Category Archives: Law

The End is Come, and the Word of God is Silenced (Amos 7; Amos 8)

Scripture reading – Amos 7; Amos 8

Continuing his prophetic ministry, Amos delivered to the people of Israel five prophetic visions of imminent judgment. This devotional will consider the first four judgments recorded in Amos 7-8.

Amos 7 – Three Visions of Judgment

A Vision of Grasshoppers [Locusts] (7:1-3)

Locusts (identified as grasshoppers) were, and are, a devastating event for people living in an agrarian economy. Eating and destroying everything in their path, locusts can be so thick in number that they turn the light of day into darkness. In ancient times, the massing of locusts would potentially lead to famine for a people and nation.

God showed to Amos a judgment of locusts that would befall Israel, devouring the second growth of crops (the first crop being that which the king taxed, 7:1). Amos pled with the LORD for Jacob (Israel), stating that Jacob was a small nation, and if met with devastation, how would they survive? The LORD “repented” and had compassion on the people (7:3). Though the sins of the nation invited God’s judgment, the LORD heard the prayer of His prophet and determined to withhold judgment for a season.

A Vision of Fire (7:4-6)

Fire is a symbol of judgment throughout the Scriptures, and the LORD used the same to warn Amos that God’s judgment on Israel would be so destructive, it would consume everything (7:4). Again, Amos interceded for Israel and reasoned with the LORD, saying, “O Lord God, cease, I beseech thee: By whom shall Jacob [the father of the Twelve Tribes of Israel] arise? for he is small” (7:5). The LORD heard his prophet’s intercessory prayer, “repented,” and said, “This also shall not be” (7:6).

The Vision of a Plumb Line (7:7-9)

A plumb line was a tool used by builders to ensure the blocks of a wall were laid straight. Attaching a weight to twine or rope, the plumb line would give block layers a straight line to follow as they raised up the walls of a city or building.

God gave Amos a vision of a plumb line, with the LORD Himself standing “upon a wall…with a plumbline in His hand” (7:7). The LORD questioned His prophet, and asked, “Amos, what seest thou?” (7:8a). Amos identified the plumb line, and the LORD said, “Behold, I will set a plumbline in the midst of my people Israel: I will not again pass by them any more” (7:8).

The plumb line was a symbol of a perfect standard, and one by which a man’s work could be judged. In this vision, the plumb line was a symbol of God’s perfect standard for His people…His Law and Commandments. Israel had rejected God’s perfect standard, and was condemned as a nation and people (7:8).

God’s judgment was inevitable, and Amos did not pray for God to spare Israel. The people had failed to obey God’s Law, and refused to measure themselves by His plumb line. Therefore, “the high places of Isaac shall be desolate, And the sanctuaries of Israel shall be laid waste; and I will rise against the house of Jeroboam [the first king of a divided Israel] with the sword” (7:9).

Amos’ Confrontation with the Spiritual and Political Leaders of Israel (7:10-17)

The words and prophecies of Amos reached the ears of “Amaziah the priest of Bethel,” and he defamed God’s prophet to Jeroboam II, the king of Israel (7:10-11). Amaziah served as priest to the false gods of Israel at Bethel (where Jeroboam I had erected a golden calf for the people to worship). That heathen priest attacked the character and ministry of God’s prophet, and accused Amos of conspiring against Israel. He warned Jeroboam II that the prophet had prophesied he would “die by the sword,” and Israel would be conquered and “led away captive out of their own land” (7:11).

Amaziah had sought to intimidate Amos, and demanded the prophet return to Judah, “and there eat bread, and prophesy” (7:10). Desiring to silence Amos, Amaziah warned, “prophesy not again any more at Beth-el: for it is the king’s chapel, and it is the king’s court” (7:13). Rather than heed God’s warning of judgment against Israel, Amaziah ordered the prophet be silent and “prophesy not again” (7:13).

Amos, however, was undeterred, and refused to be silent. He boldly asserted how he had not sought to be a prophet, and neither was he “a prophet’s son” (7:14). He “was an herdman [shepherd], and a gatherer of sycomore fruit [a farmer]: 15 [Saying] the Lord took me as I followed the flock, and the Lord said unto me, Go, prophesy unto my people Israel” (7:14-15).

Amos then answered Amaziah with a personal, prophetic warning directed to that wicked priest. He foretold the great judgments that would befall his household: His wife would become a “harlot in the city,” his sons and daughters would “fall by the sword” (his lineage would die), the land would be divided, “and Israel [would] surely go into captivity” (7:17).

Amos 8

The Fourth Vision (8:1-3)

The imminence of God’s judgment was foretold, as “a basket of summer fruit” that was ready to be harvested (8:1). The LORD warned, “The end is come upon my people of Israel; I will not again pass by them any more” (8:2).

Israel had passed the point of repentance and the “songs of the temple,” would turn to the howls of sorrow and death (8:3). At the time of God’s judgment, there would be so many dead bodies there would be no place or time for a proper burial (8:3).

The End is Near (8:4-10)

The abuses of the rich and powerful, and how they had oppressed the poor (8:4-6), would be answered with God’s judgment. God promised He would not forget their wickedness (8:7-9). Israel’s feasts days and songs would be turned to sorrows and hopeless lamentations (8:10).

Closing thoughts – What would mark the end of days, and the judgment of God? Famine! (8:11-13)

Not a famine of food and water, but a famine “of hearing the words of the LORD” (8:11). The Word of God would be silent, and the prophets no more. Men would “seek the word of the LORD,” and young men and women would “faint for thirst” (8:13). It would be too late, and the Word of the LORD would not be found (8:12-13).

Believer, like Israel of old, that day is upon us, and the Word of God is falling silent.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Woe to the Proud (Amos 6)

Scripture reading – Amos 6

Amos 6

Amos 6 continues the prophet’s declarations of woes against Israel, identified as Samaria, and Judah, identified as Zion (6:1). Both nations are characterized as being “at ease” (meaning carefree, overly-confident, careless); however, the focus of chapter 6 is primarily upon Israel (the northern ten tribes).

Amos’ Admonition to the Careless Leaders of Israel (6:2-6)

Three great heathen cities are identified in Amos 6:2, and held before Israel as examples of cities greater than Jerusalem and Samaria, that would succumb to a greater enemy (which history reveals as Assyria). Calneh was an ancient city identified as Nimrod, who also founded Babel (6:2a). Hamath was the capital city of Syria (6:2b), and Gath was one of the principal cities of the Philistines.

After identifying those great Gentile cities, for all would fall before the armies of the Assyrian empire, Amos challenged the careless leaders of Israel, “Be they better than these kingdoms? Or their border greater than your border?” (6:2). Amos questioned if the leaders of Israel and Judah were foolish enough to believe the same would not soon befall them (6:2). Though they had been warned, there were some who refused to believe and “put far away the evil day” until the “seat of violence” was at the gates of the city (6:3).

They were guilty of self-indulgence, and oppressed the poor of Israel, while the wealthy immersed themselves in extravagant luxury (6:4-6). They were lethargic, and gluttonous (6:4). They desired to be pleasured with music (6:5), were guilty of excessive drinking, and anointed themselves with expensive perfumes, yet, they gave no thought to the sorrows and sufferings of their countrymen (6:6).

The Judgment to Befall the Wealthy, Self-indulgent of Israel (6:7-11)

The ones who had oppressed the poor while pampering themselves in wealth and possessions were the first to be exiled and taken into captivity (6:7). God had sworn an oath of judgment against those who were filled with pride and presumption (6:8).

Amos painted a picture of destruction and devastation that would befall Israel, and the great majority of the people of Israel would perish (8:9). So many would die, the people would resort to cremation (usually reserved for criminals) to dispose the bodies of the dead (6:9-10). The destruction of houses described in Amos 6:11 is believed to have been caused by an earthquake.

Five Things That Should Not Be (6:12-13)

Amos wisely illustrated God’s wisdom by referencing nature as the teacher.  The first and second teaching points are easy to understand: Horses should not run on rocks (for they risk falling and either hurting themselves or their rider), and oxen should not plow over a rock strewn field (for there is little reward, 6:12b).

Amos continues to offer wisdom in terms that register deep with mankind. Polluting justice runs contrary to God’s divine order (6:12C), and is much like perverting the sweetness of righteousness with bitterness (6:12d). Finally, whether a nation or a man, it is foolish to boast of one’s strength, for boasting will inevitably come to nothing and prove you wrong (6:13).

Closing thoughts – For all the pride and boasting of Israel’s leaders, Amos delivered the inescapable fact of God’s judgment. All would be fulfilled as the LORD had promised and Amos had prophesied. Assyria would destroy the strongholds of Israel, and the proud and oppressed would be carried away into captivity (6:14).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

“Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel” (Amos 4; Amos 5)

Scripture reading – Amos 4; Amos 5

We have seen that Amos was a shepherd (herdsman) when God called Him out of obscurity (1:1) to serve as His prophet to Israel (the northern ten tribes). Israel and Judah were enjoying a season of peace and prosperity, making Amos’ message of doom all the more unpopular with the leaders and common people of both nations.

Amos 4-6 records a series of forewarnings the prophet delivered to Israel, calling that nation to repent of its wickedness. If not, Amos warned the judgment of God was imminent.

Amos 4 – The Chastisement of Israel and a Prophecy of That Nation’s Fall

Male or Female: The Kine (Cows) of Bashan (4:1-3)

Amos 4 is rich in detail, and a point of interest that is timely for our day concerns the “kine of Bashan” (1:1). Bashan was part of the rich pasture lands located on the east side of the Jordan River. Bashan was known for its well-fed cattle, and thus the people of that region were addressed metaphorically in Amos 4:1-3 as the “kine of Bashan.”

While the word “kine” is female in gender (4:1), the pronoun “you” is masculine in the Hebrew (4:2). Thus, the warning of God’s judgment for oppressing the poor and crushing the needy was addressed to either strong females, or emasculated male leaders. Knowing homosexuality is the pinnacle of wickedness for a dying nation and people (Romans 1:26-27), I believe that sin represented a fullness of man’s departure from the Law, thereby naturally receiving God’s judgment. Amos warned the LORD had determined to send the people away (“take you away with hooks, and your posterity with fishhooks”), and no place in Samaria would be a refuge (1:3).

A Series of Judgments (4:4-11)

The LORD scorned the hypocrisy of the people who brought sacrifices to Bethel and Gilgal. They had maintained an outward form of worship, while continuing in their wickedness.

The LORD had sent a series of judgments upon the nation, but each time the people had refused to repent and return to the LORD (4:6-11). They had suffered famine (4:6), and drought (4:7-8), but would not repent. He sent plagues and mildew upon the crops, and the nation suffered plagues comparable to those experienced in Egypt, yet Israel would not turn to the LORD (4:10). Cities in Israel were destroyed by fire, reminiscent of Sodom and Gomorrah, but the people still would not turn from their sin to the LORD (4:11).

An Ominous Warning (4:12-13)

Obstinate, rebellious, and hypocritical, Amos warned the people, “Prepare to meet thy God, O Israel” (4:12). Amos urged the people to prepare to face the Creator’s judgment, warning that (4:13b) He knows every thought of man. He is everywhere, and “treadeth upon the high places of the earth” (4:13c).

Who is the LORD? He is “the God of hosts” (4:13d).

Amos 5 – A Lamentation for Israel

Though Amos was charged with the non-enviable task of warning Israel of pending judgment, he was nevertheless moved to sorrow and compassion for that rebellious people. That prophet’s lament for the “house of Israel” is recorded in Amos 5:1-3.

Amos foretold how Israel would be overthrown and suffer utter devastation. No longer pure, Amos writes, “the virgin of Israel is fallen,” and she would never rise from the ashes of her ruin (5:2a). The prophet foretold, the people would be removed from their land, and no one will come to her aid (5:2). One-tenth of the people would be all that remained in the land (5:3).

God’s Longsuffering (5:4-9)

In spite of their sins, the LORD longed to show compassion to Israel, and He invited the people, “Seek ye me, and ye shall live” (5:4). Amos admonished the people to forsake Bethel, Gilgal, and Beersheba, for those sacred places would “come to nought” (5:5). Again, Amos exhorted the people, “6Seek the Lord, and ye shall live” (5:6a).

The prophet reminded Israel how the LORD was the Creator of the constellations (5:8a). Their God was sovereign, and the sustainer of creation (causing the sun to rise dispelling the darkness, and He controls the waters of the sea, 5:8b). Amos warned, no stronghold would be safe from His judgment (5:9).

Israel’s Sins Invited God’s Judgment (5:10-15)

Israel had rejected God’s Truth, and had no tolerance for preachers of God’s Word. They “[hated] him that rebuketh in the gate, and they [abhorred] him that speaketh uprightly” (5:10). The wealthy were guilty of taxing the “poor,” and they flaunted their wealth, building great stone cut houses (5:11a). They had planted vineyards, but Amos warned they would not live to enjoy their ill-gotten gains (5:11b).

Closing thoughts – Speaking for the LORD, Amos condemned Israel for the same sins we observe in our day: The righteous were oppressed, bribes perverted justice, and judges favored the rich, and denied the poor justice, fairness and impartiality (5:12). Amos declared, the prudent would keep silent on that day of judgment (5:13). Why? Most likely because they would accept the suffering of the nation as the fate it was due, and therefore God’s plan and purpose (5:13).

With the passion of a faithful preacher, Amos called upon Israel to “seek good, and not evil, that ye may live…Hate the evil, and love the good, and establish judgment in the gate” (5:14-15).

Pronouncements of “Woe!” close the chapter (5:18-27).  The people had continued making a pretense of worship (5:21-22), but God knew their hearts (5:23), and Amos warned:

God’s judgment would soon run over the nation like flood waters.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

A Sorry State: Knowing Neither Right nor Wrong (Amos 2-3)

Scripture reading – Amos 2; Amos 3

Amos had prophesied that six Gentile nations would be judged for their transgressions against God, His people (Israel and Judah), and humanity in general (Amos 1): Syria, identified as Damascus (1:3-5), Philistia, identified by its principal cities (1:6-8), Tyre (who were Phoenician, 1:9-10), Edom (1:11-12), Ammon (1:13-15), and Moab (2:1-3). The judgment of those six nations was certain, and would serve as a warning to Judah and Israel, that God is just and their transgressions would not go unpunished (2:4-16).

The Case Against Judah and Israel (2:4-11)

Amos declared the sins and transgressions of Judah (2:4-5) and Israel (2:6-16) announcing God’s judgment (2:6-16).  Lest any doubt the grace and longsuffering of God, the prophet reminded the people how the LORD had brought them out of Egypt (2:9), led them through the wilderness for forty years, and given them the land of the Amorites for their possession (2:9-10). In His longsuffering and compassion, the LORD had sent prophets to preach His Word and teach His Law and Commandments (2:11).

God’s Response to Israel’s Rebellion (2:12-16)

How had the people responded?

They had tempted the Nazarites (who were models of dedication and service) to violate their sanctification and break their vows (Numbers 6:1-20). When the prophets preached the Word of the LORD, they “commanded the prophets, saying, Prophesy not” (2:12).

God Declared His Judgment of the People (2:13-16)

The Lord warned, He would crush Israel with the weight of a cart “full of sheaves” (of wheat, 2:13). Israel’s military would be soundly defeated (2:14-16). The soldiers would take flight from the battle, but neither be swift, strong, or able to retreat (2:14). Archers would fail to stand in their places, horsemen could not flee, and the nation’s mightiest warriors would drop their weapons and flee with nothing (“shall flee away naked in that day,” 2:16).

Amos 3 – A Description of Israel’s Judgment for Its Transgressions

The Basis of God’s Judgment Against the “Children of Israel” (3:1-2)

Amos 3:1 declared God’s judgment for their transgressions would not only be against Israel (the ten tribes in the north), but “against the whole family” (thus including Judah, the southern kingdom). The prophet reminded all who were descendants of the Hebrews that came out of Egypt, that they were a chosen, beloved people (Genesis 12:3; 28:14). Yet, the LORD declared, “I will punish you for all your iniquities (3:2).

A Series of Rhetorical Questions that Illustrated “Cause and Effect” (3:3-6)

In a series of questions, Amos declared a principle we will call, “cause and effect.” The first questions made the implication that the answer to each would be, “No.”  The first, “3Can two walk together, except they be agreed?” (3:3). Of course, the answer was, “No.” To walk together, there must be an agreement by both parties on the plan (method) and destination.

Two questions regarded the lion on the hunt, and asked, “4Will a lion roar in the forest, when he hath no prey? Will a young lion cry out of his den, if he have taken nothing?” (3:4). Again, the answer is, “No.” A lion on the hunt prowls in stealth and is cautious, not alerting its prey; and a young lion would not roar its approval if it has nothing to consume.

The capture of a bird in a trap is the subject of two more questions, that asked: “5Can a bird fall in a snare upon the earth, where no gin [trigger] is for him? Shall one take up a snare from the earth, and have taken nothing at all?” (3:5) Again, the presumed answer is, “No.” Without a trigger to snap a trap shut upon its prey, no bird will be entrapped. Of course, removing a snare with no prey makes no sense either.

Two other questions demand “No” for an answer: “Shall a trumpet be blown in the city, and the people not be afraid?” (3:6a) In ancient times, the sound of a trumpet would warn the city of an approaching enemy (3:6a), and give reason for fear and for mounting a defense.

The last question was noteworthy, for it illustrated the sovereignty and providence of God: “Shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it?” (3:6b) Whether troubles befall a city, state, or a nation, we are assured it is the doing of the LORD, and for His eternal purpose.

Witnesses to God Punishing His People (3:9-10)

Adding to Israel’s humiliation, God commanded Amos to summon two Gentile nations to witness His judgment of Israel: Ashdod, a city representing the Philistines, and Egypt (3:9). Those heathen nations were summoned to “the mountains of Samaria” (the capital city of north Israel), and observe God’s judgment upon His people for their sins.

The wealthy and powerful of Israel were guilty of oppressing the weak and the poor, and filling their palaces with plunder and spoil. Because they had rejected God’s Law and Commandments, the people had become spiritually blind, and “know not to do right, saith the LORD” (3:10).

God’s Judgment Pronounced: Israel Would Be Devoured by An Enemy (3:11-15)

History reveals Assyria as the enemy that destroyed the northern kingdom. The Assyrians would come through the land, and destroy Israel’s defenses (3:11). The people would be ravaged like a sheep in the mouth of a lion (3:12), and all Israel would be judged (3:13). The altars to the gods erected by Jeroboam would be abolished (3:14), and the great palaces and houses of the wealthy would be utterly destroyed (3:15).

Closing thoughts – When a people and nation make light of God’s Truth, and reject His Commandments, their hearts will become so desensitized to wickedness that they lack moral judgment, and “know not to do right” (3:10).  Sadly, the world around us gives ample evidence of what will become of a society that rejects God and His Laws.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

“Woe to the Nation That Turns from the LORD and His Law” (Isaiah 4; Isaiah 5)

Scripture reading – Isaiah 4; Isaiah 5

Our study of the prophecies of Isaiah brings us to Isaiah 4 and 5. Remembering chapter breaks and verse numbers are the effort of editors to assist Bible students, I am in agreement with some that Isaiah 4:1 concludes the previous chapter’s topic and the judgment Isaiah prophesied would befall Jerusalem. Drawing a vivid picture of God’s judgment, the prophet described the desperation of that time.

So many men would die in the battle described in Isaiah 3, that there would be seven women to every man (4:1). Isaiah 4 continued with the prophecy of a future time when Israel would be restored to the land, and Christ Himself will reign (“the branch of the LORD”, 4:2).

Isaiah 5

Employing an agricultural parable, Isaiah described God’s love and care for His people (5:1-7). With the LORD pictured as a farmer, His loving favor for Judah was portrayed as his “well-beloved.”

The LORD’s Loving Preparation for Israel (5:1-2)

God promised to plant his vineyard (a symbol of Israel), upon the best ground, “a very fruitful hill,” (5:1). “He fenced it,” and removed stones [heathen nations] that would hinder the growth of His “vineyard,” and chose the best vines (5:2). He built a “watchtower” (the Temple) in the midst (5:2c).

The LORD’s Disappointments (5:2-4)

Yet, when the LORD inspected His people (“vineyard”), He found “wild grapes” in the midst (5:2). What were the wild grapes? The sins of the people, for they had broken His covenant, and were guilty of idolatry, and all manner of wickedness (5:3-4).

Two Consequences that Befall a Nation That Rejects God (5:5-7)

The first consequence that befell Judah was God’s promise to remove His loving, providential care of His people (“take away the hedge…break down the wall” – 5:5).

The LORD promised He would eliminate the nation’s economic prosperity, and “lay it waste” (5:6). Judah would become like an untended vineyard, overgrown with “briers and thorns” (5:6). Leaving no doubt the prophet was warning Israel and Judah the judgment that would befall those nations, we read: “7For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel, And the men of Judah his pleasant plant: And he looked for judgment, but behold oppression; For righteousness, but behold a cry” (5:7).

Six Woes: Elijah’s Warning of God’s Judgment (5:8-23)

Among the sins that provoked God’s wrath, notice six that demanded His judgment. The wealthy were guilty of greed and covetous, and exploited the people (5:8-10). God declared their greed would be rewarded with desolation (5:9), and their investments (“vineyard”) would be unprofitable (5:10).

The people were guilty of pursuing a narcissistic, drunken lifestyle. They would rise  “early in the morning, that they may follow strong drink,” and continue until night (5:11). Their drunken feasts were accompanied by seductive music, so that they gave no thought of the LORD and His providences (5:12).

They were proud, and deceived “with cords of vanity” (5:18), they taunted the LORD (5:19). Having rejected God’s Law and Commandments, they refused moral absolutes. Lacking spiritual discernment, they called “evil good, and good evil; That put darkness for light, and light for darkness; That put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!” (5:20).

They were arrogant and conceited, “wise in their own eyes” (5:21). They perverted justice, and exploited the innocent and weak, and would also “justify the wicked for reward [bribes] (5:23).

Warning: God’s Judgment is Coming (5:24-25)

The “wild grapes” of Israel had provoked God’s judgment, and the fruit of that nation was rebellion, idolatry, and immorality. The leaders did not fear the judgment of God, and Isaiah warned, the LORD had “stretched forth his hand against them, and hath smitten them” (5:25).

The Instruments of God’s Judgment (5:26-30)

Though not named here, Isaiah warned, the LORD would bring against Israel and Judah enemies who would come swiftly, and show the people no mercy. Their adversaries would not tire (5:27), and like the roar of young lions, they would thirst for blood (5:29). The armies of their enemies would sweep over the land like the waters of a storm (5:30).

Closing thoughts – The Assyrians were the first to come, and they took Israel (the northern ten tribes) captive (2 Kings 17:1-41). After Assyria, Nebuchadnezzar led his army against Judah, and destroyed Jerusalem and the Temple, and took the people captive (2 Kings 25:1-30).

Woe to a nation and people who reject God’s Law and Commandments!

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

“The Sins and Signs of a Failing Nation and a Dying Culture” – part 2 (Isaiah 3)

Scripture reading – Isaiah 2; Isaiah 3

This is the second of two devotionals for today’s Scripture reading. The focus is Isaiah 3.

The Bible is filled with examples of godly men who did not have the luxury of ignoring the wickedness and perversity of their leaders or nation. Zechariah was stoned to death when he condemned the sins of Judah and her king (2 Chronicles 24). God commanded Jonah to go to Nineveh and warn that wicked nation, except they repent the city would be destroyed. John the Baptist lost his head when he dared confront the wickedness and adultery of King Herod. And so, we come to Isaiah, whom God called to assail the wickedness of Judah and her kings.

The Removal of “the Stay and the Staff” (3:1-4)

A study of history reveals the rise and fall of nations follows the pattern of sin and wickedness we find in Isaiah 3.  We read, “1For, behold, the Lord, the Lord of hosts, Doth take away from Jerusalem and from Judah the stay and the staff” (3:1).

Interpreting this verse in context, you find God was removing from Judah that nation’s leaders. The “stay” (masculine form, meaning support or protector) represented that nation’s loss of “manly men,” who had been strong leaders in Judah. The removal of the “staff” (feminine form, meaning a support), meant the nation would have a void of godly, influential women (3:1).

Judah’s rebellion against God invited His judgment, and the losses are enumerated in Isaiah 3.

There would be a shortage of bread and water (“the whole stay of bread, and the whole stay of water” (3:1). The nation would want for male leaders, men of integrity described as, “the mighty man, and the man of war, the judge, and the prophet, and the prudent, and the ancient” (3:2).

A second tier of leadership, the backbone of a nation, would be lost. There would be no “captain of fifty [lower military officers], and the honourable man [men of integrity], and the counseller [wise men], and the cunning artificer [skilled workers; i.e., carpenters, mechanics], and the eloquent orator [persuasive speakers]” (3:4)

Judah Turned to Weak, Incompetent Men for Leaders (3:4-6)

With a void of spiritual, “manly men” leaders (3:7-9), the people turned to foolish, inexperienced leaders, dominated by brazen women (3:12, 16-23). The people chose “children [weak] to be their princes, and babes [immature] shall rule [have dominion or power] over them (3:4). With weak, inexperienced, unprincipled leaders, Judah became a lawless, oppressed society (3:5). Those weak leaders were proud and emboldened “against the ancient [elderly]” (3:5), and “base [without a moral compass] against the honourable [men of rank]” (3:5).

How did those weak, spineless, effeminate leaders come to be in authority? They were not chosen because of their character, but because of their influence (having acquired wealth by inheritance, 3:6).

Judah Turned to Domineering Women for Leaders (3:12, 16-23)

Instead of nurturing and protecting the youth of the nation, women diminished their femininity, and became worse brutes than men (3:12 – “women rule over them…they which lead thee cause thee to err, And destroy the way of thy paths”). The women of the nation, identified as “the daughters of Zion,” were proud and immodest (3:16), haughty, and flirtatious with “wanton [painted] eyes” (3:16).

Closing thoughtsLike most nations that fail, Judah was destroyed, not from an enemy without, but from an enemy within.

What becomes of a nation that chooses weak men, and proud women to lead? The strong women would be afflicted with disease (3:17). They would be reduced to the poverty of a household slave (3:18-24). Their fine jewelry (3:18-21), and costly apparel would be taken (3:22-23), and their well-groomed hair would be replaced by baldness (3:24).

Yet, there was still hope. Though the majority of Judah had turned to wickedness, not all were faithless. God promised He would not forget the righteous, and would avenge His people (3:10-24, 25-26).

Do the signs of a dying nation sound familiar?

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Cursed Be the Man Who Usurps God’s Authority (2 Kings 15; 2 Chronicles 26)

Scripture Reading – 2 Kings 15; 2 Chronicles 26

Continuing our chronological study of the Scriptures, we return to 2 Kings 15 and 2 Chronicles 26, parallel passages of the same historical events. Though the names of kings might be confusing and their deeds soon forgotten, what is important is that we take from our study of the Scriptures an insight into the ways of the LORD, and His sovereign rule in the affairs of men and nations.

2 Kings 15 – Kings rise and fall, but the reign of the LORD endures forever.

His father having been assassinated in a conspiracy (2 Kings 14:19), Azariah (also known as Uzziah in 2 Kings 15 and 2 Chronicles 26) became king of Judah.  He was only sixteen years old when he ascended to Judah’s throne, and would reign as king fifty-two years (15:1-2).

2 Kings 15:5 states with no explanation that Azariah (i.e. Uzziah), was smitten with leprosy by the LORD and was forced to live in a “several” [separate] house from the palace (2 Kings 15:5a). The king’s son, Jotham, handled the administrative matters of the palace, “judging the people of the land” (2 Kings 15:5b).

To understand the cause for the king’s leprosy (which in the Scriptures is a symbol of the dreadfulness of sin), we turn to 2 Chronicles 26.

2 Chronicles 26 – Stricken with Leprosy for Usurping the Priesthood

King Uzziah’s (i.e., Azariah in 2 Kings 15) remarkable achievements are recorded in 2 Chronicles 26, which also gives us the cause for his successes: “He sought God in the days of Zechariah [the high priest], who had understanding in the visions of God: and as long as he [Uzziah] sought the LORD, God made him to prosper” (2 Chronicles 26:5).

Uzziah had been a successful warrior (26:6-8), for “God helped him…and his name spread abroad” (26:7-8). He had reinforced the fortification of Jerusalem, and to secure the land he “built towers in the desert, and digged wells” (essential in the dry, arid wilderness, 26:10). I especially admire the mention of Uzziah’s heart for the agrarian way of life, for we read, “he loved husbandry” (i.e., he loved to farm, (26:10).

Yet, this king with a farmer’s heart, was also a gifted administrator, who numbered and ordered his army, providing for his soldiers the necessary implements for war (26:11-15). Perhaps he was also a gifted engineer, and strategist, for he is said to have “made in Jerusalem engines, invented by cunning men, to be on the towers and upon the bulwarks, to shoot arrows and great stones withal” (26:15a). What those “engines” of war were, is a matter of speculation, but Uzziah achieved the admiration of his friends and foes (26:15b).

Tragically, when he was at the pinnacle of success in his 52-year reign over Judah, we read, “But when he [Uzziah; i.e. Azariah] was strong, his heart was lifted up to his destruction: for he transgressed against the LORD his God, and went into the temple of the LORD to burn incense upon the altar of incense” (2 Chronicles 26:16).

Why did the LORD afflict King Uzziah (i.e., Azariah) with leprosy, a dreaded disease that would follow him to his grave?

Uzziah was afflicted with a malady more dreaded than leprosy– PRIDE (26:16). Forgetting his successes had come because of the LORD’s blessings, Uzziah’s “heart was lifted up to his destruction” (26:16), and he foolishly usurped the role of the priest and entered “the temple of the LORD to burn incense upon the altar of incense” (26:16; Numbers 16:40; 18:7).

Bloated with pride from his achievements, the king treaded upon ground God had reserved for the priesthood.

The chief priest Azariah and eighty priests with him, confronted Uzziah (26:17-18). Rather than humble himself and confess his sin, the king was enraged and the LORD immediately struck him with leprosy which evidenced on his forehead (26:19). The law regarding leprosy demanded a leper be put out from the living (Leviticus 13:45-46) to avoid the spread, and seeing the blight on the king’s face, the priests expelled Uzziah from the Temple, even as he sought to flee (26:20).

As a leper, Uzziah lived the rest of his life in a separate house from the palace. Because he was a leper, he was not buried in a royal tomb, but was instead buried in a field near the place where kings were buried.

Closing thoughts – What a tragedy! The legacy of the great king gave testimony of his skill as a warrior, builder, administrator, but sadly—tainted as a leper. Uzziah’s (i.e., Azariah) life, in spite of his achievements, read simply, “He [was] a leper” (26:23).

I wonder what counsel Uzziah might offer, if given an opportunity to counsel a 21st century believer? Perhaps he would warn:

Sinful pride, and one’s failure to honor the Lord and keep His Commandments, will not only risk your legacy, but your life.

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

History is “HIS-Story” (2 Kings 13; 2 Kings 14)

Scripture reading – 2 Kings 13; 2 Kings 14

We are in the midst of the era of the kings in Israel and Judah. I encourage you to not allow yourself to become frustrated, attempting to retain the names of all the kings. What is important is to remember that history is “His-Story,” and a testament to the sovereignty and providence of the LORD.

2 Kings 13

The northern ten tribes known as Israel, continued in sin, following the “sins of Jeroboam” who had made two golden calves and “made Israel to sin” (13:2). The sins of the kings of Israel, and their evil influence on the people, was a continual provocation of God’s wrath (13:3). Fulfilling Elisha’s prophecy, Hazael king of Syria, and his son Benhadad, continually oppressed Israel (13:4). Yet, when the LORD delivered the people from their enemies, Israel would turn back to their sins and idolatry (13:5-6). Joash (also named Jehoash) succeeded his father Jehoahaz, and he followed in the sins of his father (13:8-13)

The Death of Elisha, God’s Prophet (13:14-21)

We find Elisha, God’s prophet in Israel and the successor of the prophet Elijah, terminally ill (13:14). Although he had often opposed the kings of Israel, king Joash, respected the prophet and came to his bedside and “wept over his face, and said, O my father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof” (13:14).

Elisha’s homegoing was not as dramatic as Elijah’s (for he had been taken up to heaven in a fiery chariot), nevertheless, he was honored by the visit of the king and he offered Joash two symbolic and prophetic blessings (13:15-19). The first, Elisha asked Joash to shoot an arrow out the window to the east, and he prophesied the LORD would deliver Israel from Syria (13:16-17). The second symbol, Elisha commanded the king to strike the floor with arrows, which Joash obeyed and struck the floor three times (13:18). The dying prophet was suddenly indignant, for he said had Joash struck the floor more than three times he would have been assured that Syria would be destroyed (13:19).

A miracle followed Elisha’s death and burial, for the body of another man was cast into his grave, and touching the bones of the prophet, was raised from the dead (13:20-21).

2 Kings 13 concluded with a reminder, though Israel had disobeyed the LORD, and broke covenant with Him, God never forgot His “his covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and would not destroy them, neither cast he them from his presence as yet” (13:23).

2 Kings 14

This chapter records a succession of kings and their sons who ruled over Judah and Israel. Amaziah, the son of Joash, became king of Judah (14:1-2), and “he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, yet not like David his father: he did according to all things as Joash his father did” (14:3). King David, though not a perfect man, was a man whom God said was “a man after mine own heart” (Acts 13:22). Amaziah served the LORD much of his life, but in his last years forsook the LORD, His law, and commandments.

Soon after becoming king, Amaziah sought a covenant of peace with Jehoash the king of Israel; however, that wicked king rose up against Judah, attacked Jerusalem, and broke down a section of the wall of the city. He also took away “all the gold and silver, and all the vessels that were found in the house of the Lord, and in the treasures of the king’s house, and hostages, and returned to Samaria” (14:14).

A second king named Jeroboam, probably named after the founding king of the northern ten tribes, became king of Israel in 2 Kings 14:23, and he continued in the idolatry that had been established by his namesake (14:24).

Our Scripture reading concludes reminding us of the grave consequences Israel suffered as a nation for her sins. Consider verse 26: “For the Lord saw the affliction of Israel, that it was very bitter: for there was not any shut up, nor any left, nor any helper for Israel” (14:26). Yet the Lord had compassion for Israel and remembered them, for “…the Lord said not that he would blot out the name of Israel from under heaven; but he saved them by the hand of Jeroboam the son of Joash” (14.27).

The pride and arrogance of Israel’s kings, and the idolatry and wickedness of the people, are drawing to a close. What is true of a man, is also true of a nation, for,  “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18). Yet, “it is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness” (Lamentations 3:22, 23).

Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

You Are Invited to Pastor Smith’s Study of Proverbs: An Exposition of “Uncommon Common Sense”

Pastor Smith continues his verse-by-verse study of the Proverbs of Solomon, this Wednesday, January 12, 6:30 pm. 

The focus of this week’s study is Proverbs 19:15-29 and will be broadcast live on http://www.DailyTestify.com, and http://www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.
Student notes are available by sending your request to HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com. Requests must be received by 4:00pm today.

(Please note a weekly time of prayer begins at 6:15, but will not be broadcast.)

With the heart of a shepherd,
Travis D. Smith
Senior Pastor
Copyright © 2022 – Travis D. Smith

Friendly Reminder: Pastor Smith is returning to his series, A Study and Exposition of “Uncommon Common Sense”

Pastor Smith is returning to his verse-by-verse study of the Proverbs of Solomon, this Wednesday, January 5, 6:30 pm. 

This week’s study begins with Proverbs 19 and will be broadcast live on DailyTestify.com, and http://www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.
Student notes are available by sending your request to HeartofAShepherdInc@gmail.com. Requests must be received by 4:00pm today.
(Please note a weekly time of prayer begins at 6:15, but will not be broadcast.)
With the heart of a shepherd,
Travis D. Smith
Senior Pastor
Copyright © 2021 – Travis D. Smith