Tag Archives: Anger

Prayer for Students and Families of Broward County, FL

The news of the senseless slaughter of innocent young lives in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, Wednesday afternoon, February 14, 2018 dominates the news this morning.  As of this morning, the death toll remains at 17 and the names of the dead, students and teachers, has not been released.

Like you, I am aware the tragedy of the loss of life reaches far beyond the dead…siblings, parents, grandparents, friends, classmates, teachers, administrators, neighbors, and yes, our state and nation…are all affected and scarred by the violence, suffering and death.

Liberal pundits will stand in their bully-pulpits and blame firearms for the loss of life.  The media and anti-liberty zealots opposed to the 2nd Amendment, will attack the NRA and conservatives, and advocate the need to limit, if not eliminate private ownership of guns and rifles.

Few will look deeper and honestly examine why this happened.  Why 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, a former student expelled last school year from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, would plan and unleash a hail of gunfire on students of his former high school?

We are learning Cruz’s life is scarred as much as the wounds he inflicted on innocent lives Wednesday.  USA Today reports, “teachers and former classmates say [Cruz] had an angry disposition that led to him being expelled and flagged as a danger on school grounds.”

Former classmates describe Cruz as a troubled soul and many say they are not surprised he unleashed his fury in an act of violence. According to Fox News, an unnamed student told a news station, “kids joked around that the student [Cruz] would be the one to ‘shoot up the school.’”

Cruz is a troubled soul and tragedy seems to have been the haunt of his life.  Fox News reports Cruz and a younger brother were adopted and both his father and mother, Roger and Lynda Cruz, are dead.  Roger apparently died of a heart attack several years ago and Cruz’s mother, Lynda, died of pneumonia November 1, 2017.  Unhappy with family members who took him in, sometime after Thanksgiving 2017, Cruz moved into a mobile home with a high school friend who is a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Cruz’s anger, rage and violence are pandemic in a generation educated in classrooms and nurtured in a society with an irreligious view of human life.  The doctrine that human life is sacred and every life is to be cherished is lost on a generation that mocks God, denies the Creator, and is entertained with acts of violence in video games and television programs from early childhood.

I am not surprised a 19-year-old murdered 17 classmates; I am surprised it does not happen more often.  Look into the eyes of today’s youth and you will find many who appear soulless…unloved and unloving; desensitized by bitterness, rejecting authority, angry with God, and waiting to be triggered into an act of rage that will not only destroy their lives and future, but leave countless others broken and dismayed.

Remembering Cain, the first son of Adam, murdered his brother Abel (Genesis 4:8), we understand the problem is not guns and rifles; the problem is sin.  The invitation to this generation is the same as it was to Cain when God wrestled with his sinful soul and asked, “Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen? 7  If thou doest well, shalt thou not be accepted?…” (Genesis 4:6-7).

God warned Cain, “…if thou doest not well, sin lieth [crouches] at the door. And unto thee shall be his desire [sin drives our desires], and thou shalt rule over him [man will either master sin or sin will become his master](Genesis 4:7).

King Solomon taught his son the same truth, “[A sinner’s] own iniquities shall take [trap] the wicked himself, and he shall be holden [entrapped] with the cords [ropes] of his sins.”

Nikolas Cruz, and I am afraid many like him, is the personification of hopelessness.  Sinners have but two paths to choose in life…Remorse or Repentance.  Cruz followed the path of remorse and dejection and left in his wake 17 lost lives.

Repentance, on the other hand, assumes responsibility, admits guilt (Psalm 51:4), confesses sins, and seeks forgiveness (1 John 1:9).

Let us pray for the lives touched by the loss of 17 lives, but remember there are many Nikolas Cruz’s in our midst who feel unloved, act unloving, need to know the love of God, and our lives serve as the conduit of compassion for their lost souls.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2018 – Travis D. Smith

Attitudes are an External Indicator of the Bent or Direction of One’s Heart and Thoughts

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Daily reading assignment – Proverbs 13

Our society defines attitudes from an emotional perspective and deflects personal responsibility.  If someone exhibits a bad attitude, psychologists deem them victims—victims of poverty, neglect, rejection or abuse. Rather than taking responsibility and self-correcting one’s bad attitude, people find it easier to cast dispersion upon a peer or an authority figure they feel has failed them.  In the process of deflecting responsibility for one’s attitudes, they dig a deeper emotional and spiritual rut!

Today’s devotional will challenge you to look into your own heart for the cause of attitudes that beset you.  More than emotions, attitudes are an external indicator of the bent or direction of one’s heart and thoughts.

Proverbs 13:1  “A wise son heareth his father’s instruction [correction]: but a scorner [scoffer] heareth not rebuke [firm reproof].”

Notice the heart attitude of the “wise son”—he hears and heeds his father’s correction, reproof and rebuke.  His attitude toward his father’s discipline is that of a learner, unlike the scorner. The scorner “heareth not rebuke”—he mocks the authorities in his life and holds them in derision. He blames others for his attitudes and justifies his rebellion by focusing on what he perceives as their failures. He is a slave to “stinking thinking”, a pattern rooted within the bent of his heart and thoughts. Allow me to illustrate this truth with a childhood memory.

I remember NASA illustrating the entry of space capsules into earth’s atmosphere in the 1960’s and emphasizing the attitude of the nose of the capsule.  Attitude was the word NASA used to define the direction of the top or nose of the capsule as contrasted with the heat shield at its base. If the attitude of the nose were right, the heat shield at the base of the capsule would deflect the fiery heat of earth’s atmosphere. If the attitude of the capsule were wrong, the capsule and its occupants would burn up upon re-entry. Life and death were directly related to the attitude of the capsule’s nose.

That same principle is true concerning our attitudes. A pattern of bad attitudes will drive one emotionally and spiritually down a path of self-destruction.  However, the answer to a life of bad attitudes [anger, rebellion, resentment, jealousy, etc.] is not to merely confess and correct negative attitudes or emotions…it is to get to the heart of the problem, which is the problem of a sinful heart! In other words, as goes the heart so goes the attitude!

A Right Heart/Mind/Pattern of Thoughts = A Right Attitude

A Wrong Heart/Mind/Pattern of Thoughts = A Wrong Attitude

My friend, if you are waging war with sinful attitudes, the solution is not for others to change, but for you to change. Too many look outside themselves for a solution to enslaving attitudes…a different spouse, different school, different job, different church…foolishly thinking different will make a difference! Not so!

If you are weary of battling with enslaving attitudes, look to the bent and direction of your own heart and “stinking thoughts”.  Take a few minutes and do an honest, spiritual heart check-up and take responsibility for your attitudes! Get control of your thoughts and you will overcome your attitudes (Philippians 4:8; Proverbs 23:7).

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

Forgiveness: What a blessed promise!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Daily reading assignment – Psalms 66-68

Of the three psalms assigned for our scripture reading today, the best known is probably the first, Psalm 66; a psalm of praise and adoration inviting the nations of the earth to “Make a joyful noise unto God” (Psalm 66:1).

Lest someone is tempted to draw a parallel between today’s style of worship music and singing with the phrase “joyful noise” (66:1), I hasten to educate you that the “noise” is the sound of trumpets and shouts of victory and triumph.   David exhorts all people to praise the God of heaven in songs that honor His name (66:2) and invites “All the earth” to worship and sing praises to the LORD (66:4).

The focus of Psalm 66 moves from an invitation to all people to worship the LORD to God’s chosen people, Israel, praising Him (66:8-12).   David’s praise recalls how the LORD had preserved His people and brought them through times of trial and trouble (66:9-12).

Beginning with Psalm 66:13, David’s focus becomes personal: “I will go into thy house with burnt offerings: I will pay thee my vows” (Psalm 66:13).

The psalm concludes with David inviting the people to hear his adoration of the LORD and “what He hath done for my soul” (66:16).  David writes of the LORD’s mercies, grace and willingness to hear his prayers and forgive his sin.

Psalm 66:17-20 17  I cried unto Him [the LORD] with my mouth, and he was extolled [exalted] with my tongue.
18  If I regard [see; perceive; observe] iniquity [sin; wickedness] in my heart, the Lord will not hear [hearken; listen] me:
19  But verily [surely] God hath heard [hearken; listen] me; he hath attended [hear] to the voice [sound] of my prayer.
20  Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy [loving-kindness; love; grace] from me.

David’s life and testimony remind us the LORD is longsuffering, patient and willing to forgive our sins if we will confess and forsake them.  The king had experienced the silence of heaven and the fate of men who “regard iniquity” and continued in sin (66:18).   With praise and confidence, David rejoiced in God hearing his prayer and extending to him His grace (66:19-20).

Some reading this brief devotional might find they are where David was–bearing a weight of sin that has left your soul listless and your heart despondent.  You are too aware of the sorrows and consequences that accompany sin.  Friend, please don’t stay there and risk a seared conscience and a calloused heart.

The apostle John promises, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

WARNING: A Contentious Man is A Spiritual Cancer

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Daily reading assignment: Mark 13-14

The Gospel of Mark, chapters 13-14, is a fascinating reading taking us from the LORD’s discussion of “Eschatology”, the Biblical doctrine of the “Last Things” and His Second Coming (Mark 13) to the dinner at the house of “Simon the Leper (Mark 14:3-9), the institution of “The Lord’s Supper” (Mark 14:16-28), His betrayal and arrest (Mark 14:43-65) and Peter’s threefold denial of the Lord (Mark 14:66-72).  Realizing a thorough commentary on these historical events is impossible; I limit my focus to Judas and his presence and influence on the other disciples.

Mark 14 finds the LORD, His disciples, and dearest friends Lazarus, and his sisters Mary and Martha, having dinner at the home of one “Simon the Leper” (14:3).  Leprosy is a physically disfiguring and was a dreaded disease in Jewish society.  Because lepers were outcasts, the occasion of this feast was most likely a celebration of our Lord delivering Simon from leprosy.  Setting aside postulating regarding Simon’s identity, the central focus of the feast becomes the sacrificial gift offered by Mary, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, and the disciples’ criticisms of her actions led by Judas (14:3b-9).

In an act of sincere love, Mary entered the room where Jesus and His disciples were eating and, breaking the neck of an alabaster jar, a milky cream-colored jar containing spikenard, she poured out its contents on Jesus’ head (14:3b).  John identifies “Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, which should betray Him” (John 12:4), as the disciple who led the chorus of criticism of Mary’s actions, suggesting the spikenard, a perfume fit for royalty and, in Judas’ estimation worth over 300 pence (a full year’s salary in that economy), should have been sold and its proceeds given to the poor (John 12:5).  Leaving no doubt as to Judas’ motives, John writes, “This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief” (John 12:6).  At the time, the disciples did not know that Judas, the trusted treasurer of the Lord and His disciples (i.e. he “had the bag, and bare what was put therein” (John 12:6b) was a thief.

Consider with me Judas’ character and his influence on the disciples.  Judas’ objection carried the appearance of a charitable soul, but in reality he was a thief, a traitor and a deserter.  His words not only implied Mary’s sacrifice was a waste, but it was also a slight against the LORD for receiving Mary’s sacrificial act of love and devotion.

Offering us insight into the influence and leadership of Judas amongst the disciples, we read they shared his objections.  Rather than defend the LORD’s honor and Mary’s action, the disciples “murmured against her” (Mark 14:5).  Jesus rebuked the disciples and silenced them saying, “Let her alone; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me” (Mark 14:6).  Then, affirming Mary’s act of love, Jesus once again spoke of His death and burial (Mark 14:7-8; John 12:7), revealing Mary’s sacrifice would be a lasting testimony of her faith and devotion (Mark 14:8-9).

I close by challenging you with a proverbial principle: Beware an angry man for he will spoil and destroy you with his contentious spirit!  Proverbs 16:21 describes men like Judas who are, “As coals [i.e. black coals] are to burning coals [red hot coals], and wood to fire; so is a contentious man [brawling; strife provoking; quarreling] to kindle [incite; burn] strife [controversy; contest; dispute; quarrel].”

 A contentious spirit has the same destructive effect on a family, church, and an organization as a burning ember of an unattended campfire in the middle of a forest…it has the potential of destroying everything…and the LORD hates it!

Proverbs 6:16, 19 – “These six things doth the Lord hate: yea, seven are an abominationunto him…19A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.”

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

Warning: Sin will rob you of everything you hold dear.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Daily reading assignment: 1 Samuel 26-31

Today’s scripture reading sets the stage not only for the death of Saul, Israel’s first king, but also his son Jonathan who was in line for the throne (although we know David had already been chosen by the LORD and anointed by the prophet Samuel as Saul’s successor).

Integrity, a rare virtue among 21st century men, is descriptive of David whom God described as “a man after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14).  He was not a perfect man; however, integrity was a dominant characteristic of his life.  David loved God from His youth; he was a faithful son, loyal friend, and a great soldier. He was a man of courage; heroic in his deeds and humble in his walk.  When a second opportunity to kill king Saul presented itself in 1 Samuel 26; David, in spite of the appeal of his servant to take his enemy’s life, refused reasoning it was a grave sin to “stretch forth his hand against the LORD’S anointed” (1 Samuel 26:9-24).

Observation: Men of integrity are not driven by opinions or political correctness; their foremost concern is to honor and obey God.

1 Samuel 27-30 is, in the words of John Bunyan’s “Pilgrim’s Progress”, a “Slough of Despond” in David’s life; a representation of sin—portrayed by Bunyan as a deep and muddy pit into which “Pilgrim” falls while on his way to the City of God.  It is the place where Christians stumble when they take their focus off God and view trials through the eyes of fate rather than the eyes of faith.

Life’s trials and troubles present us with two choices: 1) We can walk through life living by our wits and human reasoning and find our dwelling in emotional and spiritual pits; 2) Or we can look at trials and troubles through the eyes of faith and obedience and choose joy.

A spirit of despair grips David’s heart in 1 Samuel 27.  He had overcome the temptation to kill Saul in chapter 26, but we find him in chapter 27 struggling with a spirit of pessimism and anxiety (27:1).  Allowing his fear of Saul to become greater than his faith in God’s promises (Proverbs 29:25), David departed from Israel and encamped among the Philistines (27:1-3).  For 16 months, David and his men appeared to prosper in the midst of the Philistines (27:8-11); however, tragedy struck while the men were away from their families when the Amalekites attacked their city, destroying their homes by fire and taking their wives, sons and daughters captive (30:1-4).  Distraught and overcome with grief, the hearts of David’s men became bitter and turned to revenge: “David was greatly distressed; for the people spake of stoning him…” (30:6a).

David had lived away from Israel and the LORD and, for the first time in 16 months, we read “David encouraged himself in the LORD his God” and “enquired at the LORD” (30:6, 8). God answered David’s prayer and restored to him and his men their families and possessions (30:17-19).

One might feel a certain human empathy for Saul in the latter years of his life and reign.  The king is old and the strength and vitality of his youth has faded.  David, the man who has served him faithfully, Saul has made his enemy.  Worse of all, because of his sin and rebellion, Saul knows the LORD is no longer with him (16:14-15).

(c) Paintings Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Paralyzed by a spirit of foreboding (38:5-6) and desperate for a word of reassurance, the king adds to his spiritual failures consulting with a “witch diviner” seeking a consultation from the dead prophet Samuel (28:7-15; Exodus 22:18; Leviticus 19:31).  The LORD allowed Samuel to appear to Saul; however, rather than hope, the prophet warned the battle that would follow against the Philistines would bring the death of Saul and his sons and the throne would pass to David (28:17-19).

1 Samuel 31 brings us to the inevitable, inglorious end of king Saul.  The battle went against Israel and Saul received word his sons were dead and the army was in disarray (31:1-2).  Having suffered a mortal wound from an arrow, Saul commanded his armor bearer to slay him, but he refused.  Knowing he would soon fall into the hands of his enemy, Saul fell upon his own sword (31:3-4).  Adding to his ignoble death was the humiliation that followed for Saul and his sons (1 Samuel 31:8; 1 Chronicles 10:8-10).

1 Samuel 31:8-10 – “And it came to pass on the morrow, when the Philistines came to strip the slain, that they found Saul and his three sons fallen in mount Gilboa. 9  And they cut off his head, and stripped off his armour, and sent into the land of the Philistines round about, to publish it in the house of their idols, and among the people. 10  And they put his armour in the house of Ashtaroth: and they fastened his body to the wall of Bethshan.”

1 Chronicles 10:13-14 leaves no doubt why Saul and his sons suffered such a tragic end: “So Saul died for his transgression which he committed against the LORD, even against the word of the LORD, which he kept not, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit, to enquire of it; 14 And enquired not [no desire to repent] of the LORD: therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David the son of Jesse.”

The life and death of Saul affirm you can be certain, “your sin will find you out” (Numbers 32:23b) and “sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death” (James 1:15b).

Sin and rebellion cost Saul everything…his army (31:1), his sons (31:2), his life (31:3-4) and his honor (31:9-10).   My friend, sin is hard, cruel and merciless.  Sin will destroy your marriage, strip you of your crowning achievements and leave you despairing of life. Sin will rob you of everything you hold dear.

If you are in the midst of sin, it is not too late to turn back to the LORD who is “full of compassion, and gracious, longsuffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth” (Psalm 86:15).

2 Peter 3:9 – “The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.”

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

Caution: Revenge straight ahead!

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Daily reading assignment: 1 Samuel 21-25

Some of the Bible characters in today’s reading in 1 Samuel are not only engaging, but also rich in color and character.  It is impossible for me to adequately cover the spiritual principles and applications found in each chapter; alas, I must focus my attention on but one chapter, 1 Samuel 24.

Revenge, it is said, is “Life’s most subtle temptation.”  Revenge and envy, like conjoined twins, has been the haunt of man since Cain rose up and slew his brother Abel (Genesis 4).  Revenge overtakes us when we nurse an injury we feel was unjust, allowing that injury to fester into a wound of bitterness and, when our enemy is unsuspecting, raises its ugly head in a venomous bite crushing dreams, ruining friendships, and destroying lives, marriages and families.  We would be wise to heed Paul’s admonition to believers in Rome:

Romans 12:19 – “Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.”

In today’s reading, David is a man on the run! From national hero and celebrated warrior to a fugitive hiding in desert caves, David finds himself continually stalked by king Saul who has vowed to kill him.  What began as envy, festered into bitterness provoking the king to attempt to spear David on three occasions.  Realizing Saul would not rest until he is dead, David fled into the wilderness where he would spend the next ten years living in exile.

We find David and his band of 600 men seeking shelter in an oasis named Engedi, a beautiful retreat in the midst of limestone mountains with hundred of caves carved out of the hillsides by periodic rainfalls.  Located in southern Israel and overlooking the western shore of the Dead Sea, Engedi made a perfect hiding place for David (1 Samuel 23:29) until Saul learned he and his men were hiding in its rocky crags (24:1).  Choosing 3,000 men, Saul set out to find and destroy David and his men once and for all (1 Samuel 24:1-22).

With Saul and his army encamped in the valley, David and his men retreated into the darkness of a large cave overlooking Saul’s encampment.  Lacking a delicate way to address the setting, suffice it to say Saul turned David’s cave hideout into a “Royal Porta Potty” to relieve himself (24:3).  With his guards standing outside the cave, Saul was unaware he had retreated into his enemy’s lair and had an audience of hundreds hiding in the darkness of the cave.

David’s men urged him to strike a mortal blow to his enemy (24:4), but his refusal stunned them (24:7).  Indeed, David’s heart was so tender that the mere act of cutting off a section of Saul’s robe troubled him (24:5).

Why? Why was David troubled for having cut a strip of cloth off the king’s robe?  In spite of Saul’s flaws and abuses, David heart was tender toward the king.

1 Samuel 24:6 – “And he said unto his men, The LORD forbid that I should do this thing unto my master, the LORD’S anointed, to stretch forth mine hand against him, seeing he is the anointed of the LORD.”

My friend, if you want to know the character of a man, observe his actions when his enemy is vulnerable.  Vengeance is God’s business (24:8-12).

In spite of the king’s faults, David reflected humility and honored the king in four ways (24:8-10).  The first, he addressed the king with the respect due his office, “My lord the king” (24:8).  The second, he honored the king in his manner when he “stooped with his face to the earth, and bowed himself” (24:8).  The third, he entreated the king with a question, not an accusation when he asked, “Wherefore hearest thou men’s words, saying, Behold, David seeketh thy hurt?” (24:9).  Finally, he proved the evil reports the king had entertained about him were false by his actions…when he had opportunity to kill the king he spared him (24:11).  Rather than revenge, David turned Saul over to the LORD to deal with him (24:12, 15).

Caution: Revenge is the course sin takes when anger and bitterness rule the heart.

Ephesians 4:31-32 – “Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice: 32 And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.”

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith

The absence of “the fear of the LORD” has fostered a culture of pride and carnality in our homes, churches, and schools.

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Daily reading assignment: Job 27-28

Bildad, one of Job’s three “friends”, asserted in Job 25 that men suffer because of unconfessed sins, implying that Job’s sorrows and losses were, in his judgment, because of sin and wickedness.  Job 26 marked the beginning of Job’s defense to Bildad’s judgments and continues the same in Job 27-28.

Professing he has searched his heart and found no sins that would invite God’s judgment, Job is at a loss to understand why God would allow so great a sorrow to shadow his life [remember, Job had been a man of great wealth and the father of seven sons and three daughters before the LORD allowed Satan to test him; a test that ultimately took from Job his wealth, health, and family]. (Job 1-2)  Bildad professed to have wisdom in Job 25, an assertion Job addressed in a series of questions in chapter 28.

Job 28:12, 20 – “But where shall wisdom be found? and where is the place of understanding?… 20  Whence then cometh wisdom? and where is the place of understanding?”

Knowledge might be obtained for the excessive price of an Ivy League education; however, wisdom is priceless and cannot be purchased (28:15-19)!   In the words of 19th century English Baptist preacher Charles Spurgeon, “Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom.”

What is the repository of wisdom and how might it be acquired? The answer: “the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding” (Job 28:28).

Wisdom is found in “the fear of the LORD” (Job 28:28).  Such “fear” is reverential and worshipful.  The “fear of the LORD” is not only an emotional response, but also a practical response that obeys the Law of the LORD and forsakes the way of sin and wickedness (“to depart from evil is understanding” – 28:28b).

Moses commanded Israel to keep the statutes and judgments of God, “for this is your wisdom and your understanding in the sight of the nations” (Deuteronomy 4:5-6).  Hebrew fathers and mothers were to teach their sons the statutes and judgments of God that they would “learn to fear” the LORD (Deuteronomy 4:10).  Israel feared the LORD when the people received the Law of the Lord at Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 5:5).   God’s people are to fear the LORD and delight in His commandments (Psalm 112:1).  We are to fear and reverence the name of the LORD (Psalm 86:11).

In my opinion, the greatest dereliction of duty within 21st century Bible preaching churches and institutions is the failure to instruct youth in the Law and Commandments of the LORD.   A whole generation of pastors, teachers, and evangelists are preaching “GRACE” and “LIBERTY” to the neglect of instructing Millennial sons and daughters in the statutes and judgments of God.

How many preachers can declare, “I have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God” (Acts 20:27)?   The failure to teach the statutes and judgments (Law and Commandments) of God has created a void of knowledge and fostered a liberty that is a license to sin.

The absence of “the fear of the LORD” has fostered a culture of pride and carnality in our homes, churches, and schools.

Copyright 2017 – Travis D. Smith