Tag Archives: Worship

God is My Salvation! (2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9-12)

Scripture Reading – 2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9-12

2 Chronicles 27

The contrast between the wicked kings of Israel and the kings of Judah continues with an observation that Jotham, the king of Judah, “did that which was right in the sight of the LORD” (27:1-2). God blessed Jotham and he secured the nation militarily and “became mighty, because he prepared his ways before the LORD his God” (27:6).

Isaiah 9 – The Coming Messiah

Isaiah’s prophecies against Israel, specifically the northern ten tribes, continues in Isaiah 9. The idolatry of the people and their rejection of the LORD, His Law and Commandments demanded a season of chastening that began “lightly,” but the LORD “did more grievously afflict” the nation (9:1). In the midst of Israel’s afflictions, Isaiah prophesied that God would send His Messiah, a son who would be born of a virgin.

Isaiah 9:6 – “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful [Marvelous; Extraordinary], Counsellor [God of all wisdom], The mighty God [all powerful; Omnipotent], The everlasting Father [Father of all Eternity], The Prince of Peace [source, the fount of lasting peace].”

The birth of Jesus Christ fulfilled only the first phrase of Isaiah 9:6 and the Jews’ rejection of Christ, His crucifixion, death and resurrection leaves the balance of that prophecy yet to be fulfilled at Christ’s Second Coming (Isaiah 9:6-7).

Isaiah 9:8-10:4 pronounces God’s future judgment on Israel (in this passage described as “Ephraim and the inhabitant of Samaria,” the capitol city of the northern ten tribes (9:8-9).

Isaiah 10 – Prophecy of Israel’s Fall to Assyria

Isaiah prophesied and history testifies that Assyria would invade Israel, destroy cities, and take the people captive (10:5). God described the Assyrian nation as “the rod of mine anger,” and foretold He would send that heathen people against Israel whom Isaiah said was “an hypocritical nation…the people of my wrath” (10:6).

The Assyrians did not know they were a vessel, a tool in the LORD’S hand, to chasten His people for their sin (10:7). Nevertheless, Assyria’s harsh treatment of Israel and that nation’s boast of their conquests would provoke God’s judgment against them (10:8-19).

Isaiah prophesied the LORD would preserve Himself a remnant of His people (10:21), and unlike the other nations who were taken captive, assimilated, and forever lost to time, God would intervene just when Judah appeared to be on the brink of destruction, and “Lebanon (i.e. Assyria) shall fall” (10:34).

Isaiah 11 – A Messianic Prophecy

The coming Messiah was identified as “a rod out of the stem of Jesse” (11:1), Jesse being the father of King David. Making legitimate the Messiah’s claim to the throne of Israel, he would be born of the lineage of King David, and therefore a royal son and heir to the throne of Israel (Isaiah 11:1).

Isaiah 11:1-2 – “And there shall come forth a rod [shoot] out of the stem [stock] of Jesse (father of King David), and a Branch [descendant] shall grow out of his roots: 2 And the spirit of the LORD shall rest upon Him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the LORD;”

The Millennial Kingdom, over which the Messiah will reign, will be one of righteousness (11:2-5) and universal peace (11:6-9). Israel will be united to her homeland as one people and the Gentile nations will seek the LORD in His holy city, Jerusalem (11:10-13).

Isaiah 12 – A Song of Salvation

Two times we notice the phrase, “And in that day,” in Isaiah 12.

“That day” is yet future, but it is the day when God will gather His chosen people, Israel and Judah, who have been scattered to the “four corners of the earth” (11:11-12) and assemble them as one nation and one people.

“In that day” the people will worship the LORD and say, “I will praise thee…God is my salvation…the LORD Jehovah is my strength and my song; He also is become my salvation” (12:1-2).

This glorious day of restoration as God’s chosen people finds the inhabitants of Zion (Jerusalem) singing praises to the LORD for He, “the Holy One of Israel” dwells in the midst of His people (12:6).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

“Woe is Me!” (Isaiah 5-8)

Scripture Reading – Isaiah 5-8

Isaiah foretold the judgment of God upon Judah in a succession of four distinct woes pronounced against the nation should the people not repent of their sins and turn to the LORD (Isaiah 5:20-23, 26-30).

Notice that three of the woes address Judah and the fourth was exclaimed by Isaiah when he witnessed God sitting on His heavenly throne. Knowing the woes express the character of a people who had rejected God, His Laws, and Commandments, I invite you to contemplate how the spiritual condition of Judah parallels our own nation.

The first woe (Isaiah 5:20) condemned Judah for rejecting God’s Laws, leaving the people with the dilemma of no moral absolutes.

Isaiah 5:20 – “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!”

Such is the condition of our nation and world.  Allow me to illustrate this point with one of many examples I could name: “Gay Marriage”.

The biblical and historical definition of marriage between one man and one woman (Genesis 1:27, 2:18, 21-24; Matthew 19:5-6; Ephesians 5:31) has been under assault for two decades. Politicians, judicial courts, secular schools, and liberal churches have assailed the sanctity of marriage and embraced wickedness and depravity. Condemning moral virtue, our society champions the lunacy of men marrying men and women marrying women (Romans 1:26-27) and demands the judgment of God.

A second woe described the people as unteachable (Isaiah 5:20).

Isaiah 5:21 – “Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent [wise, shrewd] in their own sight!”

Paul’s letter to believers living in Rome describes that same spiritual malady in these words: “Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22).

Who is a fool? Those who reject TRUTH and are unteachable (“The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God” – Psalm 14:1; 53:1). When a man rejects His Creator (Romans 1:23), God abandons him to sinful passions that are expressed in the depth of his depravity: “vile affections…unseemly…reprobate” (Romans 1:24-32).

A third woe illuminated the narcissistic nature of the people of Judah and their loathing of the righteous.

Isaiah 5:22-23 – “Woe unto them that are mighty to drink wine [drunkards], and men of strength to mingle strong drink [boasting of their drunkenness]: 23 Which justify [acquit] the wicked for reward [bribe], and take away the righteousness [innocence; justice, rights and liberties] of the righteous from him!”

The fourth woe is one Isaiah stated of himself.  Shaken by a vision of the LORD sitting on His heavenly throne (Isaiah 6:1-4), Isaiah saw the manner of man he was and was overwhelmed by his sinfulness. The prophet confessed:

Isaiah 6:5“…Woe is me! for I am undone [dumb; silent; perish]; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean [defiled; polluted] lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.”

The LORD was looking for a man who would declare His final warning to Judah before effecting His judgment. Isaiah, his lips purged from sin by a “live coal…off the altar” (Isaiah 6:6-7), and with a fire burning in his soul, heard God ask:

“Who shall I send, and who will go for us?” Isaiah answered saying, “Here am I; send me” (Isaiah 6:8).

A closing thought: I believe I have made the case that the sinful conditions of Judah in Isaiah’s day are the same as those we see in our nation and world. The world has rejected the LORD and His Commandments, and become morally bankrupt (no right or wrong).  We have ejected God from public places and become unteachable. We are slaves to temporal pleasures (boasting of our vices and despising righteousness). The ominous clouds of God’s imminent judgment are clearly seen. Who among us will be humbled by the knowledge of our sinfulness and pray with Isaiah,

“Woe is me… mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts…Here am I; send me.” (Isaiah 6:8).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Living Life in A Rearview Mirror (Ecclesiastes 7-12)

Scripture Reading – Ecclesiastes 7-12

Today’s Scripture reading covers the latter half of the book of Ecclesiastes; however, my devotional commentary will focus on the closing chapters, Ecclesiastes 11-12.

While the book of Proverbs chronicles Solomon’s wise instructions for a son that would one day be king, the book of Ecclesiastes reflects the pondering of that same man facing the inevitable close of his earthly life–the frailty of old age and death.

Solomon’s reflections on his earthly sojourn began with the observation, “Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). He concludes with the same, “Vanity of vanities, saith the preacher; all is vanity” (Ecclesiastes 12:8).

Empty, vain, unsatisfactory, meaningless, hopeless, and worthless… What a tragic commentary on life from a man born into privilege, power, and wealth!  What might we learn from such a man?  What words of wisdom can we glean from one deemed so wise, with so much to say?

For the sake of brevity, I invite you to consider three exhortations from King Solomon: Rejoice (11:9-10); Remember (12:1); and Revere (12:13-14).

Rejoice in your youth, but know God will be your Judge (11:9-10).

 Ecclesiastes 11:9-10 – Rejoice [Be Glad; Joyful], O young man, in thy youth; and let thy heart cheer thee in the days of thy youth, and walk in the ways of thine heart, and in the sight of thine eyes: but know thou, that for all these things God will bring thee into judgment. 10  Therefore remove [depart] sorrow [anger; wrath] from thy heart, and put away [do away; remove] evil [sin; wickedness] from thy flesh: for childhood and youth are vanity.

Remember your Creator while you are young (12:1).

Ecclesiastes 12:1 – Remember now [Think of; have respect of] thy Creator in the days [years] of thy youth, while the evil days [adversity; troubles; distresses] come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no pleasure [delight; desire] in them;

Revere God, Keep His Commandments and Be Ready for His Judgment (12:13-14).

Ecclesiastes 12:13-14 – Let us hear [Listen; obey; publish] the conclusion [end] of the whole matter [account; speaking]Fear [Revere] God, and keep [observe] His commandments [Laws; Precepts]: for this is the whole duty [purpose] of man.
14  For God shall bring every work [act; deed] into judgment, with every secret thing [hidden; concealed], whether it be good [right], or whether it be evil [sin; wickedness].

Vanity of vanities; what a tragic summary of a man’s life if his life is empty and meaningless!

To his credit, Solomon was not silent regarding the sorrows and joys of this life. He warned and exhorted the generations that would follow… Rejoice in your youth…Remember your Creator and His Commandments…and Revere the LORD knowing He will “bring every work into judgment” (12:14).

A closing exhortation to youthful readers: Adopt spiritual principles that will guide you to paths of righteousness, and avoid the ways of the foolish who squander their lives in sinful dissipations that leave them with sorrows and regrets.

Enjoy your youth, but remember your Creator for “it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment” (Hebrews 9:27).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Glory of God and the Heart of Man (Proverbs 25-26)

Scripture Reading – Proverbs 25-26

While today’s Scripture reading is two chapters in Proverbs, the focus for this devotional commentary is limited to the introductory verses of Proverbs 25, verses 1-3. I encourage you to read the Scriptures first and then consider this brief devotional commentary.

Solomon, a man whose passion for wisdom was uniquely blessed by God, was renowned for his knowledge and understanding. Because his wisdom was inspired by God, Solomon’s insights far exceeded the natural aptitude of men. We are blessed to have thirty-one chapters of Solomon’s proverbs; however, these are but a summary of the thousands of wise sayings he imparted to his family and subjects.

 “These are also proverbs of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied out.” (Proverbs 25:1)

It appears that Solomon compiled Proverbs 1-24 and that Proverbs 25 marks the commencement of an effort by King Hezekiah, who reigned a century later than Solomon, to preserve Solomon’s proverbial sayings and insights (Proverbs 25:1).

Proverbs 25:2-3 – “It is the glory [honor] of God to conceal [hide; keep secret] a thing [matter; word that is spoken; act]: but the honour of kings is to search out [explore; inquire; examine] a matter.  The heaven [heavens; sky] for height [to be exalted], and the earth for depth, and the heart [mind; wisdom; understanding] of kings is unsearchable [unfathomable].” 

The subject matter of these two verses is necessarily political because they offer us a contrast between God, Who has chosen to not reveal everything about Himself and His ways, and rulers who choose not to reveal everything to their subjects.

Oh that men were driven by a passionate longing to know God!  God invites men to seek Him; search the Scriptures (John 5:39); and study His Word (2 Timothy 2:15).

Mankind is incapable of understanding all the ways of God (Isaiah 55:9); however, what He has revealed of Himself in His Word should be the subject of our thoughts and daily meditations.

As a practical, closing observation, take a moment to read the latter half of Proverbs 25:2 and consider,“the honour of kings is to search out a matter.” 

All who are in authority are a credit to their office when they “search out a matter” (in other words, seek out and expose the truth).

Our nation is riddled by political scandals and our leaders from the White House to the courthouse, have shown little interest in exploring, inquiring and exposing the truth.  It is a dereliction of duty and a disgrace when lives are lost, bodies maimed, reputations ruined, and families destroyed and no one is brought to justice.

Let’s begin a restoration of honor by being a people who seek God with all our hearts, study His Word, and evidence integrity by pursuing truth and following after righteousness.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Solomon’s Faithfulness to the LORD (1 Kings 9; 2 Chronicles 8)

Scripture reading assignment – 1 Kings 9; 2 Chronicles 8

Having completed the Temple, “the glory of the LORD” so filled it that the “priests could not stand to minister” (8:11). Solomon then offered a prayer of thanksgiving and dedicated the Temple before the people (8:22-53).

1 Kings 9 is God’s response to Solomon’s prayer of dedication.

The LORD promised to bless Solomon if he would be a man of “integrity [upright; innocent] of heart, and in uprightness [honesty; walking a straight path], to do according to all that I have commanded thee, and wilt keep [observe; heed] my statutes [ordinances; rules; laws] and my judgments [verdict]” (9:4).

God warned Solomon, should he or his children disobey His Law and Commandments and serve idols, the nation would be “cut off” and everyone would know Israel had forsaken the LORD and He had brought judgment against the nation (9:5-9).

The closing verses of 1 Kings 9 detail for us the cities Solomon built with Gentile slave laborers (9:15-24). In addition to the cities, we learn that Hiram, king of Tyre, assisted Solomon in building a fleet of ships (9:26-28; 2 Chronicles 8:17-18).

2 Chronicles 8 – The Twenty-first Year of Solomon’s Reign

2 Chronicles 8 records the accomplishments of Solomon at the close of the twentieth year of his reign (8:1) including the cities he had built and others he had conquered (8:2-6).

Showing the expanse of his realm, Solomon levied extra taxes on those who were strangers in his domain (8:7-8) and they were constricted to bear the labor of his palace. Solomon’s army and their captains were men of Israel (8:9-10).

2 Chronicles 8 concludes noting the various sacrifices Solomon offered and the feast days he and Israel observed as a people during his reign (8:12-16).

What can we take away from today’s Scripture?

Let’s remember Solomon’s commitment to the LORD and his faithful observance of the sacrifices and feasts days according to the Law (8:12-13). He made worship a priority and assured that the priests and Levites would faithfully perform their duties, leading the people in praising the LORD and singing the psalms (8:14-15).

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

Why Trust the LORD? (Psalms 134, 146-150)

Daily Scripture Reading – Psalms 134, 146-150

Today’s Scripture reading comprises six psalms: Psalms 134, 146, 147, 148, 149, and 150. I will limit the devotional commentary to Psalm 146.

The author of Psalm 146 is not known; however, his purpose in writing the psalm is obvious: It is a song of praise to the LORD.  Notice that the psalmist employs numerous names for God that are meant to describe His nature, personality, and character.

An Explanation: Understanding a word in the Hebrew texts can be translated into English with more than one word. It is my desire to give you a broader understanding and insight into this beautiful psalm of praise for your own worship and edification. My amplification of words in the text is in brackets.

The psalmist begins Psalm 146 directing his praise and worship to the only One worthy of praise…the LORD (146:1-2).

Psalm 146:1-2 1  Praise [Hallelujah; Glory; Boast; Celebrate] ye the LORD [Yahweh; the sacred name of the LORD]. Praise the LORD [Jehovah; Eternal, Self-Existent God], O my soul.
2  While I live [have life] will I praise the LORD: I will sing praises [sing psalms] unto my God [Elohim; mighty God] while I have any being.

The psalmist exhorts and admonishes the people to not put their trust or confidence in man (146:3-4).  

Psalm 146:3-4  3  Put not your trust [confidence] in princes, nor in the son [children] of man, in whom there is no help [salvation; deliverance].
4  His breath [man’s breath] goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; in that very day [time] his thoughts perish.

Whether a prince among men or a mere mortal man; all men live under the sentence of death (Romans 6:23). Their breath disappears as a vapor, their bodies return to dust, and their plans and designs perish with them.

Such is the spiritual lesson the rich man encountered in Luke 12. 

Experiencing an overflow of the fruits of his labor at the time of harvest, the rich man determined to tear down his barns and hoard God’s blessings (Luke 12:17-18).  God judged the man a fool (Luke 12:19-20). Because his affections were on earthly riches, he died a spiritual pauper… “So is he that layeth up treasure for himself and is not rich towards God” (Luke 12:21).

While the rich man’s affections for earthly treasures perished with him, the psalmist describes the man who looks to the LORD as “Happy” (146:5).

Psalm 146:5  5  Happy [Blessed; prosperous] is he that hath the God [Almighty God] of Jacob for his help [aid], whose hope [expectation] is in the LORD his God:

Why should you trust the LORD (146:6-9)? 

The psalmist suggests four qualities that lead us to trust the LORD.

We should trust the LORD because He is Creator of heaven, earth, the sea and “all that therein is”. (146:6)

Psalm 146:6  6  Which made heaven, and earth, the sea, and all that therein is: which keepeth [preserves; guards] truth for ever [i.e. God is forever faithful; trustworthy]:

We should trust the LORD because He is faithful and true: He “keepeth truth for ever” (146:6b).

We should trust the LORD because He is just and compassionate. (146:7-9)

Psalm 146:7-9 7  Which executeth [lit. to make or prepare] judgment for the oppressed: which giveth food to the hungry. The LORD looseth [sets at liberty] the prisoners: 8  The LORD openeth the eyes of the blind: the LORD raiseth [lifts up; comforts] them that are bowed down: the LORD loveth the righteous [just]: 9  The LORD preserveth [keeps watch; regards; saves] the strangers [sojourners]; he relieveth [bear witness; admonish; protects] the fatherless and widow: but the way [journey; path] of the wicked [ungodly; guilty] he turneth upside down [subverts; thwarts; overthrows].

Fourthly, we should trust the LORD because He is King Eternal, the God of Zion of whose kingdom there is no end (146:10).

Psalm 146:10 10  The LORD shall reign for ever, even thy God, O Zion, unto all generations. Praise ye the LORD.

How foolish to trust man or place your confidence in earthly possessions!  The LORD is eternal, just, compassionate, faithful, true and our Creator!

Why trust any other?

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

A Covenant Promise for a Humble People (2 Chronicles 6-7)

Daily reading assignment – 2 Chronicles 6-7; Psalm 136

The reign of Solomon proved to be a glorious time in Israel’s history. Evidencing humility, Solomon requested the LORD give him wisdom (2 Chronicles 1:10) and God honored his request promising him not only wisdom, but also “riches, and wealth, and honour, such as none of the kings have had that have been before thee, neither shall there any after thee have the like” (1:12).

Having fulfilled his father’s desire to build a house for the LORD, Solomon dedicated the Temple and adorned it with furnishings reflecting the majesty of the LORD (2 Chronicles 2-5).

In 2 Chronicles 6 Solomon leads Israel in worshipping the LORD and affirming to the people the hand and providence of God upon them as His chosen people (6:1-11).  Solomon’s prayer of dedication for the Temple is recorded in 2 Chronicles 6:12-42.

The LORD, having heard the prayer of Solomon, responded with a confirmation that was magnificent to behold (7:1-22).

2 Chronicles 7:1 – “Now when Solomon had made an end of praying, the fire came down from heaven, and consumed the burnt offering and the sacrifices; and the glory of the LORD filled the house.”

2 Chronicles 7:3 – “And when all the children of Israel saw how the fire came down, and the glory of the LORD upon the house, they bowed themselves with their faces to the ground upon the pavement, and worshipped, and praised the LORD, saying, For he [the LORD] is good; for his mercy endureth for ever.

2 Chronicles 7:11 gives testimony of God’s grace and blessing upon Solomon in response to his prayer: “All that came into Solomon’s heart to make in the house of the LORD, and in his own house, he prosperously effected” (7:11).

In response to Solomon’s prayer, the LORD promised:

2 Chronicles 7:14 – “If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.”

We read three promises in God’s covenant with Israel. The first, nations will face calamitous times…drought, adversities of nature (i.e. locusts), trials and famine (7:13).  The second, God hears and answers the prayers of His people when they humble themselves before Him, pray and repent of their sins (7:14a).  Finally, God will forgive the sins of His people and heal the nation (7:14b).

I close acknowledging 2 Chronicles 7:14 was God’s covenant with Israel; however, those same promises represent my longing for our own nation. I pray the troubles and adversities we are facing will move us to humble ourselves before God, confess our sins, seek His forgiveness, and that He will heal our land.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

A Dedication and a Celebration (1 Kings 8; 2 Chronicles 5)

Scripture Reading – 1 Kings 8; 2 Chronicles 5

My apology for a late post of today’s devotional commentary. My computer began failing on Wednesday. Regrettably, I purchased a new laptop to replace my old one that was nearly six years old. To quote an old Persian adage, “this too shall pass!”

Today’s Scripture reading is 1 Kings 8 and 2 Chronicles 5.

1 Kings 8 – Dedication of the Temple

We have followed the building of the Temple from its inception in the heart of King David, to its construction fulfilled during the reign of his son, Solomon. The Temple having been completed, and all the necessary implements and utensils readied, the day for dedicating the Temple came.

After the furnishings were placed in the Temple, the Ark of the Covenant was carried up by the priests from David’s palace complex (8:1-4). With sacrifices so great they could not be numbered, the Ark was placed in the oracle, meaning the inner sanctuary of the Temple we identify as the “Holy of Holies” (8:5-6) and sat beneath the wings of the great cherubims that resided in the holy place (8:7-8). With the passing of centuries, all that remained in the Ark was the treasured tablets upon which God had written His Commandments (8:9).

We read that the glory of God so “filled the house of the LORD” that the “priests could not stand to minister” (8:10-11).  Why?  Why were the priests unable to minister in the Temple after the LORD’s glory filled the house?

Because the God of Heaven is a Holy, glorious God with whom mortal man dare not trifle.  His glory is “like devouring fire” (Exodus 24:17). He is “a consuming fire” (Deuteronomy 4:24). God’s presence was so powerful and convicting that the priests “could not stand to minister” (8:11a).

The dedication of the Temple continued with Solomon rehearsing how his father had longed to build the Temple, but was forbidden by God, and how that privilege passed to David’s son (8:12-21).  In the sight of all the people, Solomon offered a prayer of thanksgiving, remembering God’s faithfulness to His covenant promises and praying for the nation (8:22-30).

Knowing the justice of God, Solomon confessed the bent of man’s sinful heart to depart from the Law and Commandments (8:31-32). Solomon prayed that when Israel sinned as a nation, that the LORD would not forsake His people, but would hear their confession, and upon their repentance, would forgive their sin (8:33-36).

Knowing troubles would befall the nation (example, famine arising from physical disasters and blights), Solomon prayed that the LORD would hear the prayers of every man (8:37-43).  Should the people go to war and fall captive, the king prayed the LORD would hear the prayers of His people and restore them to their homeland (8:44-50). Remember the mercies of God in the past, Solomon concluded his prayer by reminding the LORD how He had chosen Israel and brought the people out of Egypt under Moses (8:51-53).

The dedication of the Temple being ended, Solomon blessed the people and led a celebration with sacrifices and offerings that continued fourteen days (8:54-66).

2 Chronicles 5 adds an additional element to the celebration that demonstrates the prominence of music in the worship of the LORD (5:12-13).

While we will not see the visible presence of the LORD’S glory in a cloud in today’s sanctuaries, it is my prayer that we would be so conscious of the LORD in our worship that we cannot but reverence and glorify Him.

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The LORD Deserves Nothing Less Than Our Best (1 Kings 7; 2 Chronicles 4)

Scripture Reading – 1 Kings 7; 2 Chronicles 4

Because his reign was one of peace, Solomon was able to dedicate himself to many construction projects.

While the Temple required seven years to build (6:38), Solomon’s palace was under construction for thirteen years, the details of which are given in 1 Kings 7:1-12. Some scholars refer to the “the house of the forest of Lebanon” as a summer house or lodge for the king; however, I have come to believe it was a great house that was part of the palace complex (7:2-8). I believe it was so named because of the great amount of cedar pillars that supported its roof.

We read that Solomon also built a house for his queen who was “Pharaoh’s daughter” (7:8). Again, I believe that the queen’s house was attached to the palace complex.

The attention turns from Solomon’s palace grounds and returns to the preparations for the Temple. A craftsman named Hiram, not the same Hiram who was king of Tyre, was enlisted to make intricate, elaborate pieces of brass, silver and gold for the Temple (7:13-51). Skilled as a metal artisan, he “was filled with wisdom, and understanding, and cunning to work all works in brass” (1 Kings 7:14).

The attention to detail and beauty is worth noting, even down to the utensils used in Temple sacrifices. Tables of gold, golden lampstands, basins of gold, and golden lavers engraved with lilies (2 Chronicles 4:5). Doors of brass and pillars engraved with wreaths and pomegranates (4:9, 12-13) all added to the beauty of the Temple.

Why such attention to detail? Because Solomon was building a house for the LORD, and it was an outward testimony of the greatness of His God (2 Chronicles 2:5-6).

I close with a similar challenge for today’s believer. Why should we expect the worship of the LORD in our churches to be the best that we can offer? Why should we strive to give him music of our praise that aspires to the highest offerings? Why should we give attention to the beauty of our places of worship?

Because the LORD deserves no less than our absolute best. Paul challenged the believers in Corinth:

1 Corinthians 10:31 – “Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith

The Temple: A Great House for a Great God (1 Kings 5-6; 2 Chronicles 2-3)

Scripture Reading – 1 Kings 5-6; 2 Chronicles 2-3

1 Kings 5

Fulfilling his father’s dream and honoring his legacy (5:2-4), Solomon set about acquiring the building materials necessary for constructing the Temple in Jerusalem (1 Kings 5).

Requesting the assistance of his father’s friend, Hiram king of Tyre, Solomon ordered cedars from Lebanon and requested skilled laborers “to hew timber” (5:6).  Hiram agreed to supply cedar and fir timbers for the Temple, floating them on the Mediterranean Sea to Joppa, a port designated by Solomon (5:7-10; 2 Chronicles 2:16).

In turn, Solomon contracted with Hiram to provide sustenance consisting of wheat and pure oil (5:11-12).  The size and scope of the Temple project is revealed in the tens of thousands of alien laborers that were employed in acquiring construction materials (5:13-18).

1 Kings 6

The date Solomon began construction on the Temple was revealed as 480 years after Israel’s exodus from Egypt (6:1).

Details of the exterior dimensions and size of the interior chambers are recorded (6:2-10). Assuming a cubit was 21 inches, the outside of the Temple was 90 feet high, 30 feet wide, and 45 feet high (6:2). On the front of the Temple was a porch described as 30 feet wide and 15 feet deep (6:3). The Temple had window openings allowing natural light to penetrate the interior of the Temple (6:4). There were also interior chambers or vestries for Temple utensils and the robes and dress rooms for the priests (6:5-6). The beams of the Temple rested on the walls of the building (6:6).

The skill of the laborers is revealed in that the large stones of the Temple were pre-cut away from the building site and no tool was to be used in the building that would disturb the peace and quiet of the place that would be a house of worship (6:7-10).

In the midst of the construction, the LORD renewed the covenant he had first established with David. God assured the young king that, if he would walk in His statutes and keep His commandments, He would fulfill all He had promised (6:11-12) and would dwell in the midst of Israel (6:13).

The “oracle” (6:19), the innermost sanctuary where the Ark of the Covenant was located (also known as the “Holy of Holies” or the “holy place”) was a perfect cube with dimensions that were 30 feet wide, 30 feet long, and 30 feet high (6:20). Concealed by a beautifully embroidered curtain, the oracle was a place of exquisite beauty with ceiling, floor, and walls paneled in cedar that was engraved and overlaid with a veneer of pure gold (6:15-30).

2 Chronicles 2-3 – A Record of the Temple for Babylonian Exiles

As a reminder, the Chronicles were written for those Jews who were exiled from Israel and living in Babylon. There are some additional details regarding the Temple that are offered here, but I particularly want to invite you to consider 2 Chronicles 2:4-6 where Solomon addressed the purpose of the Temple (2:4) and the greatness of the LORD (2:5-6).

For Israel, the Temple was the place of worship (2 Chronicles 2:5-6). The inner sanctuary where the Ark of the Covenant was located, was representative of the throne of God in the midst of His people.

How great is our God? Can a building made by men contain Him? Of course not!

2 Chronicles 2:5-6a5  And the house which I build is great: for great is our God above all gods. 6  But who is able to build him an house, seeing the heaven and heaven of heavens cannot contain him?”

Copyright 2020 – Travis D. Smith