Tag Archives: Grace

Wisdom’s Appeal to Sinners (Proverbs 7-9)

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 7-9

We are continuing our daily reading in the Proverbs of Solomon with Proverbs 7-9 being the subject of today’s devotional commentary.

Proverbs 7 – The Calamity of Sexual Immorality

“Thou shalt not commit adultery,” the Seventh Commandment, states clearly God’s plan for humanity’s sexuality and the posterity of the human race.  From the beginning, the companionship of one man and one woman for life has never been in doubt (Genesis 1:27-28; 2:18, 20-25).

Human history, however, reveals not only a rejection of marriage, but also the tragic toll of sexual immorality. Crushed dreams, divided hearts, broken families, physical disease, and despair has been the haunt of all who reject the sanctity of marriage. The lesson is indisputable:

Give rein to lusts that cannot be righteously satisfied and you will be consumed by them.

Proverbs 7 serves as a graphic tale of a young man’s folly. Whether a personal observation of the sorrows that followed in the wake of his father’s adultery or a consequence of his own sinful choices, Solomon gives us a portrait that serves as a warning to all who reject godly wisdom and choose the path of immorality. The king warned his son, the house of an adulterer is “the way to hell” (7:27).

Proverbs 8 – Wisdom Anthropomorphized

My theme for Proverbs 8 is expressed in a word consisting of seventeen letters and five syllables. What is the definition of anthropomorphized? It means to take on human characteristics. Wisdom does that in Proverbs 8, and is in my interpretation, the embodiment of the pre-incarnate Son of God, Jesus Christ.

Solomon introduces us to Wisdom in the first three verses of the chapter (8:1-3), and then she (Wisdom) begins to speak throughout the balance of the chapter (8:4-36). You will notice the personification of Wisdom expressed in personal pronouns throughout Proverbs 8.

Proverbs 8:4 – “Unto you, O men, I call.”

Proverbs 8:7 – “My mouth shall speak truth.”

Proverbs 8:12 – “I wisdom dwell with prudence.”

Proverbs 8:17 – “I love them that love me: and those that seek me early shall find me.”

Proverbs 8:34 – “Blessed is the man that heareth me.”

Proverbs 8 concludes with wisdom’s invitation and warning:

Proverbs 8:35-36  For whoso findeth me [Wisdom personified in Jesus Christ] findeth life [spiritual and eternal life – 1 John 5:11], and shall obtain [get] favour [acceptance; good pleasure; goodwill] of the LORD. 36 But he that against me [Christ the Lord] wrongeth [violates] his own soul [life; person; mind; spirit]: all they that hate [to reject; are enemies or foes] me [wisdom] love death [pestilence; ruin; hades].”

Proverbs 9 – Wisdom’s Invitation

Solomon continues his personification of Wisdom in chapter 9 and we find her building a house described as having “seven pillars” (9:1). [In the Scriptures the number seven indicates completeness or wholeness.]

Consider this chapter as an offering of two spiritual scholarships to two opposing schools of thought and philosophy.

The first scholarship is to the University of Godly Wisdom (Proverbs 9:1-6) and the second to the School of Folly (Proverbs 9:13-18). You will notice that Proverbs 9:7-12 serve as transitional verses between the two schools.

As you read Proverbs 9, ponder this question: In what school of thought or philosophy are you enrolled?

Are you enrolled in the University of Godly Wisdom? Are you a student in the School of Folly where gullible, simple men dwell?  [The “simple” are those who lack godly wisdom, are slaves to sin, and follow a course of sorrow, destruction, and eventual death.]

It is not too late to become a student in the LORD’S University of Godly Wisdom by humbling yourself and accepting Jesus Christ as your Savior. Christ taught His followers, “I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst… All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out” (John 6:35, 37).

I invite you, enroll in the University of Godly Wisdom without delay by opening your heart to the Lord.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Proverbs: An Introduction (Proverbs 1-3)

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 1-3

Continuing our study of the life and wisdom of King Solomon, our chronological reading of the Scriptures brings us to “The Proverbs of Solomon,” chapters 1-3.

To author a brief devotional commentary on three chapters of Proverbs is not just a daunting task, it is impossible. In fact, you will find six hundred individual devotional commentaries on my HeartofAShepherd.com website that I have written and hope to one day publish in an electronic book format for personal and group Bible studies.

Rather than attempt the impossible, allow me to share a few introductory thoughts that I hope will prove useful as you read and apply the Proverbs of Solomon to your life.

An Introduction

Solomon, the son of David, reigned as King of Israel in the 10th century B.C.   According to 1 Kings 4:32, the king authored “three thousand proverbs” and his wisdom was so widely hailed “there came of all people to hear the wisdom of Solomon, from all kings of the earth, which had heard of his wisdom” (1 Kings 4:34).  Cherished for their godly wisdom and divine inspiration, many of Solomon’s proverbs were collected and included in the canon of Old Testament Scriptures.

The book of Proverbs is King Solomon’s instructions to his son, a prince of Israel, who would one day be that nation’s king.  Inherent in its pages are teachings, admonitions, exhortations, and general guidelines for conducting one’s life in a wise, God-fearing manner.

What is a proverb?

Boyd’s Bible Dictionary defines a proverb as a “wise utterance.”  Brown-Driver-Biggs Hebrew-English Lexicon describes a proverb as a “brief terse sentence of popular sagacity.”  Webster’s 1913 Unabridged English Dictionary states a proverb is “an old common saying; a phrase which is often repeated; especially, a sentence which briefly and forcibly expresses some practical truth.”

Proverbs are, in essence, trite sayings, rules, and common truths.  Some make the mistake of selectively choosing and applying individual proverbs as though they are universal promises when they are, in fact, simply stated principles that are general statements of truth (one such proverb oft quoted, but misapplied as an unassailable promise is Proverbs 22:6, “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it”).

Solomon’s proverbs often draw upon the agrarian culture of his day and are sometimes simple enough a child might grasp its meaning with little or no explanation.  Some proverbs are provocative in nature, the musings of a king all too aware of the temptations of the palace and the godless character of miscreants who haunted its courts in pursuit of lusts and carnal pleasures.

Like a loving father, twenty-three times the king arrests the attention of the young prince addressing him as “my son”.  With the fervor of a passionate preacher, Solomon’s proverbs “reprove, rebuke, and exhort” (2 Timothy 4:2), sparing no words when describing the way of a fool and admonishing the tragic end of all who follow his path.

With pen in hand, I encourage you to take up your Bible and read Proverbs 1-3, underlining and noting in the margins the practical truths and their application to your life.

With the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Solomon: The Pinnacle of Greatness (1 Kings 3-4)

Scripture Reading – 1 Kings 3-4

In 1 Kings 3-4, Solomon begins to come into his own as the King of Israel. We are given insight into the young king’s gift of administration, his skill as a builder, and his great intellect. While those traits are important in a leader, the most treasured qualities of all are those we find concerning his spiritual character. We read,

“Solomon loved the LORD, walking in the statutes of David his father: only he sacrificed and burnt incense in high places” (1 Kings 3:3).

There was as yet no Temple, and the observation that Solomon was offering sacrifices “in high places” was not a denunciation, but a testimony to his passion and dedication to the LORD.

Why did Solomon journey to Gibeon to offer sacrifice? (3:4)

You might remember how David had celebrated the Ark of the Covenant’s relocation to Jerusalem in 1 Chronicles 15 and how he had constructed a new Tabernacle for the Ark until the Temple was built. While the Ark was no longer in Gibeon (note 3:15), the ancient Mosaic Tabernacle was (2 Chronicles 1:3), and it was there Solomon offered sacrifices to the LORD (3:4).

1 Kings 3:5-15 – Solomon’s Petition for Wisdom

While worshiping at Gibeon, “the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night: and God said, Ask what I shall give thee” (3:5). A pleasing petition follows where, unlike the bent of most men, Solomon evidenced a humility that is rare among leaders. Conscious of his youth and inexperience (3:7) and overwhelmed by the challenge of leading a great nation, Solomon prayed,

1 Kings 3:9 – Give therefore thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern between good and bad: for who is able to judge this thy so great a people?

The LORD was pleased with Solomon’s demeanor and his request. God not only promised to answer the king’s prayer, but also to bless him with “riches, and honour” so that no king was be his equal in all the world (3:13).

Remembering His covenant with David, the LORD promised Solomon he would be blessed with a long life, if he would walk in the ways of the LORD, and obey His Laws and Commandments (3:14).

1 Kings 4 – Solomon’s Leadership, Wealth, and Wisdom

There is much to compliment Solomon as the King of Israel in this chapter. We find a record of his military leaders (4:1-6), the officers of his court, the territories to which they were assigned (4:7-19), and the breadth of the land that he ruled (4:20-22). Also outlined was the size of his royal court that is shown in the daily provisions that were required for his palace (4:22-28), as well as, his stables that comprised “forty thousand stalls of horses for his chariots, and twelve thousand horsemen” (4:26).

The wisdom, intellect, and poetic skills of this great king are not left in doubt (4:29-33), for “there came of all people to hear the wisdom of Solomon, from all kings of the earth, which had heard of his wisdom” (4:34).

I close with a tragic observation that will soon be borne out as we follow Solomon’s life and reign.

Although he was a man of unparalleled wisdom in his youth, he died having departed from his love for the LORD, for when he was old “his wives turned away his heart after other gods: and his heart was not perfect with the LORD his God, as was the heart of David his father” (1 Kings 11:4).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

I’ve Got Happiness! How ‘bout You? (Psalms 111-118)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 111-118

Today’s Scripture reading entails eight glorious chapters in the Book of Psalms; however, I will limit this devotional commentary to Psalm 111 and Psalm 112.

Psalm 111 – Getting Wisdom

Three of today’s psalms begin with the same theme and call to worship: “Praise ye the LORD”(Psalms 111:1; 112:1; 113:1).

In essence, “Praise ye the LORD” is an expression of thanksgiving that boasts in the LORD Who is the Eternal, Self-existent God of creation. The psalmist asserts he will “Praise the LORD” with his “whole heart” – his mind, thoughts, and understanding undivided and focused on Him (111:1).

His praise and thanksgiving will be declared not only in the midst of those who are numbered among the “upright” (meaning those who obey the LORD’S Law and Commandments), but also in the midst of all the people (“the congregation” – 111:1).

In what will the psalmist praise the LORD? His meditations are on His works, the wonder and expanse of His creation (111:2) and “His righteousness”— for He is just, and “is gracious and full of compassion” (111:4b).

Believer, do you want to be numbered among the wise? Do you desire to be a man or woman of discernment and understanding? Remember this principle:

Psalm 111:10 – The fear [reverence; awe that begets righteous behavior] of the LORD is the beginning [is fundamental; foundational; most important thing] of wisdom: a good understanding [discretion; ] have all they that do [make; perform] his commandments: his praise [giving thanks] endureth [stands; is established] for ever [eternity].

Psalm 112 – Four Qualities of a “Blessed” Man

Psalm 112, like Psalm 111, begins with a word of praise to the LORD and an affirmation that the man who “feareth” [trembles; reveres] the LORD is “Blessed” [happy] because he “delighteth [desires; takes pleasure] greatly in His Commandments [Law; ordinances; precepts]” (112:1).

Notice there are four essential characteristics of a “Happy” man in Psalm 112: A “Happy” man is Blessed (112:1), Upright (112:4), Good (112:5-6a) and Righteous (112:7-9).

A man is happy and blessed because he recognizes he is the object of God’s grace (i.e. unmerited favor). 

Why is he the object of God’s grace?  Because he “feareth the LORD” (lit. reveres the name and rejoices in the character of the LORD) and “delighteth greatly in His commandments” (112:1c).  Such a man finds the Law and Commandments of the LORD a delight (Psalm 1:1-2), and the overflow of God’s grace in that righteous man’s life magnifies his influence (112:2) and blessed state (should his children follow his righteous path).

Secondly, a man is happy and “blessed” when he is “upright,” meaning just, righteous, a man who fears and reveres the LORD (112:4). 

God’s people are not spared from dark days, for they too suffer sickness, death of loved ones, disappointments, betrayals and broken promises. The righteous, however, have an assurance: “there ariseth light in the darkness” (112:4a).  David observed the same, writing, “weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning” (Psalm 30:5).

Believers are not spared dark days; however, they are assured the light of the LORD will pierce the darkness. What a precious promise! When we find we are “in the darkness,” the LORD promises He is “gracious, and full of compassion, and righteous” (112:4b).

Another quality of a “Happy” man is that he is a “good man” (112:5). 

We notice four traits evidenced in a “good” man’s character (112:5-6).

He is gracious in his demeanor (pleasant and pleasing – 112:5a). He is generous (he lendeth to those in need – 112:5b). He exercises “good sense,” guiding “his affairs with discretion” (112:5). He is well “grounded,” for a good man “shall not be moved for ever” (112:6a).

Lastly, a “Happy” man is “righteous” (112:7-9). 

We find three qualities of this righteous man in verses 7-9. He is fearless, “he shall not be afraid of evil tidings” (112:7a), for he has a settled confidence in the LORD.  His heart is firm, “fixed, trusting in the LORD” (112:7b), and “shall not be afraid” (112:8b). He is freehearted, generous and giving to the poor (112:9). A righteous man is not a hoarder of riches, but a steward of God’s blessings and a conduit for ministering to those in need.

I conclude today’s devotional inviting you to take note of the wicked man’s response to the Happy man who is Blessed, Upright, Good and Righteous:

Psalm 112:10 – The wicked [immoral; ungodly] shall see [look; behold; regard] it, and be grieved [troubled; provoked; angry]; he shall gnash [i.e. grate or grind] with his teeth, and melt away [faint; be discouraged]: the desire [longing; delight; greed] of the wicked [guilty; immoral; ungodly] shall perish [be destroyed].”

Envy! The joy and happiness of the righteous is a grief, a sorrow to the wicked who grind their teeth like rabid dogs and “melt away,” defeated and consumed by their envy (112:10c).

In the words of King David, “For the LORD knoweth the way of the righteous: but the way of the ungodly shall perish” (Psalm 1:6).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Hillsdale’s Sunday Memorial Day Weekend Service: “The Guidance, Protection, and Loving Care of My Shepherd”

You are invited to Hillsdale’s Sunday Memorial Day Weekend Service, this Sunday, May 24, 2020.

9:45 AM Service – Youth Pastor Justin Jarrett will speak in the Teen\Family Bible Study as he continues his series in the Book of James. This week’s study is titled, Taming Our Twisted Tongues from James 3:1-12. (Please note the entrance doors to the building will open at 9:40 AM and will be closed at 9:50 AM. Per guidelines, please go directly to the auditorium.)
10:30 AM Service – Our Memorial Day worship service will begin promptly and doors to our building will reopen at 10:15 AM and be closed at 10:45 AM. The service will open with a video tribute to those who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation and be followed by the pastoral staff singing the Navy Hymn, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save.”
Pastor Smith will be continuing his “Coronavirus Series” from Psalm 23. The focus this week is Psalm 23:4, “The Guidance, Protection, and Loving Care of My Shepherd.”
The following is an excerpt from this Sunday’s bulletin: “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” (Edmund Burke)

Anglo/Irish author, statesman and orator, Edmund Burke, is credited with many of my favorite political and philosophical quotes. Burke’s observation regarding the “triumph of evil” when “good men do nothing” is cited with various wordings; however, the essence of his quote is that:

When good men are silent and do nothing; evil men will triumph in the moral, spiritual and political arenas.

I fear that day has come upon us, our nation, and our world. The wicked champion egregious sins and depravity marches in the streets under banners that assert freedom at the sacrifice of lives, individual liberty and happiness.

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain is credited with a “do nothing” peace agreement that he signed with Adolf Hitler in 1938. Chamberlain returned to England and announced that he had negotiated with Hitler an agreement that would give all Europe, “Peace with honour…Peace for our time.” One year later, Germany’s army invaded Poland and plunged Europe, and eventually the world into World War II and a conflict that would take the lives of 85 million people, including 6 million Jews.

This Memorial weekend we take time to honor those men and women who did not stand by in silence when our nation went to war. Soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines refused to be numbered among the “do nothing” crowd that was so quick to dismiss their honor, and criticize those who made a difference, often at the sacrifice of their youth and their lives.

Warning: While “We the People” choose to “do nothing,” America continues to decline morally, spiritually, and politically. When evil is emboldened, freedom erodes. In the words of the 19th century French philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville:

America is great because she is good. If America ceases to be good, America will cease to be great.” 

With love and the heart of a shepherd,

Pastor Travis D. Smith

Senior Pastor

www.HeartofAShepherd.com

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Give All Praise, for the LORD is King (Psalms 108-110)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 108-110

Today’s Scripture reading is three psalms, all of which are attributed to King David.  For the sake of brevity, I will introduce each and limit this commentary.

Psalm 108 – A Psalm of Praise and Thanksgiving

David declares, “O God, my heart is fixed” (108:1). The “heart” in Scripture is more than a physical organ; it is, in its broadest sense a reference to one’s mind, thoughts, and is the seat of the emotions.

When King Solomon taught his son, “Trust in the LORD with all thine heart” (Proverbs 3:5a), it was a exhortation for him to give God his whole being: every thought, every aspiration, and every desire devoted to the LORD.

On what was David’s heart fixed?

Psalm 108:1-3 – O God, my heart is fixed; I will sing and give praise [lit. sing songs of praise], even with my glory [David was king; however, he was unashamedly devoted to giving his glory to worshiping the LORD]. 2  Awake [Be aroused; stirred], psaltery and harp: I myself will awake early [morning; at dawn]. 3  I will praise [give thanks] thee, O LORD, among the people: and I will sing praises unto thee among the nations.

David’s heart was resolved to give praise to God! The king broke into a song of praise and commanded both voice and instruments to praise the LORD (108:1-3). We are reminded once again the importance of song and instruments in worshiping the LORD.

Psalm 109 – The “Iscariot Psalm”

Psalm 109 and Psalm 110 are Messianic psalms. Psalm 109 is known as the “Iscariot Psalm” because it gives a prophetic picture of Judas Iscariot’s betrayal of Jesus Christ (i.e. “Jesus the Messiah”).

I hope to revisit Psalm 109 in greater detail in another year, but I invite you to ponder several prophetic statements in this psalm that were fulfilled in Christ’s betrayal, humiliation, and death. For instance, the chief priests and Sanhedrin fulfilled Psalm 109:2 when false accusers came and alleged Jesus had committed blasphemy (Matthew 26:59).

When we read, “they have rewarded me evil for good, and hatred for my love” (Psalm 109:5), we remember Pilate’s judgment of Jesus saying, “I find no fault in him” (John 19:4, 6).

Psalm 109:6-9 prophesy that Satan would enter “a wicked man” and was fulfilled on the night Judas betrayed Jesus (John 13:27). We know Judas went out and hanged himself and in so doing fulfilled the prophecy, “Let his days be few; and another take his office” (109:8). Acts 1:20-26 informs us that Judas’ office as a disciple and apostle passed to a believer named Matthias, and thus fulfilled the prophecy.

Psalm 110 – The Priest King

Psalm 110 is a Messianic psalm and gives us a portrait that could only be fulfilled in Christ. Psalm 110:1 makes it clear that David was not talking about himself or any other earthly potentate.

We read: “The LORD [Jehovah; Eternal, Self-Existent God] said unto my Lord [Master; Sovereign], Sit thou at my right hand [not only a place of privilege, but also one of strength], until I make thine enemies thy footstool.” (Psalm 110:1)

Who was David addressing as sovereign? The Jews believed Psalm 110:1 was a reference to the coming Messiah (Matthew 22:44).

We read in the Gospel of Mark, “So then after the Lord had spoken unto them [His disciples], he was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God” (Mark 16:19). In his letter to the church in Ephesus, the apostle Paul leaves no doubt that Jesus Christ is at God the Father’s right hand (Ephesians 1:20, 22).

Ephesians 1:20, 22 – “20 Which he [God the Father] wrought in Christ, when he [God the Father] raised him [Jesus Christ] from the dead, and set him [Jesus Christ] at his [God the Father] own right hand in the heavenly places22  And hath put all things under his [Jesus Christ]  feet, and gave him [Jesus Christ]  to be the head over all things to the church.”

Who has the privilege to sit at the right hand of the LORD, God of heaven?

Only one, Christ Jesus the LORD.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Cry of a Wounded Soul (Psalms 5, 38, 41-42)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 5, 38, 41-42

Our devotional commentary is taken from Psalm 41 where we find David at a low point in life, physically and emotionally. The theme of the psalm is, “God’s Care of the Poor” and scholars believe the king penned the song when he was ill or recovering from sickness.

Remembering the psalms were sung by priests and Levites during worship in the Tabernacle and later in the Temple, I invite you to notice four stanzas.

The first stanza is a Beatitude that opens with the word, “Blessed” (41:1-3).

Psalm 41:1-3 – “Blessed [Happy] is he that considereth [understands] the poor [weak; needy]: the LORDwill deliver [save] him in time of trouble [sin; wickedness; evil]2  The LORD will preserve [keep; guard] him, and keep him alive [sustain]; and he shall be blessed [prosperous] upon the earth: and thou wilt not deliver [abandon] him unto the will  [desire] of his enemies [adversary; foe]3 The LORD will strengthen [support; uphold] him upon the bed [couch; canopy] of languishing [sorrow]: thou wilt make [turn; overthrow] all his bed in his sickness [disease; malady].”

Having shown compassion to the poor, David rehearsed the LORD’s promise to hear and heed the cries of His people in their hour of need (41:1). The king remembered God keeps watch over His people and delivers them out of trouble in His time (41:2). Betrayed by those he loved, David had tossed and turned upon his bed as sorrows and disappointments washed over his soul (41:3).

The second stanza is a penitent prayer of confession and a cry for God’s grace (41:4). He prayed,

Psalm 41:4 – “4  I said, LORD, be merciful [gracious; show favor] unto me: heal [cure; purify] my soul [life]; for I have sinned [committed sin; guilty] against thee.”

The king had spent sleepless nights praying and searching his heart. He confessed his sin and pleaded for God’s grace, forgiveness and restoration (41:4).

In the third stanza, David rehearsed the sorrows and betrayals he had suffered (41:5-9).

Psalm 41:5-6 – “Mine enemies speak [charge] evil [sin; wickedness] of me, When shall he die [be slain], and his name [fame; honor] perish [destroyed]6  And if he [enemy; adversary] come to see [look; behold] me, he speaketh [declare] vanity [deceit; lies]: his heart gathereth [collect; heap; take up] iniquity [sin; wickedness] to itself; when he goeth [go forth] abroad [in the streets], he telleth [speak; say; talk] it.”

All who serve the LORD and walk with integrity will inevitably face such pain (41:5-7). Distressed by the sorrow of rejection and the bitter anguish of betrayal, David continued:

Psalm 41:7-8 – “7 All that hate me whisper [mumble] together [i.e. in chorus] against me: against me do they devise [imagine; fabricate] my hurt. 8  An evil [wicked] disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him: and now that he lieth [lays down] he shall rise up no more.”

What dismay, knowing embittered souls were plotting and bidding their time awaiting the day they could take satisfaction in the fall of the king (41:8).

Psalm 41:9 –  “Yea, mine own familiar [close] friend, in whom I trusted [a confidant], which did eat [devour; consume] of my bread [food; meal], hath lifted up his heel [foot] against me [magnified himself].

Psalm 41:9 gives us insight into the personal nature of the treachery that had befallen David.  [I believe verse 9 is also a Messianic prophecy that was fulfilled when Judas betrayed Christ].

David’s adversary wanted to grind the king under his heel and humiliate him.  His enemy waited for the satisfaction of the king’s demise.  Although not identified by name, I believe David’s enemy was either Absalom, the king’s own son (2 Samuel 15) or Ahithophel, the king’s trusted counselor who had joined in Absalom’s rebellion (2 Samuel 16:23).

The fourth stanza of Psalm 41 concludes with a doxology of praise (41:10-13).

Psalm 41:10-13 – “But thou, O LORD, be merciful [be gracious; show me favor] unto me, and raise me up, that I may requite them. [reward them for the evil his enemies had done] 11  By this I know that thou favourest [delight in] me, because mine enemy doth not triumph over me. 12  And as for me, thou upholdest me in mine integrity [innocence], and settest me before thy face [presence] for ever. 13  Blessed be the LORD God of Israel from everlasting, and to everlasting. Amen, and Amen.”

David’s hope was renewed when he turned his thoughts from his hurts and disappointments to the LORD.

Let’s take a lesson from David’s life: God is just and He favors those who put their trust in Him (41:11-12).

Copyright 2019 – Travis D. Smith