From Grazing to Grace (Daniel 4-6)

Scripture reading – Daniel 4-6

Today’s Scripture reading is lengthy (Daniel 4, 5, and 6), and for that reason I will limit my devotional commentary to one chapter, Daniel 4.

Daniel 4 – A Testament to the Tragedy of Sinful Pride

King Nebuchadnezzar was one of history’s greatest rulers and was a man whose life was a testimony to the sovereignty of God. He was, in the words recorded by the prophet Jeremiah, the servant of the LORD when God employed the king’s ambition and judged Judah for that nation’s sin and rebellion (Jeremiah 25:9; 27:6; 43:10). While there is some dispute as to whether or not Nebuchadnezzar died a man of faith, there is certainty that his life was a testimony of God’s providence and grace.

We find Nebuchadnezzar was afflicted with a spiritual malady, of his own choosing, that is the nemesis of mankind–Pride.

Solomon warned his son, “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18). Pride is the rotten root of man’s sinful nature and is at the core of man’s wickedness. We read in the psalms,

Psalm 10:2 – “The wicked in his pride doth persecute the poor…”

Psalm 10:4 – “The wicked, through the pride of his countenance, will not seek after God: God is not in all his thoughts.”

Nebuchadnezzar was no stranger to pride. He was the most powerful figure in the world of his day. His accomplishments are nearly unrivaled: A mighty warrior, a great administrator, a visionary and master-builder. His tenure as king spanned 43 years (605 BC-562 B.C.) and during his reign, Babylon grew from a city-state to an empire. Babylon encompassed an estimated 14 square miles and was fortified by a triple line of walls, the outermost wall being 300 feet high and 80 feet across at the top (wide enough for four chariots to race abreast).

Daniel 4 finds Nebuchadnezzar enjoying the “golden years” of his reign. He was “at rest” (4:4a), and his war years were behind him. The king was enjoying the fruits of his labor and the spoils of war; however, we find him troubled by a dream, a vision that he demanded interpretation.

After the king’s magicians and astrologers failed to interpret his dream (4:7), Nebuchadnezzar summoned Daniel (4:8) and expressed his confidence that God had given him a gift for interpreting dreams (4:9). The king proceeded to tell Daniel his dream (4:10-18), and when he was finished, we read that Daniel was speechless for an hour. (4:19).

Nebuchadnezzar, seeing that Daniel (also known by his Chaldean name, Belteshazzar) was troubled by the meaning of his dream (4:19), exhorted him to interpret his dream.

Daniel answered the king’s command by tactfully preparing him for the bad news saying, “My lord, the dream be to them that hate thee, and the interpretation thereof to thine enemies” (4:19c).

Daniel then explained the dream saying, the tree was a symbol of the king’s power and accomplishments (4:20a, 22b); however, like the tree, he would soon be cut down, deemed insane, and driven from the palace where he would spend seven years living like a wild beast.

Daniel urged Nebuchadnezzar to repent of his pride (4:27), warning the king that only when he would acknowledge the sovereignty of God in the earth (4:26) would he be healed and restored as king.

Twelve months passed (4:29) while God patiently waited for the king to repent of his sinful pride and acknowledge Him as Sovereign.

One day the king was walking about the terrace of his palace, and looking out upon the city he boasted with sinful pride, “Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?” (4:30)

The king had refused to humble himself, and his pride exceeded God’s patience. God had given the king 12 months to repent, however, when the time of God’s judgment had come there was no delay.

Daniel 4:31 – While the word was in the king’s mouth, there fell a voice from heaven, saying, O king Nebuchadnezzar, to thee it is spoken; The kingdom is departed from thee.

The king was driven out of his palace and lived like a wild beast. When seven years of humiliation had passed, we read, “Nebuchadnezzar lifted up [his] eyes unto heaven, and [his] understanding returned unto [him] (4:34a). The king acknowledged God’s rule, power, and the breadth of His eternal kingdom.

Nebuchadnezzar confessed that the God of heaven is immutable and His kingdom and reign is eternal, “from generation to generation” (4:34b). As He had promised, God restored the king to his throne (4:36), as he confessed, that the “King of heaven” is just and He is able to bring low the proud (4:37).

Friend, you cannot know when you might refuse to hear God’s voice for the last time. You cannot know when you might hear your last invitation, your last opportunity to confess your sin and repent.

Ecclesiastes 9:12 – “For man also knoweth not his time…”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

You Are Invited to, “The King of Kings is Coming!” – Sunday, September 13, 2020

Good morning! You are invited to join Hillsdale Baptist Church for our public worship services this Sunday morning. We are looking forward to an uplifting day of worship in music and a message in the 10:30am service on the Sovereignty of God.

Our Children’s Rally time begins at 9:00am in the Friendship Hall and is followed by Kid’s Choir (9:15am-9:45am) with Music Pastor Steve Armstrong. Our Children transition to their Sunday School classes at 9:45am.

Teen and Adult Bible Studies all begin in their individual classes at 9:15am. Pastor Brian Barber will be teaching the auditorium class and broadcasting live at 9:15am on Hillsdale’s Facebook Page and at www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.

Pastor Smith is continuing his prophetic series in Hillsdale’s 10:30am service with a message titled, “The King of Kings is Coming,” a study in the sovereignty of God taken from the Book of Joel, chapter 1. Please click on the links to print out your student notes for today’s message.

The King of Kings is Coming (part 2) – September 13, 2020 AM student blank

The King of Kings is Coming (part 2) – September 13, 2020 AM student blank

Reminder: Hillsdale’s 9:15am Bible studies and 10:30am worship service are open to the public and also broadcast live on Hillsdale’s Facebook Page and at www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Travis D. Smith, Pastor

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“Daniel: A Model of Godly Character, Integrity and Courage” (Daniel 1-3)

Scripture reading – Daniel 1-3

The Book of Daniel is a prophetic panorama of human history, beginning with the days of Nebuchadnezzar and ancient Babylon and encompassing a prophetic vision of world empires that would follow…Medo-Persians, Greece and Rome.  Daniel’s writing includes prophecies that are for the 21st century reader a footnote in history past and a foretelling of future events that conclude with the Second Coming of Christ. Today’s devotional commentary will be taken from Daniel 1.

Daniel 1

Daniel 1 opens with a straightforward, historical account and one we are familiar with from our earlier study of 2 Kings 24:12-16. The children of Judah are in Babylonian bondage, and the beloved city of Jerusalem, and the Temple will soon be laid waste (2 Kings 25).  The prophet Jeremiah warned Judah’s kings if the people did not repent of their sin and turn to the LORD, His wrath would rise “against His people, till there was no remedy” (2 Chronicles 36:16).   Jeremiah prophesied the captivity in Babylon would last 70 years (Jeremiah 25:12) and when those years were “accomplished at Babylon [God] will visit you… causing you to return to this place [the promise land]” (Jeremiah 29:10).

Daniel was probably no more than 13-14 years old when he was taken from his home and transported to Babylon with its strange language and idolatrous culture. Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, instituted a plan and chose the best and brightest of Israel’s impressionable youth that they might serve him in the administration of his empire (Daniel 1:8).  Daniel was numbered among those youth who were without blemish, handsome, discerning, cunning, and “understanding science, and such as had ability in them to stand in the king’s palace, and whom they might teach the learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans” (1:4).

Daniel soon proved he was not only a gifted young man, but also a child of faith. Three other youth of Judah shared Daniel’s passion for the LORD: “Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah: 7  Unto whom the prince of the eunuchs gave names: for he gave unto Daniel the name of Belteshazzar; and to Hananiah, of Shadrach; and to Mishael, of Meshach; and to Azariah, of Abednego” (1:6-7). Leading by example and conviction, we read,

Daniel 1:8 – “But Daniel purposed [pledged; determined; made a decree] in his heart that he would not defile [pollute; soil; stain] himself with the portion of the king’s meat, nor with the wine [lit. intoxicating wine] which he drank: therefore he requested [desired; sought; enquired] of the prince [captain; governor] of the eunuchs [most likely a castrated servant] that he might not defile [pollute; soil; stain] himself.”

Daniel purposed: He pledged his heart, and resolved in his character, “he would not defile himself” (Daniel 1:8).

What courage!  What conviction!  What passion!  God was at work and He blessed Daniel and providentially “brought [him] into favour [mercy; kindness; grace] and tender love [to have compassion; pity; i.e. brotherly love] with the prince[chief] of the eunuchs [who were the servants of the king] (1:9).

Faithful to their convictions and respectful of their authorities, God blessed the faith of Daniel and his three companions, and when they were proved (i.e. tested and examined), they appeared healthier than those “children which did eat the portion of the king’s meat” (1:15).

We will see in our study, that the testing of Daniel’s faith in his youth prepared his heart for the opportunities, challenges, and trials he would face in his service to the kings of both Babylon and Persia (1:21).

I close inviting you to consider four qualities that defined Daniel’s submissive and sensitive heart to authority: He was subordinate in his spirit (1:12); he was sincere in his appeal (1:12); he was Scriptural in his purpose (1:12-13); and he was sensitive in his request (1:13-14).

We would do well to weigh our spirit, manner, and relationship with the authorities in our lives, using Daniel as perfect example of a young man of faith and convictions.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Let Us Never Forget 9\11

So much has changed in our world since the morning of September 11, 2001. It might be argued that whatever innocence (or naivety) that remained in our society, was suddenly rent from the heart of our nation when Islamic terrorists, in an unprovoked attack, struck a blow at the soul of America.

The World Trade Center, an international symbol of American capitalism collapsed in a pile of rubble. The Pentagon, a symbol of our nation’s military might, suffered a direct hit.  The crash of United Airlines Flight 93 into a field in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, became a symbol of American heroism as average citizens determined they would not go to their deaths as helpless victims.

“We the People” became one that day as sorrow, anger, and patriotic zeal spanned the differences that often divide us. Race, religion, and political ideologies were set aside for an all too brief season as we grappled with an assault on our individual freedoms and sanctity as a nation.

We congregated in America’s churches, sought solace in each other’s company, wept and prayed. For a time, there was hope of a spiritual awakening, a humility and sincere turning back to the LORD that would bring revival in the hearts and souls as a nation. Instead, we find America torn asunder by petty partisanship, and violence that not only afflicts our cities, but assaults our sensibilities of law and justice.

King David asked, “Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?” (Psalm 2:1). The answer: Because the nations, the political governing bodies of the world, are opposed to God, and the people of the earth are by nature, rebellious. The greater question to ponder is, “Why is God so patient, so longsuffering with sinners?”

“The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.” (2 Peter 3:9)

With the heart of a shepherd,

Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Never Forget Those Who Died…and Those Who Stood: I Am a Proud American!

SEVENTH IN A PACKAGE OF NINE PHOTOS.–– An explosion rips through the South Tower of the World Trade Towers after the hijacked United Airlines Flight 175, which departed from Boston en route for Los Angeles, crashed into it Sept, 11, 2001. The North Tower is shown burning after American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the tower at 8:45 a.m. (AP Photo/Aurora, Robert Clark)

The Day of the LORD (Joel 1-3)

Scripture reading – Joel 1-3

The Book of Joel is another of the minor prophets of the Old Testament Scriptures (not minor in the sense that his ministry was unimportant, but in the brevity of the book that bears his name and fills only three chapters in the Bible).

We know little of Joel except that his ministry was to Judah, the Southern Kingdom ,and he was the “son of Pethuel” (Joel 1:1). Even the dates that Joel ministered are unknown, although scholars suggest he might have prophesied during the reign of King Joash (835-796 B.C.).

The Book of Joel described three catastrophic invasions that would befall Judah and serve as symbols of the great and dreadful judgment that would come upon the world in the “Day of the LORD.”

Joel 1 – A Plague of Locusts

From antiquity to our modern day, locusts have been the haunt of mankind, often devasting a nation’s crops and producing a famine that leaves both man and beast starving.

Joel called upon all the people of Judah to acknowledge the plague of locusts was unlike any the nation had faced (1:2-3). Coming in four waves (1:4), the locusts had entered Judah like an invading army, and there was nothing left to feed or sustain the population (1:4-7). Fruit vines, trees, and crops were in ruin, and the “field is wasted…corn is wasted” (1:10). There were no offerings to the LORD, because there was no harvest (1:9).

Why would the LORD allow this frightening hoard of locusts to descend upon His people and leave them starving? Because the LORD in His mercy will use natural disasters to cause a nation to reflect on its sin, repent, and turn to Him.

Joel called upon the “ministers of God, the priests, to stand between the altar and the porch of the Temple. Dressed in “sackcloth,” there were to “howl” all night and sorrow that there were no offerings, because there was no harvest (1:13). If the people did not repent of their sins and turn to God, Joel warned “the day of the LORD [was] at hand, as a destruction from the Almighty” (1:15).

After describing the devastation left in the wake of God’s judgment (1:16-18), Joel cried out to the LORD for the nation,

Joel 1:19-2019  O LORD, to thee will I cry: for the fire hath devoured the pastures of the wilderness, and the flame hath burned all the trees of the field. 20  The beasts of the field cry also unto thee: for the rivers of waters are dried up, and the fire hath devoured the pastures of the wilderness.”

Joel 2 – The Invasion of a Heathen Horde

The second invasion that comes as God’s judgment on Judah was that of a great army, so vast in number, they were like the locusts that had darkened the sky in Joel 1. Once again, the warning of an invading army gave cause for the people to repent of their sins and call upon the LORD (2:1).

We read, “the day of the LORD cometh, for it is nigh at hand” (2:1). A day described as, “a day of darkness and of gloominess, a day of clouds and of thick darkness” (2:2). The enemy will be “a great people and a strong; there hath not been ever the like, neither shall be any more after it” (2:2b).

The enemy of God’s people would spread across the land like a “fire devoureth” (2:3) and the sound will be “like the noise of a flame of fire [that] devoured” (2:5). The judgment of God on “the day of the LORD” will affect the universe, for “the earth shall quake before them; the heavens shall tremble: the sun and the moon shall be dark, and the stars shall withdraw their shining” (2:10).

Having stated the “day of the LORD is great and very terrible” (2:11), Joel declared the invitation of the LORD saying,

“Turn ye even to me with all your heart, and with fasting, and with weeping, and with mourning: 13  And rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the LORD your God: for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil” (2:12-13).

Joel prayed for a national revival and called out to God,  “Spare thy people, O LORD, and give not thine heritage to reproach, that the heathen should rule over them: wherefore should they say among the people, Where is their God?” (2:17b).

Knowing God is gracious and merciful, Joel encouraged the people if they would repent, the LORD would restore the nation, bless the land and “restore to you the years that the locust have eaten…26 And ye shall eat in plenty, and be satisfied” (2:18-26).

Joel 3 – Armageddon

Joel prophesied the regathering of the Jews to Judah and Jerusalem (3:1), and the Gentile nations gathering against Israel (3:2) in the Valley of Jehoshaphat (3:2, 12). The sins of the nations against Israel are listed (3:3) and God promised he will reward those nations for the evil they have done to His people (3:4). Knowing the oppression and ill treatment Israel and Judah had suffered (3:3-8), the LORD promised to make war against the nations of the earth (3:9-17).

I close observing there are two Gentile nations that are specifically named for destruction in the Day of the LORD: Egypt and Edom (3:19).

From time immemorial, Egypt and Edom (represented among the Arab tribes and nations of our day), have been perpetual enemies of Israel and Judah. Of those nations we read,

“Egypt shall be a desolation, and Edom shall be a desolate wilderness, for the violence against the children of Judah” (3:19).

All of this will surely be done in that day, “for the LORD dwelleth in Zion” (3:21).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

He that is Mighty Watches Over Israel! (Ezekiel 46-48)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 46-48

Today’s Scripture reading concludes our devotional study of the Book of Ezekiel. We have followed the prophet from his work as a 30-year old priest ministering to His people “in the land of the Chaldeans” (Ezekiel 1:3), to God calling him to serve as His prophet.

Ezekiel prophesied the judgment of God against Judah and foretold the siege of Jerusalem by Babylon. The prophet warned the Temple would be destroyed and the land left desolate. While false prophets lied to the people, Ezekiel faithfully confronted their sins, and warned the imminent judgment of God (2:3-5).

While the judgment and destruction of Jerusalem and Judah were assured, the LORD revealed to Ezekiel that He would not altogether forsake Israel, promising to one day resurrect the nation (Ezekiel 37).  The LORD encouraged His prophet that the Jews would not only be restored to their land, but even described in exacting detail the dimensions of the new Temple the LORD Himself would build in the Millennium Kingdom (Ezekiel 40-43).

Having prophesied the Jews would be restored to their land, the guidelines and the role of priests was defined in Ezekiel 44:9-31. The division of the land was given, including the portion set aside for the LORD (45:1-5) and the portion of the sacrifices to be offered in memoriam to Christ’s sacrifice (45:6-27). Three Feasts or festivals are renewed during the Millennial reign of Christ: The New Year’s Feast (45:18-20), the Passover (45:21-24), and the Feast of the Tabernacles (45:25).

Ezekiel 46 – Sabbaths, New Moons, and Sacrifices

Ezekiel’s record of his vision of the Temple and the worship and offerings continues in chapter 46. Worship on the Sabbath and on the New Moon is noted (46:1-3). Guidelines for feasts and regulations for sacrificial offerings observed during the Millennial Kingdom are given (46:4-15).

Ezekiel 47 – The River of Life

The source of the “River of Life” is observed by Ezekiel as coming forth from the threshold of the Temple (47:1-2). The water begins to flow as a trickle of water and is described as ankle deep (47:3); however, it soon became a mighty river that nourished the city and the land (47:4-5).

The “River of Life” will bring new life to the land of Israel, nourishing trees, healing the Dead Sea and turning it into a thriving sea of life with fish (47:6-12) where fisherman cast their nets.

Guidelines, instructions, and boundaries for dividing the land is recorded in Ezekiel 47:13-23.

Ezekiel 48 – The Land Divided Among the Tribes of Israel

With the central portion of Israel, the land around the Temple and Jerusalem, noted as a sacred district (48:8-22), there were seven tribes to the north that were assigned their lands by tribe (48:1-7). The land south of the sacred district was assigned to the five remaining tribes (48:23-29).

Jerusalem, the capital city and the seat of Christ’s government during His millennial reign is described as having twelve gates, each named for one of the twelve tribes (48:30-35). I invite you to notice that new Jerusalem is given a new name: “Yahweh Shammah,” meaning, “The LORD is there” (48:35).

I close with an observation: With the exception of Israel, the nations and people of the antiquity are either a footnote in history or have been altogether assimilated into the populations of the world. The Jewish people alone stand out as the exception.

The Jews have survived indescribable suffering, atrocities, purges, and attempts at mass annihilation. Yet, there exists today a small sliver of land in the Middle East known as Israel, a testimony of God’s faithfulness and sovereign care of His people.

There is no explanation for the existence of the Jewish people apart from Elohim.

He that is Mighty watches over Israel!

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Student Notes for Pastor Smith’s Study of Proverbs 4

Dear Heart of a Shepherd Readers,

I overlooked attaching the student notes for tonight’s verse-by-verse study of Proverbs 4. The links below give you the PDF and the Microsoft Word format.

A Father’s Exhortations to His Children – Proverbs 4 – student lesson without verses – blank

A Father’s Exhortations to His Children – Proverbs 4 – student lesson without verses – blank

My class handouts include my own amplification of each verse in tonight’s study of Proverbs 4; however, I do not make an online distribution of those unabridged notes.

If you would like a copy of the student notes with my amplification of the verses, please email your request to HeartofaShepherdInc@gmail.com before 4:00pm EST.

Tonight’s class will be broadcast live on Hillsdale’s Facebook Page and at www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Hillsdale’s Wednesday Evening Family Ministries

You are invited to Hillsdale’s Wednesday Evening Family Ministries beginning with Family Dinner (5-6pm; $4\ea), Teen Bible Study and Activity at 6pm, and AWANA Clubs at 6:15pm.

Adult Classes begin with a time of Prayer at 6:15pm.

Following prayer, Bible Study Classes begin around 6:35pm.

Pastor Smith is continuing his Character Study Series in the Book of Proverbs with tonight’s study focusing on Proverbs 4. Pastor’s class will be broadcast live on Hillsdale’s Facebook Page and at www.HillsdaleBaptist.org.

“Ancient Paths,” a study of Bible Covenants, is a ladies’ class taught by Mrs. Sheilah Smith in the Friendship Hall.

Travis and Tanya Henry are teaching a Family\Parenting\Marriage Class that is practical in its focus on Scriptural principles

For more information, call the church office at 813-884-8250, ext. 0.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

New Jerusalem and the Millennial Temple of the Messiah (Ezekiel 43-45)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 43-45

Ezekiel is ministering to a people in captivity whose homeland has been left desolate. The Temple was in ruins and Jerusalem was destroyed. For many, the hope of returning to their land had died with the nation. It was in the hour when all seemed lost, that the ministry of Ezekiel became one of encouraging the people that there was hope. The LORD had not forsaken His people, nor had He forgotten His promise to restore them to their land.

The LORD, in a vision, sent a messenger to Ezekiel (40:1-4), “a man, whose appearance was like the appearance of brass” (40:3), who commanded the prophet to open his eyes and ears, and see and declare to “the house of Israel” all that he would be shown (40:4).

Ezekiel 40-44 – The LORD revealed to Ezekiel the Temple of the Millennial Kingdom when Christ would reign upon the earth.

Ezekiel recorded the dimensions of the New Temple: The outer court, its gates, and rooms (40:5-26); the inner courtyard of the Temple grounds (40:27-47). The dimensions of the Temple porch (40:48-59), its outer sanctuary (41:1-2), and inner sanctuary (41:3-5) were recorded. There were also buildings outside the Temple that were for the priests who were ministering in the Temple (42:1-20).

Ezekiel 43 – The Glory of the LORD Filled the Millennial Temple

The Temple of the Messiah in the Millennium Kingdom continues to be the focus of Ezekiel 43 and Ezekiel 44. The messenger then brought Ezekiel in the vision to look on the New Temple and he watched as “the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory” (43:2).

What an incredible sight and sound that must have been! What wonderful news for a people who had lost everything! The news of a new Jerusalem and a new Temple must have moved the people to rejoicing!

Ezekiel’s response to seeing the glory of God filling the Temple moved him to fall upon his face before the LORD (43:3). Ezekiel writes,

Ezekiel 43:4-64  And the glory of the LORD came into the house [Temple] by the way of the gate whose prospect is toward the east. 5  So the spirit took me up, and brought me into the inner court; and, behold, the glory of the LORD filled the house. 6  And I heard him [the LORD] speaking unto me out of the house; and the man stood by me.

According to Zechariah 6:12-13, the Temple of the Millennial Kingdom will be built by the LORD and He will sit upon His throne in the Temple.

The LORD spoke to Ezekiel and revealed that His throne would “dwell in the midst of the children of Israel for ever” (43:7). The presence of the LORD would move the hearts of the people to repent, and be “ashamed of their iniquities” (43:10).

We read that there was “the law of the house [Temple]” (43:12). What was the law of the Temple?

The law of the Temple was this: “Upon the top of the mountain [upon which the Temple was built and where the LORD ruled from His throne] the whole limit thereof round about shall be most holy” (43:12).

Unlike the Temples that had gone before and been polluted by the sins of the people, this Temple would be perpetually holy because the LORD Himself was seated on the throne not only as the KING, but also as PRIEST. The author of Hebrews writes,

Hebrews 4:14-1514 Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. 15 For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.

The apostle John shared a similar experience with Ezekiel when the LORD revealed to Him “a new heaven and a new earth” (Revelation 21:1).

Revelation 21:3-53  And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God. 4  And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. 5  And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.

What a glorious day that will be when the LORD Jesus Christ reigns and there will be no more tears, death, sorrow, crying, or pain.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith