Tag Archives: Alcohol

A Lesson and Admonition for Social Drinkers

Friday, October 27, 2017

Daily reading assignment – Habakkuk 1-3

Our “Read-Thru the Bible” challenge continues today focusing on a small prophetic book in the Old Testament, the Book of Habakkuk.  Habakkuk was a prophet whose brief ministry served as a final warning of the LORD’s judgment on Judah for the sins of the people.  A contemporary of Jeremiah, Habakkuk’s lamentation over Judah and the imminent invasion of the Chaldeans was an ominous conclusion of a succession of warnings faithfully delivered by the prophets.

Only three chapters long, Habakkuk’s prophecies were as much an appeal to the LORD for Judah as they were a lamentation over the devastation God’s people would soon face as the invading armies of Babylon (the Chaldeans) swept over land, destroying Jerusalem and the Temple.

Habakkuk 1 is a record of Judah’s sins (1:1-4) and a warning that God would use the wicked Chaldeans to punish the sins of His rebellious people (1:5-17).  Habakkuk questioned why the LORD would use Babylon, a heathen nation whose wickedness far exceeded the sins of Judah, to punish His chosen people (1:12-13).

Habakkuk 1:13 – “Thou art of purer eyes than to behold evil, and canst not look on iniquity: wherefore lookest thou upon them that deal treacherously, and holdest thy tongue when the wicked [Babylon] devoureth the man [i.e. Judah] that is more righteous than he?”

Having questioned the ways of the LORD, the prophet waited for an answer (2:1) and the LORD graciously responded (2:2-4).  The judgment of God was set against Judah; however, God had not forsaken His chosen people, therefore, “the just shall live by his faith” (2:4; note Romans 1:16-17).

Although God would use Babylon as a tool to exact justice on Judah for the wickedness of the people, He was not blind to the sins and wickedness of the Chaldeans (2:5-20).  There are several grievances the prophet raises against Babylon, among them their drunkenness (2:5, 15-16), greed and covetousness (2:6-9), violence (2:10-14, 17-18), and idolatry (2:19-20).

Habakkuk began with a cry of lamentation over the sorrows and sufferings that would soon engulf Judah (1:1-4), but ends with the prophet praying and acknowledging the LORD’s sovereignty (3:1-2) and majesty (3:3-16).  The prophet had moved from questioning the LORD to trusting His ways and rejoicing in His faithfulness (3:17-19).

Habakkuk 3:17-19 – “Although the fig tree shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in the vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut off from the fold, and there shall be no herd in the stalls:
18  Yet I will rejoice in the LORD, I will joy in the God of my salvation.
19  The LORD God is my strength, and he will make my feet like hinds’ feet, and he will make me to walk upon mine high places. To the chief singer on my stringed instruments.”

I close this devotional drawing your attention to two verses too many 21st century Christians trivialize and dismiss as they assail any who dare question their “Liberty”.   Berating the sins and wickedness of Babylon, one in particular is mentioned twice…wine and drunkenness (Habakkuk 2:5, 15).  The Chaldeans are condemned not only for their drunkenness, but also for giving strong drink to mock and take advantage of their neighbor.

Habakkuk 2:5 – “Yea also, because he transgresseth by wine, he is a proud man, neither keepeth at home, who enlargeth his desire as hell, and is as death, and cannot be satisfied, but gathereth unto him all nations, and heapeth unto him all people:”

Habakkuk 2:15 – “Woe unto him that giveth his neighbour drink, that puttest thy bottle to him, and makest him drunken also, that thou mayest look on their nakedness!”

Lesson: Wine and strong drink chart the path to unrestrained pride, shameless adultery, uninhibited lust, and gross immorality.

Warning: What foolish parents and charlatan pastors exercise in moderation, their children will practice to excess…and heartache and ruin will invariably be the end!

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

“Slay the Three-headed Monster: Gluttony, Booze and Self-indulgence”

September 14, 2017

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 23-24

Proverbs 23-24 is our scripture reading for today as we continue to mine truths found in this book one author described as “Common Sense in Overalls” (source unknown).   The principles and precepts found in Proverbs leave no room for ambiguity if one believes Solomon wrote exactly what the Holy Spirit directed him to write (2 Peter 1:21).  Today’s devotional commentary focuses on Proverbs 23:20-21 and Proverbs 23:29-32.

Proverbs 23:20  “Be not among winebibbers [drunken; heavy drinkers]; among riotous eaters [gluttons; squanderers] of flesh:”

Solomon addressed a pattern of sin that has been the ruin of the greatest of men and women—drunkenness and gluttony.   American families are a tragic testimony of excess in each.   A 2009 survey found 63.1% of Americans are overweight [there are medical reasons for some; however, the majority cannot take refuge behind that defense].   Gluttony is not only sinful (Proverbs 23:2; Philippians 3:19); it is a leading cause for high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, cancers and arthritis.  As a nation, we are eating ourselves to death!

Believers are not only guilty of gluttony, there is a growing number of believers trivializing imbibing in wine and alcohol.   Championing Christian liberty, some pastors are leading their families and congregations to accept wine and alcohol proving the adage: Liberty for one becomes a license for another.

Wonder what those torchbearers of “liberty” will say to parents burying a child killed in an alcohol related accident?   What rationalizations will they offer when a vice they approved leads a family to the morass of abuse and addiction?

Proverbs 23:21  “For the drunkard and the glutton shall come to poverty [driven to poverty]: and drowsiness [sleepiness; indolence; slumber] shall clothe [dress] a man with rags.”

Solomon observed that a man given to excesses of drunkenness and gluttony tends to laziness [i.e. “drowsiness”] and follows a path to want [“poverty” and “rags”].  Solomon warned his son alcohol may desensitize a soul, but it never solves problems.  A series of six questions describe the sad lot of those given to wine and drunkenness (23:29-30).

Proverbs 23:29-30 – “Who hath woe [grief; despair; cry of lamentations]? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions [strife; brawlings]? who hath babbling [complaints; disparaging talk]? who hath wounds [bruise] without cause [for naught; for no good reason]? who hath redness [dullness, implied from drinking wine] of eyes [sight]? 30 They that tarry long [delay; remain] at the wine [strong drink]; they that go to seek mixed wine [with herbs or honey].”

Those who indulge in strong drink have a penchant for “woe” and “sorrow” or what some today describe as “mental illness” and depression.  The excessive cost of alcohol consumption in the United States in 2006 was estimated to be $223.5 billion.

Of course, we cannot place a dollar amount on alcohol’s human toll.   Solomon described the suffering of alcoholism as “wounds without cause…redness of eyes”.   Failing health, physical and sexual abuses, failed marriages, splintered families, ruined careers, crime, murders and suicides can all be ascribed to drunkenness.   Solomon admonished his son:

Proverbs 23:31-32 – “Look [examine; choose] not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it moveth [walk; behave] itself aright. 32 At the last [in the end] it biteth [sting; strike] like a serpent [viper], and stingeth [wound] like an adder [poisonous serpent].”

The phrase “moveth itself aright” describes the redness of the wine and its sparkle when it is strongest and most alcoholic in content.   Solomon warned his son…don’t look at it; don’t desire and imbibe in wine when it has fermented for it will be like the bite of a poisonous viper when it delivers its mortal wound.

Someone reading today’s devotional will take an exception to my commentary and dismiss Solomon and this simple author.  You indulge your liberty and take solace in others coming to your defense; however, I wonder where those “friends” will be when your son or daughter descends into the dark, dismal hole of sinful indulgence attempting to fill the void and emptiness of their soul with drugs and alcohol?

1 Corinthians 6:9-10  “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind, 10  Nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God.”

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

Strong drink beguiles men and only fools deny the obvious!

August 31, 2017

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 20-21

The Book of Proverbs is a gold mine of spiritual truths able to confront the foolish, correct the misguided and enrich the soul of any willing to mine its chapters.   As a teenager, I made it a practice to include in my Bible readings a chapter of Proverbs a day.  Looking back, I regret I did not slowdown, meditate and search out the meaning and application of the proverbs.

The majority of today’s devotional commentary was first written for this blog, January 20, 2014.   The scripture reading assigned today is Proverbs 20 and Proverbs 21; however, my focus will be one verse, Proverbs 20:1.

Proverbs 20:1 – “Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.”

The proliferation of alcohol use in our society, now accompanied by a demand to legalize the use of marijuana is disconcerting.   The pursuit of pleasure without self-discipline or moral restraint has given rise to a desire to dull the conscience and many are turning to alcohol, wine and drugs to fill their empty souls.

Consider the following statistics from the website of Mothers Against Drunk Driving [MADD].

1) Almost half of drivers killed in crashes who tested positive for drugs also had alcohol in their system.

2) In 2011, 226 children were killed in drunk driving crashes.  Of those, 122 (54% percent) were riding with the drunk driver.

3) Drunk driving costs the United States $132 billion a year.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention gives the following statistic concerning Alcohol use:  In 2010 there were 25,692 alcohol-induced deaths (this number excludes accidents and homicide deaths related to alcohol use).

The statistics I cited may not come as a surprise to many reading this blog.   Given the personal, family and societal ills associated with alcohol, I am shocked there is a growing acceptance of social drinking among Christians.  Adding to the tragedy is not only the silence of the pulpit, but also the affirmation of some preachers for the use of alcohol.

Solomon addressed the nature of wine and alcohol in Proverbs 20:1, writing:

Proverbs 20:1 – “Wine [fermented wine] is a mocker [scorner; holds in derision], strong drink [intoxicating; alcohol] is raging [roar; troubled; clamorous]: and whosoever is deceived [stray; mislead] thereby is not wise [almost always condemned].”

The wine referenced by Solomon was naturally fermented and often diluted with water.  Echoing his mother’s instructions (Proverbs 31:3-7), Solomon warned his son, undiluted wine and “strong drink” expose a king to ridicule and shame (“strong drink” was usually made from fruits and vegetables – 31:6).

There are many professing Christians in the 21st century who cite references in the Bible to support their use of wine and alcohol; however, an honest study of the history of alcohol reveals today’s “strong drink” is a far cry from the wine and “strong drink” of the Scriptures.   Distilling beer and other strong drinks is a relatively modern process not perfected until the 12th and early 13th centuries.   In other words, the alcohol content of today’s beverages is far greater than any mentioned in the Bible.

The first nine verses of Proverbs 31 record what I believe are the words of Bathsheba, Solomon’s mother, and her instructions to her son who would one day reign as king of Israel.  Knowing the temptations for excess that would pass before her son as an eastern monarch, Bathsheba admonished Solomon:

Proverbs 31:4-5 – “It is not for kings, O Lemuel, it is not for kings to drink wine [fermented drink; that which intoxicates]; nor for princes [rulers; judges; those who weigh matters of law] strong drink [intoxicants; alcoholic liquor]:5 Lest they drink, and forget [fail; cease to care] the law, and pervert the judgment [cause; plea] of any of the afflicted [troubled; depressed; poor; lowly; humble].”

The terrible toll imbibing in wine and alcohol has had on humanity is legion.  Slick television advertisements hide, deny and disguise the reality there are multitudes of families scarred by the emotional, physical and spiritual cost of alcohol.   Only a fool would deny the reality of alcohol’s destruction on marriage, home and career.

Consider the following evidences:

Statistics from The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism [Focus on the Family – 2002]

– Nearly half of all violent crimes happen under the influence of alcohol

– People under the influence of alcohol commit 86% of all murders

– People under the influence of alcohol commit 60% of sexual offenses

– 30% of deaths in auto accidents, nearly 15,000 deaths annually, are alcohol related

Mother’s Against Drunk Driving  (MADD) study found that 95% of all college campus crimes (including date rape and sexual promiscuity) are alcohol related.

The devastating effects on health [http://alcoholism.about.com/cs/abuse/a/aa000728a.htm]

– 75% of esophageal cancers in the U.S. occur in heavy drinkers

– 50% of cancers in the mouth, pharynx and larynx are alcohol related

Bathsheba was fearful, should her son be given to the use of wine and alcohol, the nation would suffer the consequences of a king with distorted judgment.

21st century Christians would be wise to heed Bathsheba’s admonitions and Solomon’s counsel:  Strong drink beguiles men and only a fool denies the obvious!

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

“Fundamental Tenets of Feminine Graces”

aged womenWe transition in our study of Titus 2 from a focus on the “aged men” to the “aged women” Titus was to instruct in the churches.

Titus 2:3 – “The aged women likewise, that they be in behaviour as becometh holiness, not false accusers, not given to much wine, teachers of good things;”

Who are the “aged women”? I suggest they are past the childbearing and child-rearing years of life. I think we can safely say the “aged women” of our day would be 50 years or older, having reared their own children to adulthood.

Having instructed Titus to challenge the “aged men” of the church (2:2), the apostle now encourages the young preacher to exhort the “aged women” to aspire to four godly traits.

mature womenTitus 2:3 – The aged women [old women; note – 1 Timothy 5:2] likewise [in like manner; in the same way…as the older men], that they be in [in earnest; about] behaviour [demeanor; i.e. condition; manner of life] as becometh holiness [reverence; suitable; i.e. worthy of character; holy], not false accusers [slanderer; malicious gossips; note – 1 Timothy 3:11], not given [servants; enslaved; in bondage] to much wine, teachers of good things [i.e. teacher of the right, good or what is beautiful];”

The first trait of “aged women” was they were to be holy in demeanor [“in behaviour as becometh holiness”], models of godly character in their bearing and whole manner of life.  In word, deeds, dress and personal disciplines, the “aged women” were to be portraits of holiness.   Paul instructed the same in his letter to Timothy when he writes:

1 Timothy 2:9-10 – “In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest [goodly and proper] apparel, with shamefacedness [reverence; modest, rather than brazen and irreverent] and sobriety [discreet; good judgment and restraint]; not with broided hair [elaborate weaves with], or gold, or pearls, or costly [expensive] array; 10 But (which becometh [befits] women professing godliness) with good works.”

Secondly, the “aged women” were to be cautious in conversation [“not false accusers”].  They were not to be numbered among those who have a proclivity to gossip and tale bearing.  Not unlike our own day, Paul described some women in the early church as idle, wandering about from house to house; and not only idle, but tattlers also and busybodies, speaking things which they ought not” (1 Timothy 5:13). The “aged women” were to not be in the company of slanderers or gossips.

alcoholThirdly, the “aged women” were to be free from intoxicants [“not given to much wine”].  Some aged women, perhaps because of the loneliness of old age, had turned to “much wine” to dull their sorrows.  As one who frequently visits nursing homes and shut-ins, I have seen more than my share of elderly men and women who, having been all but forgotten by their loved ones, fell into what John Bunyan described in “The Pilgrim’s Progress” as the “slough of despondency” [described as melancholy in the early 20th century and today defined as depression].

There are a growing number of professing Christians who champion strong drink as an expression of Christian liberty in spite of numerous biblical arguments against Christians indulging in the use of wine, beer and alcohol.  Giving little thought to the Bible’s admonitions concerning intoxicants that impede one’s judgment or the historical reality that wine in ancient times was not only far less alcoholic than our own day, but was also watered down for consumption, some who defend their indulgence, will tomorrow mourn their influence in their children and friends.teaching

I invite you to consider the following verses in your research of this subject (Proverbs 20:1; 23:20-21, 31; Romans 14:21).

Finally, the “aged women” were to be “teachers of good things” (Titus 2:3). They were to teach the “younger women” (2:4-5) by word and example.

My next devotional will focus on the “good things” the “aged women” were to teach the “young women” (Titus 2:4-5).

Have a blessed day!

Copyright 2016 – Travis D. Smith

Proverbs 31:3-6 – Danger: What parents do in moderation their children take to excess!

alcohol related accidents and deathMuch of Proverbs 31 is devoted to extolling the qualities of a model wife and mother; however, the opening verses of this chapter are a king’s recollection of his mother’s loving instructions to him as a boy.   Many believe Lemuel [lit. “unto God”] was Bathsheba’s nickname for her son Solomon, heir to the throne of his father David.

We will note two of four guiding principles the Queen Mother taught her son in preparation for the day he would be king.   Every godly parent longs to see their sons and daughters walk in a godly, upright manner—therefore, these “princely principles” are not only worth noting, but instilling in your home as you train, guide and discipline your children.

The first guiding principle is an exhortation to Be Pure (31:3).Purity

Proverbs 31:3 – “Give not [do not deliver or direct] thy strength [virtue; honor] unto women, nor thy ways [path; journey] to that which destroyeth kings [wipeout – i.e. washing ink off a leather scroll].”

Bathsheba, Solomon’s mother, knew well the devastating consequences of immorality.  Her sin of adultery with David had resulted in the murder of her husband Uriah and the weight of God’s judgment when the son she had conceived in adultery died as a punishment of David’s sin.

Bathsheba taught her son that immorality was a cancer to a man’s character and would erode his ability to rule in honor and reign as a virtuous king.  She warned “Lemuel” that a path of promiscuity and sinful pleasure would lead him down a road of destruction.  For more on this topic I invite you to read Proverbs 7:10-21.

alcoholismThe second guiding principle the Queen mother taught her son was an exhortation to Be Sober (31:4-5).

Proverbs 31:4-5 – “It is not for kings, O Lemuel, it is not for kings to drink wine [fermented drink; that which intoxicates]; nor for princes [rulers; judges; those who weigh matters of law] strong drink [intoxicants; alcoholic liquor]5 Lest they drink, and forget [fail; cease to care] the law, and pervert the judgment [cause; plea] of any of the afflicted [troubled; depressed; poor; lowly; humble].”

The terrible toll imbibing in wine and alcohol has had on humanity is legion.  Slick television advertisements hide, deny and disguise the reality of multitudes of families scarred by the emotional, physical and spiritual cost of alcohol.  Only a fool would deny the reality of alcohol’s destruction on marriage, home and career. Consider the following evidences:

1) Moral effect: Children and teens exposed to alcohol use have a predisposition for alcohol abuse. – 20% of 5th graders have experienced intoxication from alcohol consumption;  60% of 6th graders say they feel pressured by other students to drink;  More than 50% of 8th graders have tried alcohol;  80% of 12th graders have used alcohol  [Focus on the Family – Parent’s Guide to Teen Health]

Statistics from The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism:  Nearly half of all violent crimes happen under the influence of alcohol;  People under the influence of alcohol commit 86% of all murders;  People under the influence of alcohol commit 60% of sexual offenses;  30% of deaths in auto accidents and nearly 15,000 deaths annually are alcohol related.   [Focus on the Family – 2002]

Mother’s Against Drunk Driving  (MADD) study found that 95% of all college campus crimes (including date rape and sexual promiscuity) are alcohol related.

2) Physical effect: Devastating effects on health:  75% of esophageal cancers in the U.S. occur in heavy drinkers; 50% of cancers in the mouth, pharynx and larynx are alcohol related [http://alcoholism.about.com/cs/abuse/a/aa000728a.htm]

effect of alcohol consumptionIn spite of the undeniable reality of alcohol’s curse and the Bible’s warnings concerning the desensitizing effect intoxicants have on man’s conscience and judgment,  many in today’s church are promoting the liberty of “social drinking”.   Alcohol deceives and Bathsheba’s concern was that her son would fail to heed her warnings concerning wine and alcohol and the nation would suffer the consequences of a king with distorted judgment.

Proverbs 31:5 – “Lest they drink, and forget [leave; fail; cease to care] the law, and pervert the judgment [cause; plea] of any of the afflicted [troubled; depressed; poor; lowly; humble].”

The Old Testament prophet Hosea echoed the same concern with alcohol’s curse on man’s reasoning. “Whoredom and wine and new wine take away [seize; take hold of] the heart [mind; understanding].”  (Hosea 4:11)

A godly parent, realizing the evil and toll of alcohol, must teach and model for their children the reality that all intoxicants—drugs, wine and alcohol—are a curse.  They dull the senses, distort perception and pervert one’s judgment.

Danger: What parents do in moderation their children take to excess!

Copyright 2015 – Travis D. Smith

Proverbs 23:1-3 – “Don’t Make a Pig of Yourself”

don't make a pig out of yourselfProverbs 23 opens with an admonition concerning those who are given to rich foods and a gluttonous appetite.   As the son of a king and the father of a son who would be king, Solomon warns his son that dining with the rich and powerful may be dangerous to your health!

The majority of those reading this blog are, like this author, “common stock” and ordinary kind of people.  The idea of dining with the rich and famous is foreign to us.  As a son of the south, my appetite runs more toward a bowl of grits for breakfast, a sandwich and sweet tea for lunch, and cornbread and pinto beans for dinner!  In fact, not to confuse anyone, an evidence of my southern roots is that “lunch” is dinner and “dinner” is supper [non-southerners are now thoroughly confused]!   Since we are talking southern delicacies, let’s top dinner off with a piece of “pee-can pie” [sic]!

Allow me to amplify Proverbs 23:1-3 and make some practical applications. gluttony

Proverbs 23:1-3 – “When thou sittest [dwell; remain; abide] to eat [devour; consume] with a ruler [wealthy; powerful; influential], consider diligently [regard; discern; understand; notice] what [and “Who”] is before thee: 2 And put [call for; commit] a knife to thy throat, if thou be a man given [as a slave to a master] to appetite [greed; lust]3 Be not desirous [covet; lust; long for] of his dainties [delicacies; savory meats]: for they are deceitful [lies; vanity; emptiness] meat [foods; breads].”

We take two lessons from this passage:  1) When dining with the rich, powerful and influential, be discerning of what you are consuming and with whom you are dining. Watch your table manners; be discreet; be disciplined in your appetite. (23:1-2)

Golden Corral2) Don’t be a glutton. It is better to put a knife to your throat than one to your plate if you are unwilling to discipline your passion for eating!

The Biblical story of Daniel’s refusal to defile himself with the “king’s meat and wine” (Daniel 1) is a powerful illustration of Proverbs 23:3.  The savory smell of the king’s meat might have stirred Daniel’s appetite; however, he had resolved that he would not defile himself…he would not be a slave to his flesh.

My friend, “Golden Corral” might be your idea of the good life; but spending too much time at the pig trough is not only unwise, it will send you to an early grave!

Proverbs 20:1 – A Warning Concerning Alcohol and Other Vices

alcohol abuseThe proliferation of alcohol use in our society, now accompanied by a political tidal wave to accept marijuana as a legal drug, is disconcerting.  The pursuit of pleasure without moral restraint has given rise to a desire to dull the conscience and many are turning to alcohol, wine or drugs to fill their empty souls.

Consider the following statistics from the website of Mothers Against Drunk Driving [MADD].

1) Almost half of drivers killed in crashes who tested positive for drugs also had alcohol in their system.

2) In 2011, 226 children were killed in drunk driving crashes.  Of those, 122 (54% percent) were riding with the drunk driver.

3) Drunk driving costs the United States $132 billion a year.

wreck and alcoholThe Center for Disease Control and Prevention gives the following statistic concerning Alcohol use:  In 2010 there were 25,692 alcohol-induced deaths (this number excludes accidents and homicide deaths related to alcohol use).

The statistics I have cited may not come as a surprise to many reading this blog.  Given the personal, family and societal ills associated with alcohol, I am shocked that there is a growing acceptance of social drinking among Christians.  Adding to the tragedy is not only the silence of the pulpit, but also the affirmation of some preachers for the use of alcohol.

Solomon addressed the nature of wine and alcohol in Proverbs 20:1, writing:

Proverbs 20:1 – “Wine [fermented wine] is a mocker [scorner; holds in derision]strong drink [intoxicating; alcohol] is raging [roar; troubled; clamorous]: and whosoever is deceived [stray; mislead] thereby is not wise [almost always condemned].

The wine referenced by Solomon was naturally fermented and often diluted with water. Solomon warns his son that undiluted wine has the potential of exposing a man to ridicule and shame.  “Strong drink” would have been made from fruits and vegetables.drunk driving

Some Christians cite references in the Bible to support their use of wine and alcohol; however, a brief history study will reveal that today’s “strong drink” is a far cry from the wine and “strong drink” of the Scriptures.   For instance, the distilling of beer and other strong drinks is a relatively modern process that was not perfected until the 12th and early 13th centuries.  The alcohol content of today’s beverages is far greater than any mentioned in the Bible.

Solomon warns his son, drunkenness will expose a man to scorn, make him loud, obnoxious and a fool. In a passage we will study later, Solomon challenges his son to refrain from wine in the performance of his responsibilities as king (Prov. 31:3-7).

Christians would be rise to heed Solomon’s admonition!

Copyright 2015 – Travis D. Smith