Category Archives: Second Coming of Christ

The Wicked Know No Shame (Zephaniah 1-3)

Scripture reading – Zephaniah 1-3

Our chronological reading of the Scriptures brings us to Zephaniah, a minor prophet who ministered in Judah during the reign of King Josiah (1:1).

Zephaniah 1 – A prophecy of imminent judgment.

Zephaniah was tasked with pronouncing God’s judgment on His people in frightening and graphic details. He warned Judah, “I will utterly consume all things from off the land, saith the LORD” (1:2). Nothing would be spared the wrath of the LORD: “I will consume man and beast… fowls of the heaven, and the fishes of the sea…Judah…all the inhabitants of Jerusalem” (1:3-4).

“The Day of the Lord” is an oft repeated phrase in Zephaniah 1 and was a warning of the day of God’s vengeance (1:7, 8, 14, 18).

Remember the prophecies often have an immediate and future application. In the immediate, the “day of the LORD” was the day of God’s judgment against Judah when Babylon would destroy Jerusalem and the Temple. In the prophetic application, the “day of the LORD” is still future and will be fulfilled in the Second Coming of Christ when He comes in judgment.

Zephaniah 1:10 mentions “the noise of a cry from the fish gate…and a great crashing from the hills.” The fish gate was the gate that led to the fish market, but you may wonder why is this important. The answer is a historical fact: King Nebuchadnezzar passed through the fish gate when Babylon conquered Jerusalem! The destruction of the city and the captivity of the people would be so thorough that it was likened to searching out every crevice of the city with candles (1:12a).

The people lived in denial saying, “The LORD will not do good, neither will he do evil” (1:12b). Even the strongest men of Judah would cry out on the day of God’s judgment (1:13). How terrible is the day of God’s final judgment?

Zephaniah 1:15 – “That day is a day of wrath, a day of trouble and distress, a day of wasteness and desolation, a day of darkness and gloominess, a day of clouds and thick darkness.”

Zephaniah 2 – An Exhortation to Repent

Remembering the LORD is longsuffering, we are not surprised to read that the prophet Zephaniah called upon Judah to repent and, “seek…the LORD, all ye meek of the earth…seek righteousness, seek meekness: it may be ye shall be hid in the day of the LORD’S anger” (2:3).

Because of their wickedness, Zephaniah prophesied the judgment of God against four major Philistine cities, Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, and Ekron” (2:4). The Moabites and Ammonites would fall to Babylon as divine punishment for their abuses of Israel (2:8-11). The Ethiopians (of the lineage of Cush whose land was southeast of Egypt on the continent of Africa) would be slain (2:12). Assyria and its great capital city, Nineveh, would be utterly destroyed by Babylon. The destruction of Nineveh so complete it would be uninhabitable, a wasteland and a haven for wild beasts (2:13-15).

Zephaniah 3 – The Necessity of Divine Judgment Against Jerusalem

Zephaniah laid out the case regarding the wickedness of Jerusalem that demanded God’s judgment (3:1-4). That city had become “filthy and polluted,” and was a violent city (3:1). Her civil leaders (princes and judges) were like “roaring lions…wolves” that gnaw the bones of the poor and helpless (3:1). Her spiritual leaders (prophets and priests) were “treacherous” and violent (3:4).

Zephaniah assured the people of Judah, the LORD was just and He would not “do iniquity…He brings His judgment to light, he faileth not; but the unjust knoweth no shame” (3:5).

What an appalling statement! Innocence was lost. Moral purity disdained. The politicians and religious leaders were so given to sin and wickedness that they felt no shame! Though their wickedness was widely known, they felt no sense of humiliation. In spite of God’s judgment of other nations’ sins, Judah had failed to be moved to repent of her sins (3:6-7).

Zephaniah’s ministry closed with not only a warning of the day when God would gather the nations of the earth to be judged (3:8), but also when He will gather the remnant of Israel from all nations who will call upon and serve Him (3:9).

In that day, the day of the LORD, sin, shame, and pride will be removed (3:11-14), God’s people will rejoice for the LORD is King (3:14-17), and the people will be restored to the LORD who will dwell in the midst (3:18-20).

What a glorious day that will be!

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“We are the Clay, and Thou Our Potter” (Isaiah 64-66)

Scripture Reading – Isaiah 64-66

Today’s Scripture reading is Isaiah 64-66; however, today’s devotional commentary will focus on the closing verses of Isaiah 63 and Isaiah 64.

Isaiah 63

To put Isaiah 64 in context, I invite you to look back to Isaiah 63, the chapter preceding today’s devotion, and consider a series of cries Isaiah made to the LORD for Israel and Judah (63:15-19).

Isaiah petitioned the LORD that He would show mercy and compassion to His people (63:15b). He reminded God that He alone was the Father and Redeemer of Israel. (63:16).  The prophet prayed for the LORD to return and help His people (63:17b), and reminded Him that He had chosen Israel to be a holy people, but their enemies had destroyed the Temple (63:18, a future event).  Though alienated from God by their sins, the people reminded the LORD, “We are thine” (63:19).

Isaiah 64 – Three Cries to the LORD

We consider three cries to the LORD that are recorded in Isaiah 64. The first was a cry for the LORD to save His people from their adversaries (64:1-4). In the immediate, the enemy who would destroy Jerusalem and the Temple would be Babylon. However, this is also a far-reaching prophecy that is still future. The description of “when the melting fire burneth, the fire causeth the waters to boil” (64:2) is a depiction of the Second Coming of Christ at the climax of the Battle of Armageddon (Revelation 21:11-19).

Isaiah prayed for the LORD to come and execute judgment (64:3) and prove He alone is God, and He helps those who wait on His coming (64:4).

The second cry was one of confession (64:5b-8). Isaiah confessed the universality of man’s sin.

Without exception, we are all sinners by birth (64:5) and the problem of sin is universal. Isaiah confessed, “we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses [our best attempt at keeping the law and commandments falls short] are as filthy rags [bloody, soiled rags]” (64:6).

Isaiah observed that the hearts of the people were so hardened by sin that there was “none that calleth upon thy name, that stirreth up himself to take hold of thee” (64:7a). The LORD Who is Holy and will not look upon sin, had turned his face (his blessings and mercies) from the people and they were consumed and enslaved by their wickedness (64:7b).

Realizing the helpless, hopeless state of the nation, Isaiah confessed, “O LORD, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand” (64:8).

Like clay in a potter’s hands who shapes, and fashions it into a vessel that reflects his will and purpose, believers should acknowledge God is sovereign and it is His desire to fashion us as the work of His hand (64:8b).

We close with Isaiah’s cry for forgiveness on behalf of Israel and Judah (64:9-12).

Isaiah reminded the LORD, “we are all thy people” (64:9b). Recollecting that we are considering events that had not yet happened, but would when Nebuchadnezzar’s army lay siege to Jerusalem, Isaiah prophesied the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, “our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised thee” destroyed by fire (64:10-11).

No doubt a prayer that the people would pray in Babylon during their captivity, Isaiah prayed, “Wilt thou refrain thyself for these things, O LORD? wilt thou hold thy peace, and afflict us very sore?” (Isaiah 64:12)

Isaiah 65-66 is God’s answer to Isaiah’s questions. We are blessed to look back on history and know God did hear the prayers of His people, and Israel did return to her land as a nation.

Truth – God is never slack concerning His promises!

1 John 1:9 – “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

There was No Man, No Intercessor (Isaiah 59-63)

Scripture reading – Isaiah 59-63

We continue our chronological reading of the Scriptures with Isaiah 59-63 serving as today’s Bible reading assignment. My devotional commentary will be limited to Isaiah 59.

Isaiah 59 is a message to the wicked and serves as a terrible indictment against the sins of the nation. Consider several principal points we can take from this chapter.

The first, God longed to save Israel from judgment, but the people were unwilling to repent of their sins (59:1-2).

God was able and willing to save the people, if they cried out to Him (59:1). However, the sins of the people had alienated them from the LORD (59:2), and He refused to hear their impenitent prayers (Psalm 66:18).

The sins of Israel, like the sins of our nation, demanded God’s judgment (59:3-8).

As a whole, the society of Isaiah’s day was cruel and perverse. The hands of the people were “defiled with blood.” They were liars (59:3). There was no justice in the land and none who desired truth (59:4a). The people had put their faith in liars and conspiracies (“mischief”) that they might continue in their sin (59:4b).

They were like “cockatrice’ eggs” (i.e. newly hatched poisonous vipers), ruining and killing (59:5-6). They raced to commit evil and gave little thought to the blood they would shed or the wake of destruction they had caused (59:7). They knew nothing of peace, cared nothing for justice, and mislead any who followed them (59:8).

Isaiah 59:9-11 lists the effects of a nation’s wickedness upon society:

Lawlessness and spiritual darkness (59:9); despair and hopelessness (“grope for the wall like the blind” – 59:10); hostility (“roar all like bears” – 59:11) and mourning (“mourn sore like doves” – 59:11); injustices (“we look for judgment, but there is none” – 59:11), and despair (“salvation…is far off” – 59:11).

There was hope for Israel, but only if that nation confessed and repented of their sins (59:12), hypocrisy (59:13), injustices (59:14), abuse and persecution of the righteous (59:15).

The LORD looked upon Israel and mourned “that there was no intercessor” (Isaiah 59:16). Seeing “no man” to intercede, the LORD was moved to bring “salvation…and His righteousness” (59:16). That salvation would be offered through the suffering Messiah who would be rejected (53:3), sacrificed “as a lamb to the slaughter” (53:7), and “bare the sin of many, and (would make) intercession” (53:12).

The Second Coming of Christ, His Millennial Kingdom on earth, and His judgment of the wicked is prophesied (59:17-21).

Christ will judge the wicked on the basis of His righteousness (59:17a) and will exercise vengeance on those who rejected Him (59:17b-18). Christ will return to reign as “Redeemer…to Zion” (in Jerusalem) and He will rule those who have repented of their sins (59:19-20).

Christ’s return as a Righteous King and Judge is sealed as a perpetual covenant: “My spirit…my words…shall not depart…from henceforth and for ever” (59:21).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“Seek Ye the LORD While He May Be Found” (Isaiah 54-58)

Scripture reading – Isaiah 54-58

Today’s devotional commentary will be limited to Isaiah 54-55.

Isaiah 54Who is Our God?

Following the prophetic portrait of a suffering, dying Savior in chapter 53, Isaiah 54 opens with a call for the people of Israel to “break forth into singing” (54:1) in a prophetic picture of Israel’s return from captivity.

Using the familiar marriage portrait of a husband and wife (54:5), the LORD is pictured in this passage as the husband and Israel as a barren wife (54:1). When her years of tears and sorrows in captivity are fulfilled, Isaiah prophesied that Israel would be invited to turn to the LORD.

Looking to the Millennial Kingdom, Israel was promised when that nation is restored to the land that her presence and shadow will be greatly enlarged, “on the right hand and on the left.” We who are Gentiles by birth are children of God by faith and no longer Gentiles, but spiritual heirs (54:2-3).

Who is the God of the Scriptures? Isaiah 54:5 reveals He is “thy Maker” (Creator), “thine husband” (Master), the “LORD of hosts” (God of war), “Redeemer” (Savior), the “Holy One of Israel” (Holy God), “The God of the whole earth” (Sovereign God). What a great God we serve!

Isaiah 55 – A glorious invitation from the LORD to the Gentile nations.

The “servant” of God Who suffered and died in Isaiah 53 is revealed in Isaiah 55 to have offered Himself as a sacrifice for the sins of the world. Israel had been invited to break forth into singing in Isaiah 54, but in Isaiah 55 the invitation is given to “every one that thirsteth” (55:1), Israel and other nations (55:5).

Isaiah 55:6-13 is one of the great invitations in all Scripture. Seek the LORD”, turn to Him confessing your sin before it is too late (55:6).  Repent, “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD” (55:7).

Warning: Only fools presuppose their thoughts and ways are right apart from God’s revelation (55:8-9).

Isaiah 55:8-9 – “8  For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the LORD. 9  For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

I close with an observation concerning the emphasis and preeminence the Word of God is given in Isaiah 55:11.

Isaiah 55:11 – “So shall my word [truth; revelation] be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void [ineffectual; empty; i.e. having no effect], but it shall accomplish [do; make] that which I please [take pleasure or delight in], and it shall prosper [succeed] in the thing whereto I sent it.

“My Word…shall not return unto me void!” (Isaiah 55:11)

What a great promise for those who teach God’s Word! Indeed, to all who share God’s Word, the LORD promises His Word, will accomplish what He pleases and “it shall prosper.” (Isaiah 55:11)

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

An Invitation: God Is Waiting to Hear Your Call (Isaiah 28-30)

Scripture Reading – Isaiah 28-30

Continuing our chronological study of the Old Testament, we transition from the prophecies of Hosea, whose ministry was directed primarily to the northern ten tribes (Israel, also referred to as Ephraim), and return to Isaiah 28.

Isaiah 28 – Isaiah announced two judgments in Isaiah 28.

The first was God’s judgment against “the crown of pride” (which I believe is a reference to the royal capital city of Samaria) and “the drunkards of Ephraim,” which I interpret to be the political and spiritual leaders of the northern ten tribes (28:1-4). Referring to Assyria as “a mighty and strong one” (28:2), Isaiah prophesied the LORD would send against Ephraim a nation that would trod “under feet” (28:3) and “eateth up” (28:4).

Isaiah 28:5-6 refers to a period of time that is still future (unless one considers the reign of Hezekiah, the godly king of Judah as a partial, immediate fulfillment) and will be fulfilled at Christ’s Second Coming.

The second prophecy of judgment was directed to Judah, who witnessed the destruction of her brethren to the north, but continued in her sin and wickedness (28:7-15).

The wickedness of Judah was revealed in the drunkenness of her priests and prophets. Those leaders who should have called the nation to the LORD were guilty of drunkenness (28:7) and self-indulgence. Their feasts had become drunken banquets vividly portrayed as “tables…full of vomit and filthiness” (28:8).

Realizing the looming threat of Assyria, rather than repent of their sins and turn to the LORD, Judah’s leaders sought an alliance with Egypt (28:14-15; 30:1-5) that God described as “your covenant with death” (28:18).

Judah’s only hope was a Messianic prophecy: “Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste [not be ashamed; panic]” (28:16). The New Testament reveals the “precious corner stone, a sure foundation” is Jesus Christ (1 Peter 2:4-7; Mark 12:10; Romans 9:33).

Isaiah 29

To understand Isaiah 29, when you read “Ariel”, think of Jerusalem for we read that Ariel was “the city where David dwelt” (29:1). Isaiah 29:1-14 is the prophet’s warning of God’s imminent judgment against Jerusalem that would be fulfilled in Assyria’s siege of the capital city.

The distress, mourning, and siege of Jerusalem was a historical event that took place in 701 B.C. when Assyria defeated Israel (the northern ten tribes) and would have overwhelmed Jerusalem if the LORD had not intervened (37:36).  Knowing that prophecy often has an imminent and a far-reaching application, I believe Isaiah 29:7-8 describes the future siege when the nations of the world will be gathered against Jerusalem during the “battle of Armageddon” (Zechariah 14:1-3; Revelation 14:14-20; 16:13-21).

Isaiah 29:15-24 reminds us that the God of Heaven is Sovereign Creator and nothing escapes His knowledge or is beyond His control. The leaders of Judah were foolish, thinking God had no knowledge of their schemes, plans, and sins committed in secret (29:15).  Isaiah reasoned, no more than the potter’s clay could rise up against the potter, how foolish for man to assert of God, “He made me not?” (29:16).

Isaiah 29:17-24 is, in my opinion, a picture of Christ’s Millennial Kingdom after His Second Coming. His earthly kingdom will be glorious: The earth will be transformed and fruitful (29:17), the deaf will hear, the blind will see (29:18), and the meek and poor will rejoice (29:18).  What a glorious day that will be!

Isaiah 30A prophecy of woe against Jerusalem

Rather than turn from her sin and return to the LORD, Judah turned to Pharaoh and Egypt for deliverance from her enemies (30:1-7).  Isaiah warned, Judah’s attempt to purchase Egypt’s protection would all be in vain (30:7).

Isaiah 30:8-17 paints a graphic portrait of Judah’s rebellion against God and His Word.

The LORD commanded Isaiah to write down His warning of judgment (30:8) and to describe the rebellious nature of the people… “lying children, children that will not hear the law of the LORD” (30:9).

In spite of their sin and rebellion, Isaiah assured the people that God is gracious, compassionate, and just (30:18). When they cry out to Him, He will hear and answer their cry (30:19).

Isaiah 30 closes with a promise of Judah’s restoration to the land (30:18-26). Isaiah prophesied the defeat of Assyria that is, I believe, symbolic of the defeat of all the nations of the earth that will gather against Jerusalem when Christ returns and establishes His Millennial Kingdom (30:27-33; Revelation 19:11-21).

An Invitation: Someone reading today’s devotional might identify in their own life some of the sins of Judah: Hypocritical worship; a disdain for spiritual truth; a pattern of minimizing sins; excusing rebellion, and a defiance of God and authority.

There is hope for you, as there was for Judah, if you are willing to confess your sins, turn to the LORD, and seek His forgiveness.

1 John 1:8-10 – “8  If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9  If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10  If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

God is My Salvation! (2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9-12)

Scripture Reading – 2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9-12

2 Chronicles 27

The contrast between the wicked kings of Israel and the kings of Judah continues with an observation that Jotham, the king of Judah, “did that which was right in the sight of the LORD” (27:1-2). God blessed Jotham and he secured the nation militarily and “became mighty, because he prepared his ways before the LORD his God” (27:6).

Isaiah 9 – The Coming Messiah

Isaiah’s prophecies against Israel, specifically the northern ten tribes, continues in Isaiah 9. The idolatry of the people and their rejection of the LORD, His Law and Commandments demanded a season of chastening that began “lightly,” but the LORD “did more grievously afflict” the nation (9:1). In the midst of Israel’s afflictions, Isaiah prophesied that God would send His Messiah, a son who would be born of a virgin.

Isaiah 9:6 – “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful [Marvelous; Extraordinary], Counsellor [God of all wisdom], The mighty God [all powerful; Omnipotent], The everlasting Father [Father of all Eternity], The Prince of Peace [source, the fount of lasting peace].”

The birth of Jesus Christ fulfilled only the first phrase of Isaiah 9:6 and the Jews’ rejection of Christ, His crucifixion, death and resurrection leaves the balance of that prophecy yet to be fulfilled at Christ’s Second Coming (Isaiah 9:6-7).

Isaiah 9:8-10:4 pronounces God’s future judgment on Israel (in this passage described as “Ephraim and the inhabitant of Samaria,” the capitol city of the northern ten tribes (9:8-9).

Isaiah 10 – Prophecy of Israel’s Fall to Assyria

Isaiah prophesied and history testifies that Assyria would invade Israel, destroy cities, and take the people captive (10:5). God described the Assyrian nation as “the rod of mine anger,” and foretold He would send that heathen people against Israel whom Isaiah said was “an hypocritical nation…the people of my wrath” (10:6).

The Assyrians did not know they were a vessel, a tool in the LORD’S hand, to chasten His people for their sin (10:7). Nevertheless, Assyria’s harsh treatment of Israel and that nation’s boast of their conquests would provoke God’s judgment against them (10:8-19).

Isaiah prophesied the LORD would preserve Himself a remnant of His people (10:21), and unlike the other nations who were taken captive, assimilated, and forever lost to time, God would intervene just when Judah appeared to be on the brink of destruction, and “Lebanon (i.e. Assyria) shall fall” (10:34).

Isaiah 11 – A Messianic Prophecy

The coming Messiah was identified as “a rod out of the stem of Jesse” (11:1), Jesse being the father of King David. Making legitimate the Messiah’s claim to the throne of Israel, he would be born of the lineage of King David, and therefore a royal son and heir to the throne of Israel (Isaiah 11:1).

Isaiah 11:1-2 – “And there shall come forth a rod [shoot] out of the stem [stock] of Jesse (father of King David), and a Branch [descendant] shall grow out of his roots: 2 And the spirit of the LORD shall rest upon Him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the LORD;”

The Millennial Kingdom, over which the Messiah will reign, will be one of righteousness (11:2-5) and universal peace (11:6-9). Israel will be united to her homeland as one people and the Gentile nations will seek the LORD in His holy city, Jerusalem (11:10-13).

Isaiah 12 – A Song of Salvation

Two times we notice the phrase, “And in that day,” in Isaiah 12.

“That day” is yet future, but it is the day when God will gather His chosen people, Israel and Judah, who have been scattered to the “four corners of the earth” (11:11-12) and assemble them as one nation and one people.

“In that day” the people will worship the LORD and say, “I will praise thee…God is my salvation…the LORD Jehovah is my strength and my song; He also is become my salvation” (12:1-2).

This glorious day of restoration as God’s chosen people finds the inhabitants of Zion (Jerusalem) singing praises to the LORD for He, “the Holy One of Israel” dwells in the midst of His people (12:6).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Israel, Behold Your King Cometh! (Amos 6-9)

Scripture Reading – Amos 6-9

Amos 6

Amos 6 continues the prophet’s declarations of “woes”, against Israel, identified as Samaria, and Judah, identified as Zion (6:1).  Identifying Philistine and Syrian cities that had fallen to the Assyrian army, Amos questioned if Israel and Judah were foolish enough to believe the same would not soon befall them (6:2).

In spite of the clouds of judgment on the horizon, the people continued to indulge themselves, resting on “beds of ivory”, eating “the lambs out of the flock;” entertaining themselves with music, drunkenness and reveling in pleasures till they were carried into captivity bearing the chains of slavery (6:4-7).

Six prophetic visions: Five Prophecies of Judgment and the Sixth of the Day the LORD will Establish His Heavenly Kingdom. (Amos 7-9)

Amos 7 – Three Judgments

The First Judgment: Locusts (7:1-3)

God had determined to bring locusts to devour the people’s second harvest (7:1).  Amos pleaded with the LORD for the people and He “repented” (7:3). Though the sins of the people demanded His judgment, the LORD heard the prayer of His prophet and, because He is longsuffering, God determined to withhold His sentence for a season.

Reminder: “The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much” (James 5:16b)!

The Second Judgment: Fire (7:4-6)

Fire drying up water is a picture of the drought God planned to bring against His people.  Once again, God heard the intercession of His prophet and “repented” (7:6).

The Third Judgment: A Plumb Line (7:7-9)

The plumb line is a tool used by a builder to make sure a wall is straight.  God’s plumb line of judgment is His Law.  Seeing the plumb line of God’s Law and Commandments and the failure of the people to obey and keep the Law, Amos did not intercede for Israel (identified as “the house of Jeroboam”).

Truth – Preachers who faithfully declare the Word of God often find themselves in conflict with government and religious authorities.

The priest Amaziah, whom King Jeroboam II had appointed to serve as “the priest of Bethel,” warned the king that the prophet Amos “hath conspired against thee” (7:10) prophesying, “Jeroboam shall die by the sword, and Israel shall be led away captive” (7:11). Amaziah admonished Amos there was no place for him in Israel (7:10-11) and demanded the prophet flee to Judah (7:12).

Rather than heeding the warning of God’s judgment against the nation, Amaziah demanded the prophet be silent and “prophesy not again” (7:13). Amos rehearsed God’s call upon his life, and though he was a man of common stock and not the son of a prophet, the LORD had called him to prophesy, and he would not be silent (7:14-15). Rather than silence, Amos boldly declared God’s judgment (7:16-17).

Amos 8 – The Fourth Judgment: Fruit harvested at the end of the summer season, expressing the imminence of God’s judgment.

Amos 9 – The Fifth and Final Judgment, and a Vision

The final judgment prophesied by Amos was a vision of the temple destroyed (most likely not the one in Jerusalem, but the idolatrous one established by Jeroboam I in Samaria at Bethel). Amos warned, “All the sinners of my people shall die by the sword” (9:10).

The prophecies of Amos would come to pass. Israel, the northern kingdom consisting of ten tribes, was the first to be taken captive, and scattered “among all nations” (9:9).

Judah, the southern kingdom consisting of Judah and Benjamin, was promised, “I will not utterly destroy the house of Jacob” (9:8).  Seventy years after Judah was taken captive by Babylon, the Jews were allowed to return to their land, and to rebuild the Temple (Ezra 1) and the city of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:20; 9:11-15).

Amos 9 concludes with God’s promise to one day restore God’s people to their land and place a legitimate heir on David’s throne (9:14-15). 

A legitimate heir of David has not sat upon the throne of Israel since the time of the captivity. A portion of the house of Judah has returned to their homeland, but no king reigns in Israel. When a legitimate heir of Israel sits on the throne of David, He will be none other than Jesus Christ, Son of David, the Only begotten Son of God, the King of kings and Lord of lords.

Revelation 1:7-8 – “Behold, he cometh with clouds; and every eye shall see him, and they also which pierced him: and all kindreds of the earth shall wail because of him. Even so, Amen. 8  I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The King is Coming! (Obadiah 1; Psalms 82-83)

Scripture Reading – Obadiah 1; Psalms 82-83

Our Scripture reading is the Book of Obadiah, with only twenty-one verses it’s the smallest book in the Old Testament. Today’s reading also includes Psalms 82 and 83. The focus of today’s devotional commentary will be limited to the Book of Obadiah.

With the exception of his name (1:1), little is known regarding the prophet Obadiah; however, we know he was a contemporary of the prophets Habakkuk, Haggai, and Malachi. Obadiah’s prophecy is directed to the Edomites who were of the lineage Esau. The key city of Edom was Petra, the “Red Rose City” of the desert that was conquered by the Nabataean Arabs around 300 B.C.

Background of Obadiah 1

The Edomites were descendants of Esau (Genesis 25:30; 36:1) who was the twin brother of Jacob (1:10), and the son of Isaac (Genesis 25:19-26). The strife between Esau (father of the Edomites) and Jacob (father of Israel) began in their mother’s womb. Esau and Jacob’s animosity continued throughout their lifetimes and was passed on to their offspring. In fact, the conflict and animosity we observe between Israel and her Arab neighbors in our day can be traced to Isaac’s two sons, Esau and Jacob.

In His sovereignty, God rejected Esau (the firstborn son of Isaac) and chose Jacob and his lineage to be heirs of the Abrahamic Covenant (Genesis 12:1-3).  Though Israel was commanded to view Edom as “thy brother” (Deuteronomy 23:7), the Edomites harbored resentment for Israel (Ezekiel 35:5) evidenced in Obadiah’s prophecy against that people.

For today’s commentary, I suggest Obadiah’s prophecy be studied in three parts:

  1. The charge against Edom and the prophecy of their destruction (1:1-9).
  2. The sins Edom committed against Israel (1:10-18), identified as “thy brother Jacob” (1:10).
  3. God’s promise to deliver Israel from captivity (1:17-18), defeat her enemies (1:19-20), and establish His kingdom and throne in Jerusalem (1:21).

Obadiah 1:17-21 is yet to be fulfilled.

The gathering of the Jews as one nation (“the house of Jacob” being Judah, the southern kingdom; “the house of Joseph, the northern kingdom – 1:17-18), the judgment against “the house of Esau” (1:19), the Second Coming of Christ when He will sit on David’s throne, and reign as the Messiah King (1:20-21).

In that day, “at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; 11 And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:10-11).

Take heart believer! Though the world around us seems out of control, God is on His throne and every promise and prophecy will be fulfilled!

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Devil is Behind the World’s Hatred of the Jews and Israel

Friday, December 22, 2017

Daily reading assignment – Revelation 12-17

Today’s scripture reading is a prophecy of the last half of the Tribulation years.  Because the length of the assigned reading is far too long for a brief devotional commentary, I will limit today’s devotional to Revelation 12.

From the time of his fall, Satan and the angels who followed his rebellion (described as “the third part of the stars” who were cast out of heaven – Revelation 12:4; Isaiah 14:12-15; Ezekiel 28:12-17), have warred against God.  Satan’s failed rebellion in heaven continued on earth when he, in the form of a serpent, tempted Adam and Eve to disobey God (Genesis 3).

Revelation 12 is a prophetic portrait of the war of the ages and is set in the second half of the Seven Years Tribulation (Matthew 24:21-22).

The woman described in Revelation 12:1 is the nation of Israel; identified by the twelve stars in her crown representing the twelve tribes of Israel.  It is this woman, symbolic of Israel, that is the focus of Satan’s final stand against God.  Israel, pictured as a woman with child suffering labor pains, is an image of persecution (12:2).  The birth of the child being delivered is symbolic of Israel’s coming  Messiah.

The “great red dragon” is Satan (12:3-4) and the “seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads” (12:3) represent nations and thrones that are confederates in the devil’s unrelenting attack on Israel.

Revelation 12:4 describes the rebellion Satan led among the angels in heaven when his heart was lifted up in pride (Isaiah 14:12-15; Ezekiel 28:12-17).  After being cast out of heaven (12:7-9), the devil’s focus was to destroy God’s promise of a Savior Redeemer by annihilating the Hebrew people.

The woman (Israel) gives birth to a son in Revelation 12:5b, describing Christ’s birth (His virgin mother Mary being a daughter of Israel of the tribe of Judah) and His ascension to heaven, “caught up unto God”  (reminding us of Christ’s birth, death, resurrection, and ascension – Acts 1:9).

Revelation 12:7-12 turns our focus back to heaven and the rebellion of one-third of the angels led by the “great dragon…that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world” (12:9a).  The devil “was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him” (12:9b).

Adding to the Devil’s deviant resume’ is his title, “the accuser of our brethren” (12:10). We understand from Job 1-2 that Satan, although cast out of heaven, has access before the throne of God and is the persecutor of the Jews and believers.

The cross, rather than a symbol of defeat, became a symbol of victory and salvation with the resurrection of Christ from the dead (12:10b-12a).  Having failed to prevent Christ’s resurrection, the devil pours out his wrath on Israel and “persecuted the woman [Israel] which brought forth the man child” (meaning Christ, 12:13).

Israel’s flight from persecution during the Tribulation is described as “the woman …given two wings of a great eagle”, possibly drawing upon the picture of Israel’s deliverance out of Egypt “on eagles’ wings” (Exodus 19:4).  As the trials and troubles of the last years of the Tribulation increase, some of Israel will find a safe place in the wilderness and be spared (12:14); others will become the object of the devil’s wrath as the nations of the earth align against the Jews (12:15-17).

The Hebrew people have been, and continue to be, the object of hate and persecution in the world.  Anti-Semitism is increasing dramatically and its horrid head is visible in the Middle East, throughout Europe, and in the United States.  None of these facts should surprise us. Christ warned His Disciples The Great Tribulation would bring a time of trouble like the world has not seen (Matthew 24:21).   The spirit of anarchy, rioting, violence, and terrorist attacks we are witnessing in our society are ominous signs the Tribulation years are upon us.

Friend, take courage; we know the end of the story and the defeat of Satan’s rebellion is certain.  When Christ comes again, he will defeat Satan and crush the nation’s aligned with him (Rev. 19:11-21).  After the Millennial years, the devil and his demons will be condemned to the lake of fire for ever (Revelation 20:3, 7-10).

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

Scripture Reading for Friday, December 8, 2017

Dear Heart of a Shepherd Followers and Hillsdale Family,

Today’s Scripture reading is Revelation 1-6.  I hope to post a devotional commentary later today; however, for now I encourage you to continue our “Read-Thru the Bible” schedule in the absence of my commentary.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith