Category Archives: Prayer

Warning: What You Promise the LORD, Is the LORD’S!” (Leviticus 26-27)

Devotional reading assignment – Leviticus 26-27

Inviting the nation to obey His laws and keep His commands (26:3), the Lord promised to bless the land and make it fruitful (26:4-10).  Reminding Israel His promise of blessings was conditioned on their obedience, the LORD warned His judgments for their sin and disobedience will be seven times greater (26:18, 21, 24, 28).

Why “seven times” greater?

Because one dare not trifle with the LORD’S laws and commandments nor despise His grace. Disobey His law and reject His favor, and you not only face the consequences of sin, but the greater judgment for rejecting His grace (26:25-39). Having heard and received the commandments, the people of that generation were warned to not trifle with the LORD, but to obey Him.

The LORD warned Israel and it would come to pass…reject His law and commandments and a host of judgments would befall the nation: Pestilence (26:25), famine (26:26), cannibalism (“eat the flesh of your sons, and the flesh of your daughters” – 26:27-29), cities wasted, places of worship abandoned (26:31), and exile from the land (26:33-39).

Leviticus 27 concludes our study of Leviticus and reminds us the LORD holds sacred the vows we make to Him (27:1-2). Whether young or old, a covenant vow to the LORD is a serious and sacred matter (27:3-8).

A full discussion regarding the LORD’S tithe is found in Leviticus 27:9-34.

The LORD required a tenth of the livestock, both clean and unclean, be brought to the sanctuary (27:9-13).  The clean was dedicated to the LORD while the value of an unclean beast was established and sold to support the sanctuary (27:11-12).

An important lesson is the matter of an owner redeeming or purchasing that which he had dedicated to the LORD but desired to retain.

To purchase what one dedicated to the LORD (examples include beasts, a house, crops of a field) required a priest establish its monetary value. For an owner to claim what he dedicated to the LORD required paying not only its value, but one-fifth part more to redeem (27:13, 15, 19).

The summary of this “value plus one-fifth more” is expressed in this:

Leviticus 27:30-31 – “30  And all the tithe of the land, whether of the seed of the land, or of the fruit of the tree, is the LORD’S: it is holy unto the LORD. 31  And if a man will at all redeem ought of his tithes, he shall add thereto the fifth part thereof.”

The lesson for Israel was, whatever one dedicates to the LORD is sacred and His alone.

Refuse to give the LORD His part and you forfeit His blessing. If you change your heart and desire to keep what you have dedicated to the LORD, He requires not only its value, but also one-fifth more.

What about you, have you kept your vows to the LORD?

Have you forgotten the vows you made to Him, whether publicly or privately? Do you remember the decision you made to surrender your life to Him? Could your struggles be related to this principle; your failure to fully give all you have vowed to the LORD?

Ecclesiastes 5:4-54  When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed. 5  Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay.

Remember, what you vow to the LORD He will not forget!

Romans 12:1-21  I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. 2  And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Sinning against another is a sin against God! (Leviticus 5-7)

Daily reading assignment – Leviticus 5-7

Today’s study in the book of Leviticus continues its exposition and explanation of the sacrifices required for sin; each reminding us sin is an offense against the LORD and “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23).

Various sins are identified in Leviticus 5 and the prerequisite sacrifice for each sin. Leviticus 5:1 speaks to the sin of failing to speak truth and thus concealing the sin and crime of another (perhaps in a judicial sense where one is called to testify as a witness).  Similar to our own court system where one is asked to swear to “tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.”

Cleanliness is urged and contact with the carcass of a dead beast was forbidden under the Law. Unlike ancient Israel, today we understand the health risks of being defiled (infected) by a dead animal and why the LORD forbade it (5:2-3).

Inconsiderate, thoughtless words and conversation is also condemned and sacrifices were required of all who swore and spoke with haste (5:4-13).

The Trespass Offerings is the subject of Leviticus 5:14-6:7. You will notice a principle of “restitution plus one-fifth.” Why?

Saying “I’m sorry” is not enough in God’s perfect justice system.

The first sin demanding a trespass offering plus “one-fifth” is spiritual misappropriation: A sinner taking that which another dedicated to the Lord.

For instance: A priest might fall prey to embezzling…taking for himself what another had offered as a sacrifice.  Such a sin demanded not only restitution, but also giving one-fifth more above what was taken (5:14-16).

Other sins demanding sacrifice and restitution were lying and dishonesty (6:1-2), finding another’s property, but concealing the fact (6:3), and violently cheating one of his property.  All sins committed with foreknowledge required not only sacrifice, but also restitution above what was pilfered (6:4). Similar to an assessment of loss and damages in the American Judicial System.

Laws concerning burnt offerings are expressed in Leviticus 6:8-13.  Reminding us the believer is to be ever in a spirit of prayer, we read: “The fire shall ever be burning upon the altar; it shall never go out” (6:13)

Leviticus 7 – The “trespass offering” and the “peace offering”

The “peace offering” served as a sacrifice of thanksgiving for God’s grace and provision (Leviticus 7:11-21).  The sacrifice of oxen or cattle is prescribed accompanied by offerings of “unleavened cakes…unleavened wafers…and cakes mingled with oil, of fine flour, fired” (Leviticus 7:12).  The portions of the “peace offering” not consumed by the fire were given to the priests for their consumption.

Remembering the blood was a testament to the punishment of sin, the “fat of the beast” and “blood” portions of the offerings were not to be eaten (Leviticus 7:22-27). Blood was not to be consumed because it was the means and object of atonement (Leviticus 17:11; Hebrews 9:22).

Consuming the “fat of the beast” or the “blood” necessitated a sinner “be cut off from his people” (7:25, 27); a punishment that could extend so far as death.

What have we learned?

Sinning against someone requires not only sincere confession, but “restitution plus” may be necessary to make them whole and restore fellowship.

Have you sinned against someone and not sought forgiveness?  Without confession and restitution for the harm you have caused, your broken fellowship may follow you to your grave.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Who Is On the LORD’S Side? (Exodus 30-32)

Scripture Reading Assignment – Exodus 30-32

Let’s begin today’s devotional commentary with a spiritual truth found in Exodus 30 and then see it identified in practice.

Lesson: That which is holy is never to be treated as common! (30:35-38)

Continuing our study of Exodus, we find Moses on Mount Sinai communing with the LORD who instructs His servant regarding the preparations for daily worship (Exodus 30:1-10), sacrificial offerings (30:11-16), and the anointing oil and spices exclusive for use in the tabernacle and never to be duplicated for any other use (30:17-37).

In Exodus 31 the LORD chose skilled artisans and laborers to construct the furniture and various utensils to be used in the tabernacle (31:1-11). Think about it: Even what some call “blue collar workers”, were chosen and called by the LORD to serve Him!

Moses was to remind Israel to set aside one day, the Sabbath, to rest and worship Him (31:12-17). Finally, the LORD gave him two tablets, tables of stone, on which He inscribed His covenant with Israel (31:18).

Exodus 32 – Rebellion in the Camp

Moses ascended Mount Sinai in Exodus 24 and had been apart from the people for forty days and nights (Exodus 24:18).

In Moses’ absence, the hearts of the people had turned away from the LORD, His commandments, and covenant with Israel.  The people rebelled and turning to the ways of Egypt, demanded Aaron cast a golden calf for them to worship (Exodus 32:1-6).

Angered by the breach of His covenant, the LORD vowed to judge the nation in His wrath (Exodus 32:7-10).  Moses, however, interceded for the people, reminding the LORD of His covenant promises and testimony among the heathen nations (Exodus 32:11-14).

Descending the mount with the tablets of stone inscribed by the LORD, Moses encountered Joshua who feared the noise below was that of war (32:15-17).  The sight of the golden calf, the frenzy and wickedness of idol worship, and the nakedness of the people so incensed Moses “he cast the tables out of his hands, and brake them beneath the mount” (32:19).

Confronting his brother Aaron, Moses took up the LORD’s righteous cause and demanded he account for the wickedness of the people. Aaron foolishly defended his failure to face the idolatrous demands of the people and withstand them (32:20-24).  Turning from Aaron, Moses challenged the “sons of Levi,” the priestly tribe, “Who is on the LORD’S side?” (32:26).

Moses charged the faithful, “Put every man his sword by his side…and slay every man his brother…and every man his neighbor…and there fell of the people that day about three thousand men” (32:27-28). Moses then ascended the mount and interceded for Israel (32:30-35).

Permit me to close with an observation: We recognize Aaron’s gross failure as a spiritual leader.  He failed the LORD out of a desire to please and appease the people…and three thousand souls perished.

I wonder how many attend churches whose worship is led by men more concerned with what the people want than they are with what the LORD demands…a Holy People.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Faith is the Victory! (Exodus 13-15)

Daily reading assignment: Exodus 13-15

The observance of the Passover having been established (12:1-28, 43-51), the people were reminded the difference between the Israelite and Egyptian households was the blood of the lamb Israel applied to the doorposts of their homes. When the LORD saw the blood, He passed over their homes and spared the firstborn. The LORD commanded that the Passover, sacrificing a spotless lamb and eating unleavened bread, would serve as a perpetual memorial, a lasting testimony of when He saved the firstborn of Israel (13:1-3, 6-16).

Four hundred years earlier and believing God’s promise to deliver His people out of bondage, Joseph had requested his bones be taken out of Egypt and buried with his father when the people returned to Canaan (13:17-19).

The LORD comforted the people with a visible testimony of His presence, shadowing Israel with a cloud by day and a pillar of fire by night (13:20-22).

In spite of the ten plagues he and Egypt had suffered, Pharaoh set his heart to pursue Israel that he might once again enslave the people (14:1-9).  Israel, encamping on the shores of the Red Sea, saw Pharaoh’s army approaching in the distance and the people began murmuring against Moses (14:10-12) who stilled the hearts of the people with the assurance the LORD was with them (14:13-14).

The LORD parted the waters of the Red Sea, allowing Israel to cross over on dry ground (14:15-22), and delayed Pharaoh’s army by setting a cloud of darkness over the Egyptians.  When Israel was safe on the far shore, the LORD lifted the cloud and Pharaoh foolishly pursued Israel into the midst of the waters until the LORD brought them down upon his army (14:23-31).

With Israel securely on the other side of the Red Sea, Moses led the people in a song celebrating the Lord’s salvation and Israel’s deliverance from Pharaoh (15:1-21).

Sadly, reminding us the best of men are sinners at best; a murmuring and discontentment soon arose among the people that began a pattern of sin Israel will follow throughout their sojourn in the wilderness (15:22-27).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Gone, but Not Forgotten! (Exodus 4-6)

Daily reading assignment: Exodus 4-6

The LORD warned Moses, “I am sure that the king of Egypt will not let you go, no, not by a mighty hand” (Exodus 3:19).

The LORD called Moses to a mission that would be fraught with danger and disappointments.  Forty years in the wilderness had not erased the memories of Egypt and Moses did not relish for himself the hardships suffered by his brethren. Certainly, Moses dreaded the thought of returning to Pharaoh’s court.

God answered Moses’ objections with signs and demonstrations of His power (4:1-9).

When Moses confessed he lacked the skill to speak in the Egyptian tongue, God answered, “Is not Aaron the Levite thy brother? I know that he can speak well… 15  And thou shalt speak unto him, and put words in his mouth: and I will be with thy mouth, and with his mouth, and will teach you what ye shall do. 16  And he shall be thy spokesman unto the people: and he shall be, even he shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God” (Exodus 4:14-16).

Led by the LORD, Aaron, the elder brother of Moses departed Egypt (4:27) to be reunited with his brother forty years after he fled to the wilderness.  Moses shared with Aaron the LORD’S call for him to lead Israel out of bondage (Exodus 4:28-31).

Moses’ first confrontations with Pharaoh are recorded in Exodus 5:1-7:13.

Little time passed before Moses and Aaron had an audience with Pharaoh (Exodus 5:1) and demanded the Hebrews be allowed a three-day journey into the wilderness to worship and offer sacrifices to their God (5:3).  The first clash of wills between Pharaoh and Moses is recorded in Exodus 5:1-6:27 and the second follows in Exodus 6:28-7:13.

Four centuries of slavery have passed, but the LORD has not forsaken His people or forgotten His covenant with Israel (Exodus 6:1-5). The LORD renewed His covenant with the nation, reminding the people He was with them as He was with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (6:6-8).

Why did the Lord bring ten plagues upon Egypt? Why not overthrow Pharaoh and deliver Israel out of bondage? 

Many explanations come to mind, but I will limit myself to two. The first; the Lord was preparing Moses to move from being a shepherd of sheep to serving as the leader of Israel. Each plague incensed Pharaoh and weakened Egypt, but magnified Moses in the eyes of the people. The second; the plagues increased the Hebrews’ faith in God and demonstrated He was the LORD and God of creation.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

We Are Never Alone…God is With Us (Genesis 41-42)

Daily reading assignment: Genesis 41-42

Now two years passed before the butler gave any thought to Joseph, the man who comforted and interpreted his dream in prison (41:1a).  In God’s time, Pharaoh’s sleep was disturbed by dreams (41:1-8) that he was moved to seek assistance in interpreting his foreboding of great trials Egypt would soon face. The stage was set for the butler to remember Joseph and commend him to Pharaoh a man as a man who could interpret dreams (41:9-32).

Interpreting the king’s dreams, Pharaoh rewarded Joseph’s faithfulness appointing him to serve over Egypt, second only to himself (41:33-44).  Only thirty years old when he was promoted (41:46), Joseph was entrusted with the granaries of Egypt as the nation prepared for seven years of famine that would follow seven years of plenty (41:45-57).

Genesis 41 closes with the revelation; “all countries came into Egypt to Joseph for to buy corn; because that the famine was so sore in all lands” (41:57).

God had providentially set the stage for Joseph’s brothers, forced by famine in their own land, to come to Egypt seeking food for their households.

Joseph recognized his brethren; however, none of them suspected the Egyptian ruler to whom they bowed was their brother Joseph and their fate now rest in the hands of one they had despised and sold into slavery (42:1-20).  Joseph concealed his identity and repressed the emotions that swelled up in his soul as he remembered the dreams of his youth now fulfilled in his brothers bowing before him (42:9a; 37:6-9).

Joseph questioned his brethren; not only to learn the fate of his father Jacob and brother Benjamin, but also to discern whether his brothers had repented of their sins against him (42:10-19).

Overhearing their remorse (42:20-23), God confirmed in Joseph’s heart that the passing years had changed his brothers’ hearts toward him. Rather than bitterness and revenge, we read Joseph turned himself about from them, and wept” (42:24).

Choosing to not disclose his identity, Joseph set in motion a plan (42:25-28) that will ultimately conclude with Benjamin, Joseph’s younger brother, being transported to Egypt (42:29-38).

Joseph’s faith has sustained him through bleak times…from the sorrow of being rejected by his brethren, through being falsely accused and imprisoned…we have observed in Joseph’s life what King David will one day confirm, As for God, his way is perfect: the word of the LORD is tried: he is a buckler to all those that trust in him” (Psalm 18:30).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

A Lesson in LAW and GRACE (Genesis 22-24)

Daily reading assignment: Genesis 22-24

Genesis 22 puts the faith of Abraham to the test as God proves his faith by commanding him to sacrifice Isaac, the son of God’s covenant promise.  Isaac’s question, “Where is the Lamb?” (22:7) is answered 2,000 years later when John the Baptist says concerning Jesus, “Behold the Lamb” (John 1:29, 36).

Reminding us God’s people are sojourners in this world of sin, we read, “Sarah was an hundred and seven and twenty years old: these were the years of the life of Sarah. 2  And Sarah died in Kirjatharba; the same is Hebron in the land of Canaan: and Abraham came to mourn for Sarah, and to weep for her” (Genesis 23:1-2).

I close this historical crossroads in Abraham’s life inviting you to consider spiritual lessons concerning Law and Grace illustrated in the births of Ishmael and Isaac (Galatians 4:21-31). 

Ishmael, born a slave of a slave woman, was the fruit of Abraham’s effort to have a son and heir apart from God (Galatians 4:22a, 23a).   Isaac, born a free man of a free woman, was the son of promise whose birth was miraculous and the work of God (Galatians 4:22b, 23b).

The mothers, Hagar and Sarah, represent two covenants: Hagar, the LAW, the covenant between God and man (Galatians 4:24-25) reminding us the impossibility of man fulfilling the demands of the Law (Romans 3:19-20).  Sarah, represents God’s covenant of GRACE, His provision and unmerited favor (Galatians 4:26-27) extended to man.

Ishmael’s birth is a tragic reminder of man attempting in his own efforts to do and fulfill what only God can do.  Isaac’s birth, fulfilling God’s covenant promise to Abraham and Sarah, is a portrait of GRACE, God doing what only He could do.

My friend, that is why salvation is not by works that merit God’s favor, but is an act of God’s grace alone.

Ephesians 2:8-9 – “For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: 9 Not of works, lest any man should boast.”

My theme for Genesis 24 is “Here Comes the Bride”.   Following the death of his beloved Sarah (23:1-2), Abraham was burdened that Isaac, his son and heir of God’s covenant promises, should have a fitting wife.

Fearing Isaac might be tempted to take a wife of the heathen tribes that dwelled in Canaan, Abraham determined to send his “eldest servant”  (24:2-4) to his kindred residing in “Ur of the Chaldees” (11:27-31).  Reflecting the faith of his master, Abraham’s servant prayed for the LORD to make His will clear in choosing the young woman who would become Isaac’s wife  (24:12-14).

God heard and answered the servant’s prayer even as he was praying (24:15-26).  In a prayer of praise that should comfort all who call upon and desire the will of the LORD, the servant prayed, I being in the way, the LORD led me to the house of my master’s brethren” (24:27).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith