were come out of Zion [mountain of Jerusalem]! When the LORD bringeth back [restores] the captivity [exile] of his people, Jacob [the patriarch of Israel] shall rejoice [be glad; be joyful], and Israel shall be glad [brighten; rejoice].

Don’t despair! The LORD has promised He will return, and when He does He will right the wrongs, and establish a kingdom of peace for a millennium before His final judgment.

Psalms 16Don’t fret! God is a sure refuge for believers!

“Michtam of David,” is the title of Psalm 16. Some commentaries suggest the title is a “Golden Psalm of David.”

David wrote:Preserve [guard; protect] me, O God: for in thee do I put my trust [hope; confidence]. 2  O my soul, thou hast said [promised] unto the LORD [Yahweh; Jehovah; Eternal, Self-existent God], Thou art my Lord [Master; God]: my goodness [favor; pleasing] extendeth not to thee [a believer has no goodness apart from the LORD]” (16:1-2).

In a world overwhelmed with strife, threats of terror, and hopelessness, what a comfort it is to be assured the LORD never abandons His people! God is a watchman and refuge. I am not sure what circumstances moved David to express his “delight” in the LORD, but his joy was sustained by his confidence in Him. David took comfort knowing the LORD was faithful, and his grace was sufficient to cover his failings and shortcomings (16:2b).

Not only was the Lord David’s refuge, He was all the king needed. David writes, “The Lord is the portion of mine inheritance and of my cup…the lines [measure; inheritance; portion] are fallen [divided; allotted] unto me in pleasant [delightful; lovely] places; Yea, I have a goodly [fair; pleasing] heritage [inheritance]” (16:5-6).

What a blessed place; to be where God is blessing! There are innumerable things for which we should be thankful; however, it is easy to allow the world to crowd out our joy with its sin and temptations.  I fear too many realize too late the blessings of the LORD.

Psalm 16 ends with a doxology of praise, and I encourage you to read and meditate on those verses. Notice especially Psalm 16:10, a Messianic promise of resurrection that was fulfilled in Christ’s resurrection from the dead: “10For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; Neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption(16:10; Acts 2:25-28).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Integrity is a Rare Virtue (1 Samuel 26)

Scripture reading – 1 Samuel 26

1 Samuel 26 presented David with a second opportunity to kill his enemy, and in spite of the appeal of his servant to take King’s Saul’s life, he refused, reasoning it would be a serious sin if he stretched “forth his hand against the LORD’S anointed” (26:9-24).

The Occasion (26:1-19)

David had come to Judah to seek safety among his kinsman; however, for a second time, the Ziphites, a family of the tribe of Judah, betrayed his hiding place to Saul (26:1). Whether out of fearing Saul, or seeking his favor, the treachery of one’s own was especially egregious. Saul, breaking his covenant with David (24:17-22), mobilized three thousand soldiers to pursue and kill David (26:2-5).  When David confirmed Saul’s encampment, he sought for a companion who would accompany him to the camp of his enemy (26:4-6).

While the king slept, David and Abishai slipped in and out of the king’s encampment, taking away Saul’s spear and his cruse of water (26:12). Ascending to a hill overlooking Israel’s encampment, David cried out, and awakening the army, taunted Abner, the king’s general, for his failure to protect Saul from harm (26:13-16).

Recognizing David’s voice, Saul disingenuously asked, “Is this thy voice, my son David?” (26:17)

Though he was his enemy, David honored the king, saying, “It is my voice, my lord, O king” (26:17). Rather than accuse the king, David asked, “Wherefore doth my lord thus pursue after his servant? for what have I done? or what evil is in mine hand?” (26:17-18) Appealing to the king’s spirit, David challenged the evil reports of other men, who had turned the heart of the king against him (26:19).

Saul’s Confession (26:21-25)

Saul confessed, he had “played the fool, and [had] erred exceedingly” (26:21). David then presented Saul’s spear, and proved he could have taken the king’s life (26:22), but had instead determined he “would not stretch forth [his] hand against the Lord’s anointed” (26:23). David had demonstrated integrity toward the king, and Saul acknowledged his testimony saying, “Blessed be thou, my son David: thou shalt both do great things, and also shalt still prevail” (26:25).

Though he had opportunity to kill his enemy, David had chosen to appeal to the king (26:18), and with humility requested,  “Let not my blood fall to the earth before the face of the Lord: for the king of Israel is come out to seek a flea, as when one doth hunt a partridge in the mountains” (26:20). The two men parted, and “David went on his way, and Saul returned to his place” (26:25).

Integrity is a rare virtue in our day, and there are few men whose lives are guided by immutable principles. David was such a man, and he was in the LORD’s words, “a man after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14). He was not a perfect man (as we will see in 1 Samuel 27); however, He loved the LORD. From His youth, he was an honorable son, a loyal friend, and a faithful servant.

Heroic in his deeds, humble in his walk, David was a man of integrity.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

My Enemy, and My Mouth (Psalm 141)

Scripture reading – Psalm 141

The title of Psalm 141 is simply stated, “A Psalm of David.” Knowing the author, but not knowing the time or place it was composed, we are left to our own opinion regarding the circumstances that inspired the psalm. It was certainly at a time of peril, and most likely composed when David fled into the wilderness from Saul (1 Samuel 20-22).

I suggest we consider the psalm in five parts. The first, David’s cry for the LORD’S favor (141:1-2). He prayed the LORD would “make haste unto [him]; give ear unto [his] voice” (141:1). Like a frightened child who screams, and the mother hastens to bring comfort, David trusted the LORD would hear his cry for help. He sought the LORD’S attention, and asked that his prayer be as sweet in God’s sight “as incense; and…the evening sacrifice” (141:2).

David desired to not only be the object of the LORD’S favor, but that he would be kept from sinning with his mouth (141:3-4). He prayed, 3Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; Keep the door of my lips” (141:3). Certainly, that is a prayer we should pray! Centuries later, James warned, “the tongue is a fire, a world of iniquity…it is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison” (James 3:5-6). David not only prayed for the LORD to bridle his tongue, but to keep him from following in the ways of wicked men (141:4).

He prayed the LORD would find in him the humility to heed wise counsel, and the meekness to accept rebuke as “an excellent oil” (141:5).

David had been the object of lies, and deceptions, but he prayed he would one day be vindicated, and his judges, his persecutors, would “hear [his] words” (141:6). Like bones scattered with no grave, David was in a desperate, hopeless place (141:7).

Fifthly, David committed to keep his eyes on God (141:8), and to trust the LORD would not abandon, and leave him alone (141:8). Praying for protection, and vindication, he commended himself to the LORD, and prayed his enemies would fall into the very snares they had laid for his own demise (141:9-10).

Of the five parts we observed in David’s prayer, perhaps the matter of the mouth should resonate in us all. What humility, we have noticed in David! Though he was a man on the run, and unjustly pursued by an enemy, he was nonetheless sensitive that he not be like his enemy, therefore he prayed, 3Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; Keep the door of my lips” (141:3).

David found it necessary to ask the LORD to help him watch his mouth, and be the doorkeeper of his lips. Should we not pray the same?

1 Peter 3:10 – “10For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile.”

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Two Paths: The Path of Blessing, and the Path of Punishment (Deuteronomy 29-30)

Scripture reading – Deuteronomy 29-30

Moses had declared God’s covenant with Israel, and restated the Laws and Commandments the people were to obey in the new land (Deuteronomy 5-28). His second oration completed; he called upon Israel to renew the covenant (29:1-2) they had entered into at Mt Horeb forty years prior (Exodus 24). Moses reminded the people of all the LORD had done for them in Egypt. He conceded how they had been blind to the ways of the LORD (29:4), and reminded them how He had lovingly sustained them in the wilderness (29:5-6).

Moses then summoned the people to gather, and challenged the nation to keep the words of the covenant. From the captains of the tribes, their elders, and officers, to the women, children, and lowly servants; all were called upon to “enter into the covenant with the LORD” (29:10-12).

Exhorting the people to obey the commandments, Moses admonished, should they break God’s covenant, and turn to idols, the nation would be punished with plagues, sicknesses, and the ground would be cursed (29:16-29). He warned the judgment of the LORD would leave the land like the “overthrow of Sodom, and Gomorrah” (29:23). He prophesied how the nations would look upon the desolation of Israel with amazement, and would ask, “Wherefore hath the Lord done thus unto this land? what meaneth the heat of this great anger?” (29:24). Men would answer, “Because they have forsaken the covenant of the Lord God of their fathers, which he made with them when he brought them forth out of the land of Egypt” (29:25).

Though the LORD promised to punish Israel for her disobedience, He also promised to be gracious, merciful, and forgiving if the people would repent of their sins, and turn back to Him (30:1-7). Should the people repent, God would renew His covenant with them, and He would “make [them] plenteous in every work of thine hand…for the Lord will again rejoice over thee for good, as he rejoiced over thy fathers” (30:9).

Summoning heaven and earth to be his witness, Moses warned: “I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live” (30:19).

I close, being reminded that everyone faces the dilemma of a choice between two paths in life. The way of faith, and righteousness, is the path of blessing, and eternal life; the way of sin, inevitably ends in death, and hell.

What path have you taken?

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

A Foolish Prophet, and His Chattering Donkey (Numbers 21-22) (part 2 of 2)

Scripture Reading – Numbers 21-22

This devotional commentary continues our summary review of Numbers 21, and will also consider Numbers 22. The LORD had spared Israel from greater judgment, by directing Moses to make, and lift up a brass serpent on a pole, that served as the object God provided for the people to look to look for their healing (21:1-9). 

Numbers 21:10-16 – A Song of Rejoicing

The nation continued on their journey to the Promised Land, skirting the border of Edom (Deuteronomy 2:4, 5), and coming to the “border of Moab” (21:13). There the people rejoiced for the water the LORD provided (21:14-18).

Numbers 21:10-31 – Victory over Sihon, King of the Amorites

Desiring to pass through the territory of the Amorites, “Israel sent messengers unto Sihon, king of the Amorites” (21:21), and requested safe passage through their land. The leaders of Israel vowed to not harm their crops, vineyards, or drink water from their wells (21:22). King Sihon, however, refused Israel’s request, and gathered his people and attacked the congregation (21:22). Israel rose up against the Amorites, and God gave them victory (21:24-25). Memorializing their victory over Sihon, king of the Amorites, Israel celebrated with a song (21:27-31).

Numbers 21:32-35 – The Defeat of Og, the King of Bashan

Building upon Israel’s defeat of the Amorites, the nation faced Og, king of Bashan. He attacked Israel, but the LORD assured Moses and Israel that He would give them victory. King Og was then defeated so soundly that “there was none left him alive: and they [Israel] possessed his land” (21:35).

Numbers 22 – Balak, King of the Moabites

The next several chapters, Numbers 22-24, introduces us to Balaam, whom we might describe as an unfaithful seer (a seer being a prophet, or fortune-teller), and a king of Moab named Balak.

Balak had heard how Israel defeated Og, king of Bashan, and Sihon, king of the Amorites, and his heart failed at the thought of facing this formidable foe that was marching through his land (22:1-4). Lacking confidence that his soldiers could defeat Israel, Balak turned to Balaam, and sent ambassadors to summon the prophet to come, and curse Israel (22:5-6). The king was confident “that he whom thou blessest is blessed, and he whom thou cursest is cursed” (22:6).

Coming with the promise his services would be well rewarded, the Moabite delegation insisted that Balaam come and curse Israel (22:7). The foolish prophet, rather than reject the Moabites invitation outright, and send them away, invited them, “Lodge here this night, and I will bring you word again, as the Lord shall speak unto me” (22:8a).

The LORD came to Balaam, and warned, “Thou shalt not curse the people: for they are blessed” (22:12). The next morning, Balaam sent the Moabites away, saying, “the Lord refuseth to give me leave to go with you” (22:13).

Receiving Balaam’s refusal, and desperate for help, Balak sent a second delegation more powerful and influential than the first (22:15). Those men came to Balaam promising to enrich, and “promote [him] unto very great honour,” if he would come and “curse…this people” (22:17).

Balaam knew he could not curse a people whom God blessed, nevertheless, he invited the Moabites to spend the night, and he would bring the matter before the LORD (22:19). That night, the LORD came to Balaam, and gave him liberty to go with the delegation (22:20-21).

Balaam rose the next day, saddled his donkey, and began his journey with the Moabites. As Balaam set out on his journey to Moab, “God’s anger was kindled because he went: and the angel of the Lord stood in the way for an adversary against him” (22:22).

The next verses (22:22-41), relate a humorous interaction between Balaam, his donkey, and the angel of the LORD, that has captivated mankind’s imagination for thousands of years. Balaam, spiritually blinded by the thought of the honors, rewards, and riches that were promised him, did not see what his donkey saw: the angel of the LORD had become Balaam’s adversary (22:22), and was “standing in the way, and his sword drawn in his hand” (22:23).

Fearing the angel, the donkey rushed off the road, running Balaam into a wall, and crushing his foot (22:25). Hobbled, and humiliated, Balaam struck his donkey. Still blind to the presence of the angel, Balaam attempted to continue his journey, but his donkey “fell down under [him]: and Balaam’s anger was kindled, and he smote the ass with a staff” (22:27). The LORD then gave the donkey voice, and the beast asked him, “What have I done unto thee, that thou hast smitten me these three times?” (22:28).

Balaam, filled with rage, answered his donkey’s rebuke, saying, “thou hast mocked me: I would there were a sword in mine hand, for now would I kill thee” (22:29). The dialog between the foolish prophet and his donkey continued (22:30), until “the Lord opened the eyes of Balaam, and he saw the angel of the Lord standing in the way, and his sword drawn in his hand: and [Balaam] bowed down his head, and fell flat on his face” (22:31). The angel revealed how Balaam’s donkey had saved his life (22:32-33), for surely he would have been slain for going with the Moabites.

Balaam confessed his sin, and spiritual blindness, and promised to turn back (22:34). The angel, however, directed Balaam to continue his journey to see Balak, the Moabite king, and there he would be directed by the LORD what things he should say (22:25-38).

To be continued….

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Don’t Trifle with God! (Job 37)

Scripture reading – Job 37

Job 37 brings us to the final chapter in Elihu’s protracted admonition of Job. Like his other friends, the younger Elihu had suggested that Job’s troubles had come because he had provoked God to wrath. Humiliated by his sorrows, and troubled by friends who had shown him no pity, Job remained silent throughout Elihu’s indictment.

Job 37:1-5 – Elihu invited Job to consider the majesty of God displayed in creation.

Speaking figuratively, Elihu encouraged Job to “hear [listen] attentively the noise [rumbling] of [God’s] voice, and the sound that goeth out of his mouth. 3He directeth it [the thunder] under the whole heaven, And his lightning unto the ends of the earth” (37:2-3). The sound of thunder is as the voice of God, and He “thundereth marvellously with his voice; Great things doeth he, which we cannot comprehend” (37:5).

Job 37:6-13 – God is the Director of the Snow, Ice, Rains, and Wind.

Not only is the majesty of God displayed in thunderstorms, but He displays His power and authority over nature when He guides the snow, ice, rain, and winds according to His will. He controls winter weather, and sends spring showers (37:6). He can stop all human activity with a storm, for “He sealeth up the hand of every man; that all may know His work” (37:7a).

Speaking symbolically, Elihu suggested that frost was “the breath of God” (37:10), and the clouds a reminder of His presence and providence (37:11). Storms and winds accomplish God’s will, and “do whatsoever He commandeth them upon the face of the world in the earth” (37:12b). Sometimes storms come as an manifestation of divine judgment, and other times as a expression of God’s mercy (37:13).

Job 37:14-22 – Elihu’s Parting Admonition: No Man Should Dare Judge Divine Providence.

Having illustrated the nature and power of the Creator, Elihu challenged: “14Hearken [Listen] unto this, O Job: Stand still, and consider the wondrous works of God” (37:14). Man cannot know why God sends the lighting, nor why He distributes the clouds as He does (37:15-16). Job was reminded that man has nothing to do with how God orders nature (37:18)

Job had complained, were he given an opportunity, he would ask God for an explanation of all that he had suffered. Elihu, after describing the majesty of God over His creation, remembered Job’s boldness, and sarcastically challenged him, “19Teach us what we shall say unto Him; For we cannot order our speech by reason of darkness” (37:19). Elihu suggested, should any man be so foolish to question God’s providence, “surely he [would] be swallowed up” by Him (37:20).

Job 37:23-24 – The Majesty of Almighty God

No man can measure, define, or find El Shaddai, “the Almighty” (37:23). He is all powerful, just, and “He will not afflict” for the purpose of doing evil (37:23b). He is Sovereign, one to be feared and revered, and respects no man who thinks himself wise (37:24).

Take a lesson from Elihu: Don’t Trifle with God!

Matthew 10:2828And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear Him [the LORD] which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

Acquiring Wisdom Demands Hard Work and Sacrifice (Job 27-28)

Scripture reading – Job 27-28

Bildad had concluded his final address to Job, reminding him that, in the sight of Almighty God, a man can never be justified (25:4), for he is nothing more than a maggot (25:6). Job’s response to Bildad’s assertions comprised his longest speech, beginning with Job 26:1, and concluding with Job 31:40. We continue our examination of Job’s response, considering two chapters, Job 27-28.

Job 27 – Job’s Parable: His Wise Response to Bildad (27:1)

Job continued his speech, but this time directed his appeal to God and complained that he felt he had been dealt with harshly (27:1-2). He acknowledged God as his Creator, and realized that he was like Adam, a man in whom “the Spirit of God is” (27:3; Genesis 2:7).

Job’s friends had challenged him to confess his sins, but he asserted his innocence and declared, “4My lips shall not speak wickedness, Nor my tongue utter deceit [lies]. 5God forbid that I should justify you [affirm or agree with their false accusations]: Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me” (27:4-5).

Job would not compromise his integrity, to appease his lying friends. His character and testimony were more important to him than pacifying men who assailed him. He was determined to be an honest man, one who would not bear the sorrow of a guilty conscience (27:6).

Job confessed that the wicked are not always punished according to their sins, but the judgment of God is inevitable (27:11-23). For instance, the children of the wicked often suffer for the transgressions of their fathers. They are destined “for the sword” (they often die early, tragic deaths), and they are never “satisfied with bread” (never happy or content, 27:14). When the wicked die, they have so embittered their wives that, their “widows shall not weep” for them (27:15). The households of the wicked are unstable, for “he buildeth his house as a moth” (27:18).

When the wicked lie down in death, the honors heaped upon him in life are soon lost and forgotten (27:19); and the terror of death, and the wrath of God come upon him suddenly (27:20), and he will be shown no mercy (27:22).

Job 28 – Searching for Wisdom Compared to A Miner’s Labor

Job described the lengths that men go to in seeking wisdom, and he drew an analogy with men who work in mines digging for gold and silver (28:1), and refining stones for iron, brass, and copper (28:2).

The intense labor of the miner is described (28:3-11). He digs a shaft into the earth, and brings light in search of ore (“stones of darkness,” 28:3). As the ground and rocks of the earth are mined, they reveal “sapphires…dust of gold” (28:6). The miner lays his hand to the rocks, and overturns mountains in seeking rich ore (28:9). He cuts channels in the rock (“rivers among the rocks”), and prevents waters from flowing into the mine (28:10-11).

The search for wisdom is as intense as the miner’s search for precious metals and stones.

“Where shall Wisdom Be Found?” (28:12)

Wisdom, unlike “book learning,” is not something a man can acquire in a classroom, or by hiring others to labor for him. True wisdom, the wisdom that only God can impart to a man, is priceless (28:13a). One cannot mine wisdom out of the earth, or find it by exploring the depths of the sea (28:14). Wisdom cannot be purchased with gold or silver (28:15), and the purest gold is not to be compared to it (28:16-19).

If wisdom is so valuable, and rare, “Whence then cometh wisdom?” (28:20). Wisdom is “hid from the eyes” of man and “the fowls of the air” (28:21). You cannot find wisdom, though you seek it among the dead who have passed from this life (28:22).

God Alone is the Source of Wisdom (28:23-28)

23God understandeth the way thereof, And He knoweth the place thereof” (28:23). Man can only know wisdom by God’s revelation. God sees and knows all things, “24For he looketh to the ends of the earth, And seeth under the whole heaven” (28:24). God is Creator, and He knows the weight of the winds and the water, and regulates the rain and the “way for the lightning” (28:25-26).

Where Might a Man Acquire Wisdom? (28:28)

“The fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; And to depart from evil is understanding” (28:28).

The acquisition of wisdom begins with the fear and reverence of God (a fear of God and wisdom are inseparable).

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

The Tragic Consequences of Generational Sins (Job 20-21)

Scripture reading – Job 20-21

Job 20 records the second and final response of Zophar the Naamathite (his first speech was recorded in Job 11). Offended by Job’s admonition that his “friends” would face God’s wrath for their harsh judgments (19:28-29), Zophar’s rebuke came swift and furious (20:1-3).

Job 20:4-29 – The Fate of the Wicked

Like his friends, Zophar inferred that Job’s afflictions were to be expected by those who are wicked. Consider three erroneous opinions Zophar stated regarding his observations of the wicked.

The first error, that the wicked always come to destruction (20:4-11).

Zophar submitted that the rejoicing of the wicked is brief (20:4), and the honors bestowed on them perishes with them, and they are soon forgotten (20:5-8). Neither of those statements is necessarily true. In fact, the wicked often live out their lives enjoying ill acquired wealth, and their funerals and tombs are often grand spectacles to behold.

The second error, that the wicked will not prosper (20:12-23).

Continuing his erroneous observations, Zophar suggested that the prosperity of the wicked is brief (20:12), inevitably bites like a poisonous viper (20:13-16), and he dies in want.

One need remembers the LORD’s parable of a rich fool (Luke 12:16-21) to understand the error in Zophar’s reasoning. Beguiled with the pleasures of his riches, the rich man ordered his barns be torn down to build greater barns, and said to his soul, “Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry” (Luke 12:19). Rather than die in want, the rich fool died as he had lived, enjoying his wealth until he learned in eternity that he was the poorest of men: “20But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided? 21So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God” (Luke 12:20–21).

The third error in Zophar’s observations was that only the wicked suffer devastating sorrows, and catastrophic losses (20:24-29).

Zophar maintained that the wicked are struck down (20:24-25), and all that he has is destroyed (20:26).  He observed that the wicked feel everything is against him, until his riches are consumed by God’s wrath (20:27-28).

While it might be argued that the wicked often suffer loss, it is more often true that they are rewarded by the system of this fallen world, and hailed for their ill-gotten gains (John 15:19a).

The implication of Zophar’s argument was that Job’s sorrows were a wicked man’s afflictions, and such is the lot or “heritage,” God has “appointed” for the wicked (20:29).

Job 21 – Rather than Suffer, the Wicked Prosper

I will summarize Job 21 by outlining Job’s disagreement with Zophar’s fallacies. Demanding his friends be silent that he might speak, Job sarcastically challenged them that after he had spoken, “mock on” (21:1-2).

Confessing his struggle was with God, not with men (21:3-6), Job observed that the wicked and their children often live long lives, and enjoy prosperity (21:7-13). He contended that the riches of the wicked cause their hearts to be calloused, and “they say unto God, Depart from us; For we desire not the knowledge of thy ways. 15What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? And what profit should we have, if we pray unto him?” (21:14-15)

Failing to realize that they deserve nothing, and all that they have is a testimony of God’s grace and longsuffering, the prosperity of the wicked moves them to reject God (21:16).

Do not assume that the wicked go unpunished.

The consequences of sin are inevitable, and the wicked are “18 as stubble before the wind, And as chaff that the storm carrieth away. 19God layeth up his [the wicked’s] iniquity for his children: He rewardeth him, and he shall know it” (21:18-19).

Here is a tragic truth: The children of the wicked often suffer the influence of their parent’s sins. That truth is stated three times in the Law (Exodus 20:5; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9).

Numbers 14:18 – “18The Lord is longsuffering, and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation.”

Warning: The consequences of your sins may be borne by your children.

A Personal Note: Knowing this devotional series is read daily by hundreds of believers, I covet your prayers for my wife. She was hospitalized today, January 19, 2021, with pneumonia and we are waiting on confirmation if her illness is COVID-19 related. As you might imagine, the devotions in the Book of Job have been personal, and have coincided with my wife and me facing our own afflictions. Thank you for interceding for us. I will update this prayer request when I receive news.

Copyright 2021 – Travis D. Smith

The Judgment of God (Romans 1-3)

Scripture reading – Romans 1-3

Our chronological Scripture reading schedule brings us today to Paul’s Epistle to the Romans.  You will notice the apostle’s salutation declares from the outset that he is writing to believers in Rome, and identifying himself as a “a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God” (Romans 1:1).

Lest some have a misunderstanding regarding the believers in Rome, allow me to state unequivocally that these were not members of an early version of the Roman Catholic Church. Roman Catholicism is a blend of various elements of ancient paganism, and manmade traditions that are a gross departure from the Word of God. Paul’s letter was received by men and women whose confidence in their salvation was not predicated upon rituals and traditions, but upon the sincere, unadulterated Scriptures, of which, that gospel was declared first by the “prophets in the Holy Scriptures” (1:2), and fulfilled in Jesus Christ (1:3).

You will read in Romans 1 a familiar, pastoral affection that Paul has expressed in earlier epistles, and repeats in his letter to believers in Rome (1:7-12). Evoking an affirmation of God’s love for the believers (“beloved of God, and called to be saints”, 1:7), the apostle states his longing to visit them, whose “faith is spoken of throughout the whole world” (1:8, 11).

A Portrait of Man’s Rebellion and Sinful Depravity (Romans 1:20-32)

The depth and breadth of the truths contained in Romans 1 could fill volumes of commentaries; however, I will take only the liberty to amplify the meanings of the word found in the Scriptures, and allow them to speak the Truth themselves.

Romans 1:20-22 For the invisible things [things which cannot be perceived with the physical senses] of Him [God] from [by means of] the creation of the world are clearly seen [General or Natural revelation], being understood [God’s person and power understood by the evidences of His creation] by the things that are made [Creation is a display of God’s power and person], even His eternal power and Godhead [deity; divine nature]; so that they are without excuse [no excuse for idolatry – Isaiah 44:8-20]:

21 Because that, when they knew [had a knowledge of the Person, Power and Presence of God] God, they glorified him not as God [refused to honor and reverence Him], neither were thankful [ingratitude; hard hearted]; but became vain [full of pride; conceited] in their imaginations [thoughts; reasonings; unwillingness to acknowledge God], and their foolish heart [mind; lacking understanding] was darkened [incapable of comprehending Truth]22 Professing [asserting; declaring] themselves to be wise [“philosophers” – lovers of wisdom; wise in their own estimation], they became fools [void of understanding; lacking any moral sense; incapable of discerning between good and evil],

Romans 1:26-27 – For this cause God gave them up [commended; delivered] unto vile [disgraceful; degrading] affections [passions; lust; i.e. evil desires]: for even [also] their women did change [exchange; transform] the natural [instinctive; physical; inborn] use [i.e. sexual intercourse] into that which is against [opposed to; contrary] nature [mankind; the nature of things as God created]:
27
And likewise [similarly; moreover] also the men, leaving [forsake; abandoned] the natural [instinctive; physical; according to nature] use [i.e. sexual intercourse] of the woman, burned [inflamed; to set on fire; i.e. raging lust] in their lust [desire; longing; craving]  one toward another [continually]; men with men working [doing; performing; committing] that which is unseemly [shameful; indecent; obscene], and receiving [what is due; retribution] in [quickly; shortly; afterwards] themselves [in their own bodies and/or souls] that recompence [penalty; compensation] of their error [straying; delusion; deceit] which was meet [necessary; required; inevitable; i.e. must needs be as an exacting of God’s justice].

Romans 1:28 -32 – And even as [insomuch as; that] they did not like [refused; i.e. were not able] to retain [possess; have; hold] God in their knowledge [memory; recognition], God gave them over [commended; delivered] to a reprobate [worthless; rejected; unworthy; abandoned] mind [thought; feeling; will], to do those things which are not convenient [becoming; proper; fit; right]; 29  Being filled with [satisfied; saturated with] all unrighteousness [wrong; iniquity], fornication [all manner of sexual immorality, including adultery and incest], wickedness [depravity; malice; evil desires], covetousness [greed; extortion; desire to have more], maliciousness [evil; desire to injure]; full of envy [jealousy; wishing ill on another], murder, debate [quarreling; contentiousness; strife], deceit [guile; craftiness; lie], malignity [bad character; dishonorable; attributing to others evil intent]; whisperers [gossips; slanderer; ], 30  Backbiters [slanderers; speaking against another], haters of God, despiteful [insulter; violent aggressor; treating others shamefully], proud [haughty; arrogant; treating others with disdain , boasters [braggart; i.e. swaggerer], inventors of evil things [harmful; depraved; morally wrong], disobedient [hard; not pliable; unteachable] to parents, 31  Without understanding, covenantbreakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful: 32  Who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but have pleasure in them that do them.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith