Tag Archives: Ministry

The Bible Stands…Though the Earth May Crumble (Psalms 119)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 119

Psalm 119 is a beloved psalm that is the longest of the psalms consisting of 176 verses! Although the author is not named, I believe King David wrote this eloquent song whose subject is the Word of God, the Law, the Commandments, its precepts, and the Testimonies of the LORD.

Undertaking a devotional commentary based on Psalm 119 is at the least daunting, if not impossible. Understanding a complete reading of the psalm will in itself be demanding; I therefore, will limit my effort to an introduction and trust you will read with pen or pencil in hand.

For the sake of introduction and grasping the organization of the psalm, I quote from Charles Spurgeon’s commentary titled “The Treasury of David.” Spurgeon writes of Psalm 119: “The Psalm is alphabetical. Eight stanzas commence with one [Hebrew] letter, and then another eight with the next [Hebrew] letter, and so the whole Psalm proceeds by octonaries [each section consisting of eight lines] quite through the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet.” [You will notice a Hebrew letter is the heading for each eight-verse section.]

Knowing the primary subject of Psalm 119 is the Word of God, I challenge you to consider the motivation for reading, studying, and meditating in God’s Word daily.

You will notice numerous words that define the “Word of God” throughout the psalm. The Word, Law, Judgments, Statutes, Precepts, Commandments, and Testimonies are all references to the whole body of Scripture.

Why should you read the Bible daily? I could cite many reasons for being a disciplined student of God’s Word, but I will limit myself to three: Hope, Comfort, and Direction.

Psalm 119:49 states that “the word…caused me to hope.” Psalm 119:50, the Word “is my comfort in my affliction.” Psalm 119:59, the Word of God is my spiritual GPS, for “I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies.”

I pray that David’s passion for the Word of God will be your testimony.

Psalm 119:129Thy testimonies [witness; admonitions; ordinances] are wonderful [marvelous; astonishing]: therefore doth my soul [life; person] keep [preserve; guard] them.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

I’ve Got Happiness! How ‘bout You? (Psalms 111-118)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 111-118

Today’s Scripture reading entails eight glorious chapters in the Book of Psalms; however, I will limit this devotional commentary to Psalm 111 and Psalm 112.

Psalm 111 – Getting Wisdom

Three of today’s psalms begin with the same theme and call to worship: “Praise ye the LORD”(Psalms 111:1; 112:1; 113:1).

In essence, “Praise ye the LORD” is an expression of thanksgiving that boasts in the LORD Who is the Eternal, Self-existent God of creation. The psalmist asserts he will “Praise the LORD” with his “whole heart” – his mind, thoughts, and understanding undivided and focused on Him (111:1).

His praise and thanksgiving will be declared not only in the midst of those who are numbered among the “upright” (meaning those who obey the LORD’S Law and Commandments), but also in the midst of all the people (“the congregation” – 111:1).

In what will the psalmist praise the LORD? His meditations are on His works, the wonder and expanse of His creation (111:2) and “His righteousness”— for He is just, and “is gracious and full of compassion” (111:4b).

Believer, do you want to be numbered among the wise? Do you desire to be a man or woman of discernment and understanding? Remember this principle:

Psalm 111:10 – The fear [reverence; awe that begets righteous behavior] of the LORD is the beginning [is fundamental; foundational; most important thing] of wisdom: a good understanding [discretion; ] have all they that do [make; perform] his commandments: his praise [giving thanks] endureth [stands; is established] for ever [eternity].

Psalm 112 – Four Qualities of a “Blessed” Man

Psalm 112, like Psalm 111, begins with a word of praise to the LORD and an affirmation that the man who “feareth” [trembles; reveres] the LORD is “Blessed” [happy] because he “delighteth [desires; takes pleasure] greatly in His Commandments [Law; ordinances; precepts]” (112:1).

Notice there are four essential characteristics of a “Happy” man in Psalm 112: A “Happy” man is Blessed (112:1), Upright (112:4), Good (112:5-6a) and Righteous (112:7-9).

A man is happy and blessed because he recognizes he is the object of God’s grace (i.e. unmerited favor). 

Why is he the object of God’s grace?  Because he “feareth the LORD” (lit. reveres the name and rejoices in the character of the LORD) and “delighteth greatly in His commandments” (112:1c).  Such a man finds the Law and Commandments of the LORD a delight (Psalm 1:1-2), and the overflow of God’s grace in that righteous man’s life magnifies his influence (112:2) and blessed state (should his children follow his righteous path).

Secondly, a man is happy and “blessed” when he is “upright,” meaning just, righteous, a man who fears and reveres the LORD (112:4). 

God’s people are not spared from dark days, for they too suffer sickness, death of loved ones, disappointments, betrayals and broken promises. The righteous, however, have an assurance: “there ariseth light in the darkness” (112:4a).  David observed the same, writing, “weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning” (Psalm 30:5).

Believers are not spared dark days; however, they are assured the light of the LORD will pierce the darkness. What a precious promise! When we find we are “in the darkness,” the LORD promises He is “gracious, and full of compassion, and righteous” (112:4b).

Another quality of a “Happy” man is that he is a “good man” (112:5). 

We notice four traits evidenced in a “good” man’s character (112:5-6).

He is gracious in his demeanor (pleasant and pleasing – 112:5a). He is generous (he lendeth to those in need – 112:5b). He exercises “good sense,” guiding “his affairs with discretion” (112:5). He is well “grounded,” for a good man “shall not be moved for ever” (112:6a).

Lastly, a “Happy” man is “righteous” (112:7-9). 

We find three qualities of this righteous man in verses 7-9. He is fearless, “he shall not be afraid of evil tidings” (112:7a), for he has a settled confidence in the LORD.  His heart is firm, “fixed, trusting in the LORD” (112:7b), and “shall not be afraid” (112:8b). He is freehearted, generous and giving to the poor (112:9). A righteous man is not a hoarder of riches, but a steward of God’s blessings and a conduit for ministering to those in need.

I conclude today’s devotional inviting you to take note of the wicked man’s response to the Happy man who is Blessed, Upright, Good and Righteous:

Psalm 112:10 – The wicked [immoral; ungodly] shall see [look; behold; regard] it, and be grieved [troubled; provoked; angry]; he shall gnash [i.e. grate or grind] with his teeth, and melt away [faint; be discouraged]: the desire [longing; delight; greed] of the wicked [guilty; immoral; ungodly] shall perish [be destroyed].”

Envy! The joy and happiness of the righteous is a grief, a sorrow to the wicked who grind their teeth like rabid dogs and “melt away,” defeated and consumed by their envy (112:10c).

In the words of King David, “For the LORD knoweth the way of the righteous: but the way of the ungodly shall perish” (Psalm 1:6).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Wise Pour Themselves into Those Who Will Eventually Succeed Them (2 Samuel 24, 1 Chronicles 21-22; Psalm 30)

Scripture Reading – 2 Samuel 24, 1 Chronicles 21-22; Psalm 30

Today’s Scripture reading brings us to the conclusion of our study in 2 Samuel and is a parallel of the same events recorded in 1 Chronicles 21-22. (The record in the chronicles gives us additional details.)

2 Samuel 24

We find David as an old man, and the shepherd boy of Bethlehem was only a memory. The king is now in the latter years of his life and reign as the king of Israel.

The opening verses of 2 Samuel 24 will no doubt challenge some to wonder why the LORD would be angry with Israel, move David to take a census of his army, and then turn about and be angry with David for doing so (24:1-10). Remember the LORD never tempts man to sin (James 1:13), but He does use the natural inclination of a man’s heart to providentially accomplish His will and purpose.

General Joab, the captain of David’s army, cautiously questioned the king’s motive, “Why doth my lord the king delight in this thing?” (24:3) Joab knew the king’s command for a census was an act of pride that might prove to be a provocation of God’s judgment.

As soon as the sum of the fighting men of Israel was delivered, David’s heart was convicted, and he confessed, “I have sinned greatly in that I have done: and now, I beseech thee, O LORD, take away the iniquity of thy servant; for I have done very foolishly” (24:10). God is just, and the consequences of David’s sin would not be dismissed by the LORD. We read, “the word of the LORD came unto the prophet Gad, David’s seer” (24:11).

Gad was given a message that demanded the king choose one of three judgments that would come upon Israel because of David’s sin: seven years of famine, three months pf being overrun and pursued by adversaries, or three days pestilence (24:12-13). David chose three days of pestilence, reasoning he would rather trust in God’s mercies than be pursued by an enemy (24:14).

2 Samuel 24:15 – “So the LORD sent a pestilence upon Israel from the morning even to the time appointed: and there died of the people from Dan even to Beersheba seventy thousand men.”

Seventy thousand were dead, but had the LORD not been restrained by His mercy, even Jerusalem would have suffered His wrath (24:16). David had prayed as the angel of the LORD approached Jerusalem and made intercession for his people praying, “Lo, I have sinned, and I have done wickedly: but these sheep, what have they done? let thine hand, I pray thee, be against me, and against my father’s house” (24:17).

Bearing the weight of his guilt and realizing the consequences of his sin had befallen the nation, David interceded and asked for God’s judgment to fall upon him and his household rather than His people (24:17).

The prophet Gad returned with a message from the LORD instructing David to buy the “threshingfloor of Araunah the Jebusite (the Jebusites being the original inhabitants of Jerusalem)” and build an altar there (24:18). [Note – 1 Chronicles 21:18 names one “Ornan” as the owner of the threshingfloor; they are the same man.]

Seeing the king and hearing his desire to buy his threshingfloor, Araunah offered not only the land, but also his oxen and threshing instruments as a gift to David (24:20-23).

The king refused Araunah’s offer and confessed, “I will surely buy it of thee at a price: neither will I offer burnt offerings unto the LORD my God of that which doth cost me nothing” (24:24).

David purchased the threshing floor of Araunah, and sacrificed to the LORD the oxen he had purchased. According to 1 Chronicles 21:26, the LORD sent fire from heaven and consumed the oxen as a sign David’s offering was accepted and God’s wrath was satisfied (1 Chronicles 21:26).

You might wonder what became of the land David purchased. The threshingfloor of Araunah was the same place where Abraham had offered his son Isaac (Genesis 22). It would also be where Solomon will build the Temple (1 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 3:1).

1 Chronicles 22

David, knowing the years of his life were drawing to a close, devoted himself to preparing workmen and materials that would be required for Solomon to build the Temple (1 Chronicles 22:1-19). David instructed Solomon and imparted to his son his duty to embrace God’s promises and build the Temple in Jerusalem (22:6-16).

Leaving no doubt who should be his heir and the next king, David “made Solomon his son king over Israel” (23:1) and set forward an organization of the priests and Levites who were to serve in the Temple (23:2-32; 24:1-31).

There are many lessons we can take from today’s study; however, I will leave you with one:

David had accepted that his earthly life would soon be passed, and not only  prepared his son to be king, but also charged Solomon with the privilege for which God had chosen him… “build an house for the LORD God of Israel” (1 Chronicles 22:6-11).

Psalm 90:10 – “The days of our years are threescore years and ten [70 years]; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years [80 years], yet is their strength [i.e. pride] labour [toil; grief; misery] and sorrow [mourning]; for it is soon [i.e. hurry; too soon] cut off [passed], and we fly away [i.e. our years take flight].”

Wise men and women pour their lives into those who will eventually succeed them!

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“You Call that Worship Music?” (Psalms 95, 97-99)

Scripture Reading – Psalms 95, 97-99

Our Scripture reading for today is four psalms of praise. Though the author of the psalms is not identified, most scholars assign them to David because of their style and content. We know David authored Psalm 95 because the writer of Hebrews quoted the psalm and identified the king as its author (Hebrews 4:7).

Today’s psalms are too rich for one devotional commentary to adequately address them all; therefore. I will limit this devotion to Psalm 98.

Psalm 98 – “Sing Unto the LORD a New Song”

Like Psalm 97, I believe the theme of Psalm 98 is the Second Coming of Christ. Hymnwriter and preacher Isaac Watts, cited Psalm 98 as the inspiration of his hymn, “Joy to the World.” Although most often sung as a celebration of Christ’s birth, “Joy to the World” is in fact a celebration of Christ’s Second Coming.

Psalm 98 is an invitation to worship the LORD in song, rejoicing in His salvation and righteousness (98:2). Let us consider the instructions in worship music we find in this psalm as a basis for judging the music style your church has implemented in its worship services.

We find that Psalm 98 consists of three stanzas, each three verses in length. The first is a call for Israel to worship and rejoice in the LORD (98:1-3). The psalmist writes,

Psalm 98:1 – O sing unto the LORD a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory.

What is this “new song?” (98:1-3)

It is a victory song, for the LORD through His strength and power had given His chosen people salvation (98:1-2a). It is a song of redemption and praise for God’s grace (98:2b). It is a song praising the LORD for His faithfulness for He had not forgotten Israel.

Do you realize of all ancient people, the Jews are the only identifiable people from ancient times? The smallest, most insignificant people in all the earth have been preserved by the LORD.

The second stanza calls upon all nations of the earth to worship the LORD (98:4-6).

As one who loves music, and in particular congregational singing and choral anthems, notice with me that singing and playing on instruments was an essential part of worshipping the LORD.

The musicians who ministered in the Temple were trained, skilled, and dedicated musicians. The sound of their voices and instruments was not noise, but an energetic expression in music and song. The literal meaning of “noise” in vss. 4 and 6 is a “shout” or cry or triumph.

The music of the Tabernacle and Temple was never meant to entertain the masses or the congregation. The focus of worship music was the LORD, and His holiness was reflected in both words and music. The singers and musicians did not perform for the applause of the people. Singers were accompanied by string instruments (the harp, vs. 5) and wind instruments (trumpets and coronet, vs. 6). The focus of worship was “the LORD, the King” (98:6).

The final stanza in Psalm 98 calls on all Creation to worship the LORD (98:7-9).

All creation will rejoice (95:7-8) and be freed from the curse of sin when the LORD comes to set up His millennial kingdom. Romans 8:18-25 reveals the devastating effect of man’s sin on creation. Creation awaits its deliverance from the curse of sin (Romans 8:19), but will be delivered “from the bondage of corruption” (Romans 8:21) when the LORD comes again.

Hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and yes, pandemics remind us that “creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together” (Romans 8:22) until the LORD comes to set up His earthly kingdom. He will right the wrongs for He is “to judge the earth” and will judge the earth in His righteousness (98:9).

An Observation

The Book of Psalms is a compilation of songs of praise and worship that was employed in daily worship in the Temple. While nothing took the primacy of reading and teaching God’s Word, the centrality of instrumental music and song is obvious throughout the Psalms and in other passages of Scripture in the Bible (Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16-17).

Sadly, I fear today’s church has taken the command, “Make a joyful noise unto the LORD…make a loud noise” literally and not figuratively. While the priests and Levites were dedicated and consecrated to serve the LORD and lead God’s people in earnest worship, today’s “hip-worship leaders” evidence a greater affinity for the world than the holiness of God. Employing every music genre of the 21st century world, the church’s attempt to satisfy the palate of carnal Christians and a secular culture’s demand for entertainment has come at the sacrifice of sincere worship.

Challenge: – Make Colossians 3:16-17 the standard for your worship music.

Colossians 3:16-1716  Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. 17  And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“Saying Grace” – A Prayer of Thanksgiving (Psalm 65-67; 69-70)

Scripture Reading – Psalm 65-67; 69-70

Psalm 65 – A Psalm of Thanksgiving for the Grace, Greatness, and Goodness of God

David introduces the psalm acknowledging that the LORD is worthy of praise because He hears and answers prayer (65:2). The King confessed that sin hinders prayer (for “iniquities prevail against me”), but the LORD purges sin, and blesses those who seek Him (65:3b-4).

Reflecting on God’s sovereignty over all creation (65:5-8), David praised the LORD for providing rain and running streams that quench the thirst of creation and provide green pastures and grains so that all nature rejoices (65:9-13).

Prayer and gratitude for rain and rushing streams is nearly foreign to the 21st century man. Most of us give little thought to the requirement of life-sustaining water. In an agrarian society, however, the need of rain and water was a relentless concern. Livestock depended on pastures for grazing and a good harvest of grain was not only the livelihood of most families, it was life itself!

“Who would like to say grace?”

I have not heard that phrase in years, but I remember the elderly from my childhood asking, “Who would like to say grace?” or “Who would like to say the blessing?”

To “Pray Grace” was to offer a prayer of thanksgiving for the bounty of God’s blessings, and in particular, for the meal we were about to consume. To pray at mealtimes is to openly recognize the LORD as the provider and the source of all blessings.

Psalm 65 concludes with David acknowledging the LORD for His grace and blessings.  Might I encourage you to do the same?

If “saying grace” is not a practice in your home, it should be. Every meal should begin with you bowing your head, thanking God for His “GRACE.” Remember, the sun, wind, and rain all come from Him!

Psalm 66 – “Make a joyful noise unto God” (Psalm 66:1).

Psalm 66 opens with an invitation for all the nations of the earth to praise and worship the LORD (66:1-7).  The next section of the psalm is an invitation to Israel, God’s chosen people, to praise the LORD (66:8-12).  Beginning with Psalm 66:13, David’s focus is personal as he declares, “I will go into thy house [the Tabernacle] with burnt offerings: I will pay thee my vows, 14 Which my lips have uttered, and my mouth hath spoken, when I was in trouble” (66:13-14).

Have you made a promise to the LORD in a time of trouble? Did you vow to the LORD when you were under conviction? Do you remember responding to the LORD and praying you would give him your heart?

What? You forgot? Did you know the LORD is omniscient; He never forgets our vows, promises, and decisions.

Forgiveness: What a blessed promise!

Psalm 66:1818  If I regard [see; perceive; i.e. unwilling to confess] iniquity [sin; wickedness] in my heart, the Lord will not hear [hearken; listen] me:

David concludes Psalm 66 reflecting on the LORD’s mercies, grace, and willingness to hear his prayers and forgive his sin. The king had suffered the fate of men who “regard iniquity,” and experienced the silence of heaven.

Friend, please don’t risk a seared conscience and a hardened heart. The LORD is longsuffering, patient and willing to forgive our sins if we will confess and forsake them.

1 John 1:9 – If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Joy of Brotherly Love (Psalm 133)

Scripture Reading – Psalm 133

I am unsure why today’s scripture reading assignment consists of only one brief Psalm; however, it is poetic, beautiful, and inspiring.

Psalm 133 is ascribed to David as “A Song of Degrees” (the same inscription found in Psalms 120-134). Scholars suggest the “degrees” referred to the ascension of pilgrims coming up to Jerusalem for one of the Hebrew festivals. The same scholars surmise the psalms were sung by believers making their pilgrimage to the Tabernacle in David’s time, and later to the Temple after its construction during Solomon’s reign.

I am of a different opinion. Understanding the psalms were songs of worship led by the priests and Levites in the Temple, I believe the psalms inscribed as “A Song of Degrees” were sung by the priests as they ascended the steps of the Temple Mount to offer sacrifices and entered the Temple to worship the LORD.

Without any more adorning on my part, consider the beauty of this psalm as a celebration of the joy of brotherly love and unity among God’s people.

Psalm 133:1 – Behold, how good [precious; pleasing] and how pleasant [sweet; charming; delightful] it is for brethren [of kindred spirit] to dwell together [alike; altogether] in unity [togetherness]!

We are by nature beings who long for fellowship, and when that fellowship is sweetened with the joy of unity and mutual love for the LORD, there is nothing sweeter.

What is the nature of this love that bonds and unites the hearts of believers?

Psalm 133:22  It is like the precious [pleasing] ointment [oil; i.e. olive oil often perfumed] upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron’s beard: that went down to the skirts of his garments [the robes worn by the high priest];

Brotherly love is an abundant love, an overflowing love like the anointing oil that ran from Aaron’s head, down his beard, and over his garments. Like the sweet scent the high priest carried on his beard and robes, so is the lingering sweet fragrance of brotherly love and fellowship.

Psalm 133:33  As the dew of Hermon [a mountain north of Israel], and as the dew that descended [come down] upon the mountains of Zion [upon which the city of Jerusalem was built]: for there the LORD commanded[put in order; charged] the blessing, even life [living] for evermore [everlasting].

Like the perpetual dew that shrouded Mt. Hermon (its moisture was carried down by the winds to the arid mountains of Zion), brotherly love and unity is the blessing the LORD sends down upon His people. Brotherly love is an enduring, constant, self-sacrificing love.

The mark of a sincere believer is expressed in not only his love for God, but also his love for the brethren: “By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another”(John 13:35).

What sorrow when brotherly love and unity is lost.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Don’t Worry; God is in Control! (Psalm 81, 88, 92-93)

Daily reading assignment – Psalm 81, 88, 92-93

Today’s scripture reading consists of four chapters in the book of Psalms. I will briefly outline and highlight each, but give greater commentary to the fourth, Psalm 93.

Psalm 81 – Psalm of the Feast of Trumpets

Psalm 81, like Psalm 73, is authored by Asaph a Temple musician. Like all the psalms, this was a psalm you would have heard in the Temple, performed by musicians dedicated to leading the congregation in worship. Psalm 73 coincides with a feast known as the Feast of Trumpets (Numbers 29:1).

Reminding us how important orchestras and congregation singing were to Israel, the psalm calls the people to “Sing aloud unto God our strength: make a joyful noise unto the God of Jacob”(Psalm 81:1). (The “joyful noise” indicates a melody and harmony).

The following verses acknowledge percussion instruments (timbrel), string instruments (harp, psaltery), and woodwind and brass instruments (most likely silver trumpets, of which one hundred twenty are mentioned in (2 Chronicles 5:12).  Imagine how the LORD loved the glorious sound voiced by hundreds of singers accompanied by a great orchestra of skilled musicians!

The balance of Psalm 81 is a reflection on the LORD’s covenant with Israel (81:5-10), the failure of the people to obey the Law and Commandments (81:11-12), and a reminder of the LORD’S longing to bless His people if they keep covenant with Him (81:13-16).

Psalm 88 – A Psalm of Lamentation

Psalm 92 – A Psalm of Praise for the Sabbath Day

Psalms 93 – A Psalm of Praise for God’s Sovereignty

Scholars believe Psalm 93 was written after the Babylonian captivity. In a matter of 70 years, Israel had witnessed the implosion of Babylon, arguably the first great world empire.  Nebuchadnezzar had conquered the known world in his day and among the many nations led away to serve him was Israel.  Unlike other ancient nations that were resettled and assimilated by the Chaldeans, the Jewish people maintained their identity as a chosen people, distinguished by God’s Law.

Israel’s return to their land and the rebuilding of the Temple and city of Jerusalem gave cause for the author of Psalm 93 to state three truths regarding God and His immutable character.

The first truth states, God is Sovereign and His Rule is Forever (93:1-2).

A study of world history yields the reality that even the greatest nations rise and fall.  With the passing of time, every nation that has ever taken its place on the world stage inevitably evidences corruption and the decay of character and morality. Nations rise and nations fall.  Kings rule and presidents preside, but the reign of the LORD is everlasting.

The second declaration proclaims, God is Greater than My Circumstances (93:3-4).

At first glance, we see mighty, destructive floodwaters that describe circumstances that are powerful, sweeping, and devastating (93:3).  We have witnessed the devastating power of floodwaters sweeping away everything in their path…homes, possessions, even lives are lost to the power of surging waters. The floodwaters are emblematic of the rise of nations and their rage against God’s Truth. His voice is mightier than the greatest nations of the earth.

With that picture in mind, the psalmist writes, The LORD on high is mightier” (93:4).   He is mightier than the thundering waters of a waterfall or the pounding waves of the sea.  He is mightier than the circumstances that seem ready to overwhelm you.  He is mightier than the sorrows and disappointments that have brought you low.

Our closing principle is, God is Faithful – His Word, Testimonies and Promises are Sure (93:5).

Israel’s return to her land following the Babylonian captivity fulfilled God’s promise He would not forget or forsake His people.  Surely there were times in Babylon when all seemed lost; the temple had been destroyed, the walls and city of Jerusalem had become nothing more than a pile of rubble, and the people had been removed from their land.  However, not a promise of the LORD had failed and the Jews were restored to their land.

Take heart, God is Sovereign; He is greater and mightier than your circumstances, faithful to His promises, and His reign is forever!

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith