Tag Archives: Satan

The Rise and Fall of Lucifer (Ezekiel 28-30)

Scripture reading – Ezekiel 28-30

Continuing our chronological reading of the Scriptures, today’s assignment is Ezekiel 28-30. Our devotional commentary is taken from Ezekiel 28.

Ezekiel’s Prophecies of God’s Coming Judgment of the Nations

Beginning with Ezekiel 25 and continuing through Ezekiel 32, we have the record of Ezekiel’s prophecies against those nations that had oppressed Israel and Judah.

Ezekiel 26-27 introduced us to the great city of Tyrus and the judgment that Ezekiel prophesied would befall its citizens. Located off the western coastline of Phoenicia, on the Mediterranean Sea, Tyrus was a beautiful and well-fortified city. It was a wealthy city and the commercial crossroads for trade in the ancient Middle East.

Ezekiel 28

The subject of God’s judgment against Tyrus continues with the focus on two powerful political figures: The prince of Tyrus (28:1-10) and the King of Tyrus (28:11-19).

Reflecting the pride of his city, the “prince of Tyrus” was a proud, foolish man who dared assert he was a god. The LORD condemned the prince of Tyrus and commanded Ezekiel to say, “Because thine heart is lifted up, and thou hast said, I am a God, I sit in the seat of God, in the midst of the seas [referring to his throne in his island fortress]; yet thou art a man, and not God, though thou set thine heart as the heart of God” (28:2).

There was no hope for the “prince of Tyrus,” because he was too proud to see that he was no more than a mere mortal. He was proud: Proud of his power (28:2), his intellect (28:3), his wealth (28:4), and his self-sufficiency (28:5). It was his pride that moved the LORD to declare His judgment against the prince. The LORD warned that He would bring “strangers” against Tyrus (fulfilled when Nebuchadnezzar laid siege to the city) who would bloody their swords and defile the beauty of the city (28:7). Ezekiel prophesied the prince would be slain in the street and his body left unburied (28:8-10).

The Humiliation of the King of Tyrus (28:11-19)

The description of the King of Tyrus leaves no doubt that this king was not a man. Though titled “the king of Tyrus” (28:12), the description is of one who was created a perfect being (28:12), and an “anointed cherub” (28:12, 14). He was more than an evil king; he was the wicked one, the Devil, Lucifer, Satan, whose destiny is the eternal lake of fire (Revelation 20:10).

Ezekiel 28 gives us a fascinating revelation of this cherub and his great fall. Before Lucifer was given to pride and his heart lifted up against God, he was a model of perfection and “sealest up the sum” (28:12). He was “full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty” (28:12). He was in the Garden of Eden (28:13) and was attired in precious stones, like those worn on the breastplate of the high priest (28:13). He was musical (28:13). As the “anointed cherub,” he was stationed at the throne of heaven and walked in the presence of God (28:14). Indeed, he was perfect, until his heart was lifted up with pride (28:15).

God is holy and He will not abide sin in His sight! When pride, sin, and violence were discovered in Satan, the LORD cast him out of His presence declaring, “I will destroy thee…I will cast thee to the ground…[and] bring forth a fire from the midst of thee, it shall devour thee” (28:16-18).

The history of man, and the rise and fall of nations, is a testimony of the devil’s presence and influence in the affairs of mankind. While it seems that evil triumphs, remember the LORD is the Alpha and Omega, and He has declared that the end of Satan will be terrifying, and he will “never…be any more” (28:19).

Proverbs 16:18 – “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

God’s Sovereignty and Providential Care (Isaiah 13-17)

Scripture Reading – Isaiah 13-17

Caution: Today’s study covers a great swath of history, from ancient Assyria and the emergence of Babylon, to the “day of the LORD” and His future coming and Millennial Kingdom on the earth. The doom of four nations is prophesied: Babylon (Isaiah 13; 14:1-23), Assyria (Isaiah 14:24-27), Philistia (Isaiah 14:24-32), Moab (Isaiah 15-16), and Syria (identified as Damascus) with whom Israel (identified as Ephraim) was allied and eventually suffered that nation’s fate (Isaiah 17).

Isaiah 13-14 described the prophetic judgment God would bring against Babylon, the nation that would lay siege to Jerusalem and take the Jews captive.  Described in Isaiah 13:1 as the “burden (i.e. doom) of Babylon,” the Book of Daniel records not only the Jewish captivity by Babylon, but also the destruction of that city by the armies of the Medes and Persian nearly two centuries after Isaiah’s prophecy (Isaiah 13:1-5, 17-18; Daniel 5). Isaiah 13:19-22 paints a prophetic picture of the devastation Babylon would eventually suffer. To this day, Babylon lies in ruins under the sands of the desert in Iraq.

Isaiah 14 continues the prophecy against Babylon and predicts the miraculous return of Israel following their captivity (14:1-3). Remarkably, the destruction of the city of Babylon, considered unassailable in its day, is foretold in prophetic detail (Isaiah 14:9-23).

Isaiah 14:12-14 compares the sudden fall of the great king of Babylon to the fall of the archangel Lucifer, who was described as the “son of the morning” (14:12).  The sinful pride that moved Lucifer to challenge the God of Heaven, is the pride that moved Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon to boast he would assail Israel and “exalt my throne above the stars of God” (14:13).  The parallel between the fall of Lucifer and the king of Babylon continues in verse 15.

Isaiah 14:16-23 completes the prophecy against the king of Babylon, describing how the people will gaze upon the king’s lifeless body with wonder, that so powerful a man would be brought to the grave like all men. Indeed, hell itself is said to have been stirred at the entrance of the fallen king of Babylon (14:21-23).

Isaiah 15-16 is a prophecy concerning the “burden of Moab” (literally the doom or prophecy concerning Moab). The Moabites were descendants of Lot’s incest and were perpetual adversaries of Israel. Their geographical lands were located east of the Jordan River, on the southeast side of the Dead Sea.

The subject of Isaiah 17 is the “burden (i.e. doom) of Damascus” (17:1), a prophetic picture of the destruction of Syria’s capital city that was an ally of Israel, and identified as Ephraim (17:3).

Damascus’ destruction would serve as a prophetic warning to Israel of its own impending destruction by Assyria (17:12-14).

A closing note of exhortation: Long passages of prophecy are challenging; however, a daily discipline in God’s Word will not only impart knowledge, but also enrich your appreciation for God’s sovereignty and His providential care of His people.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith